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  1. #1
    Who is John Galt?
    Reputation: Big Jim Mac's Avatar
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    At last: Something to complain about

    I finally found something I don't like about the 575. When I ride the technical spots I am smaking the pedals a lot on rocks. Maybe I have too much sag? I measured when I got back and seated on the bike there is only about 6 inches or less between the bottom of the pedal and the ground. I know I need to get the pedals in the horizontal position when rocks come by but sometimes you have to give it that pedal to get over something. Is the BB height too low for this bike? I did add more air to the shock mid-ride, running about 190 now which is about my weight. I notice too I am using all the travel, set the O-ring before I started, but I did nail a pretty good jump so that may have bottomed it.
    What, me hurry?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Jim Mac
    I finally found something I don't like about the 575. When I ride the technical spots I am smaking the pedals a lot on rocks. Maybe I have too much sag? I measured when I got back and seated on the bike there is only about 6 inches or less between the bottom of the pedal and the ground. I know I need to get the pedals in the horizontal position when rocks come by but sometimes you have to give it that pedal to get over something. Is the BB height too low for this bike? I did add more air to the shock mid-ride, running about 190 now which is about my weight. I notice too I am using all the travel, set the O-ring before I started, but I did nail a pretty good jump so that may have bottomed it.
    I have mentioned it a couple of times in my reviewes . In rock gardens I find my HT more capable so far. I don't recommend you change your suspension setup eventhough it may help since it'll compromise performance in other terrains.
    575 has a high BB but it reduces withn sag and furthar reduce during suspension action. We need to refine our riding capabilities and pedaling timing when climbing steps and at rock gardens. Need to time the suspension action and pedal during rebound rather than compression. Now that is easier to say than do but I started to improve on it.
    Any other tips are welcomed.
    BTW, when do you sleep?.

  3. #3
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    You have a decent BB height. It's just pedal positioning that we eventually learn. My buddy has a Trek HT and does it way more than I do. He's always complaining about pedal strikes on the same trails and I see him whack them on sections I have no problems. So I guess it does have to do with effective BB height and the rider getting used to the technique. Some of the guys in the General forum may be able to give you more specific tips since it has amuch bigger audience.

  4. #4
    Who is John Galt?
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    As always, the limitations of this bike seem to be human more so than mechanical! I'll have to sing the praises of the Time pedals I put on this thing, they took two huge hits yesterday and I can't see a thing wrong with them. Guess I have been burning the midnight oil, rode two trails, maybe 12 miles and it's hard to come down from that kind of high.
    What, me hurry?

  5. #5
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    Sometimes, I rachet through sections when I see some high rocks and have hit them before. Also, I sometimes pick up speed and coast through with momentum while racheting or spinning as needed. You develop some cool skills and balance this way too.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flyer
    Sometimes, I rachet through sections when I see some high rocks and have hit them before. Also, I sometimes pick up speed and coast through with momentum while racheting or spinning as needed. You develop some cool skills and balance this way too.
    Sorry, what's rachet?.

  7. #7
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    Let me see if I can explain it. Racheting is when you start with the pedal on top, give it a strong and quick stroke downwards BUT stop before the pedal gets past being parallel to the ground. Usually I use less than a 90 degree or quarter stroke but can be a bit more. Then you pull the pedal back up and repeat the process thus "racheting" along instead of completing full pedal strokes. You can switch to left of right side racheting depending on where the rocks are but I find myself using the right/predominant side 90% of the time.

    I only learned this when I started to ride a lot of slow and rocky technical sections. It is a technique many use but I sort of stumbled upon it while trying to avoid bashing my pedals on rocks. You can even do this standing up and many fid it easier to do when standing on your pedal. however- BE CAREFUL if you do this. Don't be too high up and in front of your seat since a well placed hit can send you over the bars.

  8. #8
    stay thirsty, my friends
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flyer
    Also, I sometimes pick up speed and coast through with momentum while racheting or spinning as needed.
    Bingo. Carry enough speed over rocky stuff so you don't have to pedal - that should help keep the cranks horizontal. But like he said, sometimes you have to ratchet. Maybe you stopped briefly to pick a line or you're on a bit of an uphill slope or something. In that case you're best bet is to ratchet the pedals.
    "With that said, until you have done a STR group ride- YOU HAVE NOT LIVED!"
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  9. #9
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    he's right about the placement, i use this technique on my home trail in a particular hairy area that i use to walk the bike down on. yesterday was pobably the 30th time i have ridden that section and there was a runner coming up so i slowed to give him room and me the time i needed to stay on the bike and still attack the garden. well too slow through the front half and i started ratcheting, got too far forward on the bike, front tire had no momentum over the rock in front of me and instantly i was sailing in slow motion over the handle bars. that technique usually works, you just have to refine it, oh and hope that you aren't on an out and back trail and have traffic coming at you. the bike is fine but my juicy carbon brake levers don't look as nice as they use to.

  10. #10
    Who is John Galt?
    Reputation: Big Jim Mac's Avatar
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    Well I just learned something. That ratcheting technique would work wonders. Where I have problems is going uphill in rock gardens. You can't coast so you have to crank and wham!

    Glad to see someone else has wrecked their Yeti. I wasn't going to mention this, but I missed the ramp on a tree stunt last night, smaked into the tree itself and did a complete flip with my shoes still clipped in, landed flat on my back. I had 2 liters or so in the Camelback and that took the full force of me and the bike but didn't burst. Bike did a couple flips when my shoes finally pulled free, can't find a scratch on it. That's pretty good powder coat!
    What, me hurry?

  11. #11
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    Haha, that'd funny but I'm sure glad you're fine. I'll tell you this- the Speedplay Frogs are the only pedals I've tried that release like magic. They are designed to release when you lift your heel up enough (as in the start of a endo or fly-over-the-ber situation.

    I can't use any other pedals. Due to how my feet turn in and general lack of coordination, I found myslef attached to my pedals and not able to get out. So I tried the Frogs and have endo-ed and flown over the bars a few times. Each time, my shoes clip out without any input from me- besides the action of my heel lifting up enough. Just a tip for those who are getting frustrated with their current pedals. I can't get out well enough with Times or Eggbeaters- my latest ones before the Frogs.

  12. #12
    Who is John Galt?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flyer
    Haha, that'd funny but I'm sure glad you're fine. I'll tell you this- the Speedplay Frogs are the only pedals I've tried that release like magic. They are designed to release when you lift your heel up enough (as in the start of a endo or fly-over-the-ber situation.

    I can't use any other pedals. Due to how my feet turn in and general lack of coordination, I found myslef attached to my pedals and not able to get out. So I tried the Frogs and have endo-ed and flown over the bars a few times. Each time, my shoes clip out without any input from me- besides the action of my heel lifting up enough. Just a tip for those who are getting frustrated with their current pedals. I can't get out well enough with Times or Eggbeaters- my latest ones before the Frogs.
    You're from Kansas right? Do you know Greg Horstmeier? He's always telling me about his friends in Kansas who pedal Frogs, says they are the best for mud which they must have in abundance wherever it is he rides, somebody's farm in the central-west section. I just switched from SPDs, mud was the big issue plus the tiny footprint made my flat feet ache. Suspect the Speedplays would be the same, Time seems to give me more to stand on. I'll tell you one thing, you don't want these pedals to hit you in the shins, Time put a nice point on the front that left me with a hole in my leg recently.
    What, me hurry?

  13. #13
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    I don't think I know Greg. Mud isn't an issue for me- I hate riding in the stuff. The Speedplay Frogs have no spring tension so it works well for me. A solid rock hit unclips on foot on a rare occasion but hasn't created any disasters. I just found that I can't run anything with any sort of spring tension so I stick with the Frogs. BTW, I have flat feet too. I wasn't blessed with good ankles or feet.

    I like the quality and concept of the Times- I just could not get out of them fast or instictively enough.

  14. #14
    "El Whatever"
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    Like Flyer said... ratcheting is the key with bikes with low BB height, long cranks, or high rocks... whatever it happens first .

    The perfect excuse to get a high-end multiple engagement points rear hub like the Hope Bulb, DT 240 or CK's... if you haven't already.

    This will make ratcheting a dream come true.

    Best of lucks!
    Sick bike...
    Check my Site

  15. #15
    Who is John Galt?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Warp
    Like Flyer said... ratcheting is the key with bikes with low BB height, long cranks, or high rocks... whatever it happens first .

    The perfect excuse to get a high-end multiple engagement points rear hub like the Hope Bulb, DT 240 or CK's... if you haven't already.

    This will make ratcheting a dream come true.

    Best of lucks!
    Sick bike...

    Hmmmmm...been wondering what the next bling would be for me. Makes sense.
    What, me hurry?

  16. #16
    In my mind, I can do it!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Jim Mac
    I finally found something I don't like about the 575. When I ride the technical spots I am smaking the pedals a lot on rocks. Maybe I have too much sag? I measured when I got back and seated on the bike there is only about 6 inches or less between the bottom of the pedal and the ground. I know I need to get the pedals in the horizontal position when rocks come by but sometimes you have to give it that pedal to get over something. Is the BB height too low for this bike? I did add more air to the shock mid-ride, running about 190 now which is about my weight. I notice too I am using all the travel, set the O-ring before I started, but I did nail a pretty good jump so that may have bottomed it.
    Funny, I have found the opposite to be true for me. My last bike had a low bottom bracket and this is way better. I guess I got used to having to deal with that on the last bike so this seems so much better.

    I can see how the sag would be an issue though. You have to work the suspension in your favor with obsticles. If you compress when you should decompress I can see how that will be a problem. So far I have cleared things that on my old bike never would have. I'm happy!

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flyer
    Haha, that'd funny but I'm sure glad you're fine. I'll tell you this- the Speedplay Frogs are the only pedals I've tried that release like magic. They are designed to release when you lift your heel up enough (as in the start of a endo or fly-over-the-ber situation.
    funny, my first ride on my frogs I clipped a tree with my bar and crashed, the pedals released like magic all right - the little wings on the sides of the cleats broke off, both wings, both cleats. Speedplay where cool about replacing them (seriously, I only had about 3 miles on them when they broke).

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