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Thread: Jekyll vs 575

  1. #1
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    Jekyll vs 575

    Hello,

    I've been riding an 04 Jekyll with a Swinger 3-way frame shock for a few years now and have been quite happy with this versatile rig. Never had a lefty, just not convinced about the merits, and run a Vanilla 125r or Fox FX100. I've raced it on a local East Coast race called the Jay Challenge for 73 miles and taken her off a drop or two. But, the Swingers sprung a leak, the frame is bent and might be time for a new ride.

    So, has anyone out there spent some time on a Jekyll and care to compare it to aYeti 575

    Thanks
    [SIZE="3"]"To Air Is Human, To Huck Divine" [/SIZE]

  2. #2
    Bad Case of the Mondays
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cielo
    So, has anyone out there spent some time on a Jekyll and care to compare it to aYeti 575
    I owned a Jekyll before my 575, rode it for about 3 years. I wasn't really thrilled with it in its stock form, but the addition of a TALAS fork and a PUSH'd rear shock and it turned into a pretty trusty steed. It was kind of a before-its-time "all mountain" bike really.

    I noticed pretty severe stiffening of the rear suspension under hard braking on steep terrain. Also, I didn't think it pedaled through the rough stough overly well either. It was a good all-around performer, but not just outstanding at anything.

    After a year on the 575, I would think I would be qualified to comment on the two bikes.

    First the 575's suspension is more active in climbing and descending, and feels noticeably more alive. The 575s suspension action feels much more refined than the Jekyll. With the Jekyll, I always had to either sacrifice small bump or pedaling performance, but I find a much happier medium on the 575.

    Descending the 575 holds a significant advantage as well, again due to what I feel like is a more active suspension system. I don't get the "brake jack" that I had on the Jekyll at all, and the travel difference (my Jekyll was the older, less travel model) is certainly noticeable.

    And as for pedaling, I don't know if its due to the RP3 or the linkage system, but I get virtually no pedal bob on the 575 under climbing but the small bump performance is still very good. Even with my Jekyll sporting a PUSH'd float rear shock, the pedal bob is more controlled on the 575.

    I never really bought into, nor used, the adjustable geometry of the Jekyll, but the 575 feels like it could be pushed a lot further. When I sold my Jekyll I felt my riding had pretty much outgrown the Jekyll but even after a year I feel like the 575 still could be pushed much harder than I've done thus far.

    Both are good bikes, but the 575 just feels much more refined and polished.

    Does that cover it? If not feel free to post some specific questions and I'll try to answer them as best I can.

  3. #3
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    Jdub, Thanks for a comprehensive reply.

    One thing I do like about my jekyll is the geometry. I find climbing steep technical trails doesn't require much body re-positioning. And, technical downhills just require a some leaning back with not worrying about pinching the front end on a rock. Does the 575 require much body english?

    Also, just heard of a friend buddy cracking his 575. We have a similiar riding style and hit the same terrain so are cracks common?

    Steve
    [SIZE="3"]"To Air Is Human, To Huck Divine" [/SIZE]

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cielo
    One thing I do like about my jekyll is the geometry. I find climbing steep technical trails doesn't require much body re-positioning. And, technical downhills just require a some leaning back with not worrying about pinching the front end on a rock. Does the 575 require much body english?
    The short answer is not anymore. When I first switched to the 575 I had to readjust my climbing style a bit, and change my stem from a 110x15 to a 90x0. After the stem change, I can climb with my Pike at 140mm without problems, and climbing at 110mm it feels like a XC bike.

    Downhills, the 575 feels much more stable. I had a problem keeping from endo'ing on really steep stuff on my Jekyll (TALAS up front), but no such problems with the slacker HA on the 575.

    Quote Originally Posted by Cielo
    Also, just heard of a friend buddy cracking his 575. We have a similiar riding style and hit the same terrain so are cracks common?
    I broke my Jekyll twice, but after a year of riding up and down the Front Range in Colorado with numerous ski resort lift days this summer and my 575 is holding up fine. Even at 200lbs I'm not worried about it, especially since its got a 5 year warranty which will easily be longer than the amount of time I'll keep it.

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