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  1. #1
    Hi!!!
    Reputation: BelaySlave's Avatar
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    Bonking ... not feelin' well Man these bikes can be high maintenance!

    Guess I better learn under the tutelage of flipnidaho and learn how to take care of my damn bike.

    Right now the 575 is at Custom Cycles here in Boise and I should be able to pick her up at the end of the day.

    I'll be the first to admit that I suck horribly at properly maintaining a bike. I do the somewhat weekly wash and lube, but other than that, I suck. Call me lazy and unknowledgeable I guess. I just want to ride! And that eventually catches up with you like it did me!

    I'm getting the brakes aligned, new pads installed, the RP3 serviced, new chain, the rear suspension worked on, etc.. Basically my bike is LOUD...brake squeal, creaking and cracking, yadda yadda yadda. And I do take the blame for it. I do realize that having a bike like the 575 demands a bit of routine maintenance and in that area I think I have failed. Ehhh you live and you learn.

    I do know that sometime later this year I will probably have to have the Vanilla worked on as well as the suspension bearings replaced. Better safe than sorry! Fortunately I'm able to prodeal a number of items so I can save $ there. And I do feel good about the shop. Very knowledgeable and honest. I don't mind shelling out the $ to have these guys work on it.

    Nick
    Idaho Biking Yahoo! Group
    Support these shops: www.CustomMtnCycles.com & Reed's Cycle

  2. #2
    In my mind, I can do it!
    Reputation: iviguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BelaySlave
    Guess I better learn under the tutelage of flipnidaho and learn how to take care of my damn bike.

    Right now the 575 is at Custom Cycles here in Boise and I should be able to pick her up at the end of the day.

    I'll be the first to admit that I suck horribly at properly maintaining a bike. I do the somewhat weekly wash and lube, but other than that, I suck. Call me lazy and unknowledgeable I guess. I just want to ride! And that eventually catches up with you like it did me!

    I'm getting the brakes aligned, new pads installed, the RP3 serviced, new chain, the rear suspension worked on, etc.. Basically my bike is LOUD...brake squeal, creaking and cracking, yadda yadda yadda. And I do take the blame for it. I do realize that having a bike like the 575 demands a bit of routine maintenance and in that area I think I have failed. Ehhh you live and you learn.

    I do know that sometime later this year I will probably have to have the Vanilla worked on as well as the suspension bearings replaced. Better safe than sorry! Fortunately I'm able to prodeal a number of items so I can save $ there. And I do feel good about the shop. Very knowledgeable and honest. I don't mind shelling out the $ to have these guys work on it.

    Nick
    I have learned more about wrenching since I got a work stand then I ever knew in 10 years. Things happen and then I have to fix it. Like trying to put the rear wheel back on and the rotor gets hung on the brake pad and while trying to remove it the pad pops out. So I had to figure out how the pads go in. It's really easy actually. I'll do my own pad replacements now.

    Then there was the turkey call issue with the brakes. I had to do a little searching to figure out how to resolve it which required taking the brake calipers off and putting a washer under it, then of course you have to realign the calipers and brakes.

    Then I bent a caliper and had to straighten it myself... There have been a host of things and by now I have probably easily paid for the work stand in what would have been paid visits to the LBS. If you don't have a work stand, buy one. Best thing you could get, bar none.

    I still have a lot to learn but it's nice being able to do some basic maintenance. Oh, and do yourself a favor and order a spare derailleur hanger. I bent mine on the very first ride. It costs $15 to straighten and $10 for a new hanger... go figure.

    BTW - Too hot in Boise?? Try 101F with about 50% humidity...

  3. #3
    Hi!!!
    Reputation: BelaySlave's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by iviguy
    If you don't have a work stand, buy one. Best thing you could get, bar none.
    Yup got one. Don't have specific bike tools. Just a couple of multi-tools, a pedal wrench, some hex wrences, and just regular househould tools. Got a number of books too, but me and reading don't get along, but that's a whole 'nother thread. And I realize sites like ParkTool.com and SheldonBrown.com have alot of info available for DIY'ers.

    I still have a lot to learn but it's nice being able to do some basic maintenance.
    Yeah basic maintenance is all I'm looking to really learn. I know flipnidaho is doing maintenance classes this summer, but cuz of working at REI, my schedule doesn't match with his.

    Oh, and do yourself a favor and order a spare derailleur hanger.
    Yup got one of those somewhere in my house. Not sure where though. It got lost during the painting of my equipment room .

    BTW - Too hot in Boise?? Try 101F with about 50% humidity...
    Mid 90s is about my limit to MTB. I'll road bike if it's warmer than that. THANK GOD we don't get the awful humidity that alot of the US gets during the summer. I visited DC a couple of times during the summer and it was just HORRIBLE!!!!
    Idaho Biking Yahoo! Group
    Support these shops: www.CustomMtnCycles.com & Reed's Cycle

  4. #4
    In my mind, I can do it!
    Reputation: iviguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BelaySlave
    Yup got one. Don't have specific bike tools. Just a couple of multi-tools, a pedal wrench, some hex wrences, and just regular househould tools. Got a number of books too, but me and reading don't get along, but that's a whole 'nother thread. And I realize sites like ParkTool.com and SheldonBrown.com have alot of info available for DIY'ers.
    That's all I have. I use parktool.com the most though. If you have basic mechanical skills it's not as hard as you might think. I shy'd away from it for a long time because I didn't want to mess up what I ride. But having to be forced to do it when something stupid happens has shown me it's not that bad really.

    Yeah basic maintenance is all I'm looking to really learn. I know flipnidaho is doing maintenance classes this summer, but cuz of working at REI, my schedule doesn't match with his.
    Hang out with the wrenches at REI. (now I know why you can get the deals you talk about on bike equipment... )

    Yup got one of those somewhere in my house. Not sure where though. It got lost during the painting of my equipment room .
    I leave mine in the camelbak.

    Mid 90s is about my limit to MTB. I'll road bike if it's warmer than that. THANK GOD we don't get the awful humidity that alot of the US gets during the summer. I visited DC a couple of times during the summer and it was just HORRIBLE!!!!
    I did a 14 mile ride yesterday after work in this 101F heat. In the trees it's not that bad really. In the open fields it's a killer though. I can't imagine roading it on hot days like that. The trees are a blessing in the heat.

  5. #5
    In my mind, I can do it!
    Reputation: iviguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BelaySlave
    Yup got one. Don't have specific bike tools. Just a couple of multi-tools, a pedal wrench, some hex wrences, and just regular househould tools. Got a number of books too, but me and reading don't get along, but that's a whole 'nother thread. And I realize sites like ParkTool.com and SheldonBrown.com have alot of info available for DIY'ers.
    That's all I have. I use parktool.com the most though. If you have basic mechanical skills it's not as hard as you might think. I shy'd away from it for a long time because I didn't want to mess up what I ride. But having to be forced to do it when something stupid happens has shown me it's not that bad really.

    Yeah basic maintenance is all I'm looking to really learn. I know flipnidaho is doing maintenance classes this summer, but cuz of working at REI, my schedule doesn't match with his.
    Hang out with the wrenches at REI. (now I know why you can get the deals you talk about on bike equipment... )

    Yup got one of those somewhere in my house. Not sure where though. It got lost during the painting of my equipment room .
    I leave mine in the camelbak.

    Mid 90s is about my limit to MTB. I'll road bike if it's warmer than that. THANK GOD we don't get the awful humidity that alot of the US gets during the summer. I visited DC a couple of times during the summer and it was just HORRIBLE!!!!
    I did a 14 mile ride yesterday after work in this 101F heat. In the trees it's not that bad really. In the open fields it's a killer though. I can't imagine roading it on hot days like that. The trees are a blessing in the heat.

  6. #6
    Who is John Galt?
    Reputation: Big Jim Mac's Avatar
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    I never learned much about taking care of my bike because the LBS offers lifetime free maintenance. Never even lubed my chain before, why bother when they do it for you? With teh Yeti it's a different story so I went to the library and picked up Zinn and the Art of Mountain Bike Maintenance. Be sure you get the latest edition of this wonderful manual. I picked up an older one and it was pretty worthless unless you have a really really old bike. Blue Sky Cycling had some good deals on work stands. I got the Park PCS 9.

    What's the issue with adjusting disc brakes? That's why I like Avid Juicy 7s, you loosen the bolts holding the caliper on, squeeze the handle and tighten the bolts back up. Poof, it's right. And no tools to put in new pads. Only time these squeek is when they are wet, which you can avoid, let's just say, by carrying your bike across the creek...
    What, me hurry?

  7. #7
    In my mind, I can do it!
    Reputation: iviguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Jim Mac
    which you can avoid, let's just say, by carrying your bike across the creek...
    ROFL... Be nice now....

  8. #8
    a.k.a. MTBMaven
    Reputation: mtnfiend's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Jim Mac
    why bother when they do it for you?
    I am glad to see you started wrenching on your bike. For those who still ask this question I say you need to know how to fix things on your bike because when the $hit hits the fan on the trail and your miles from the trailhead you need to be able to fix you ride or else you're walking out. (How's that for a run on sentence?) I used to ride by myself all the time in fairly remote areas. You need to be able to fix a chain, replace a derailleur hanger, fix a side wall blow out, ride with a broken derailleur, fix you index shifting, etc. All of these things can be done with a Crank Brothers multi tool and a few other essential tools. It's not rocket science. Read Sheldon Brown's website. I learned tons of stuff from his site. The best information I have found to fix shifting.

    I used to tear down my Enduro all the time because is squeaked all the time and the shifting sucked. I hardly touch my 575. It just keeps rolling along. I find that DurAce cables are really good for maintaining good shifting quality. I only use DurAce cables and full cable housing now. Oh and the Roll-A-Majig works great if you use Shimano rear derailleurs.
    I thought of that while riding my bicycle. ~ Albert Einstein on the theory of relativity

  9. #9
    Who is John Galt?
    Reputation: Big Jim Mac's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnfiend
    I am glad to see you started wrenching on your bike. For those who still ask this question I say you need to know how to fix things on your bike because when the $hit hits the fan on the trail and your miles from the trailhead you need to be able to fix you ride or else you're walking out.
    There's a whole chapter on emergency repairs in the Zinn book, some pretty creative stuff.
    What, me hurry?

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