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  1. #1
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    How is AS-R sl as all around trial bike?

    Reviews seem to indicate it is a good bike for both uphill and downhill. My rides are between 1 to 2 hours on single track--most of the uphill with no big hits--just typical single track ruts and rocks.

  2. #2
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    Very nice bike- fast and easy to climb on and build up light if needed. It's really an efficient machine while being plush enough for almost anything. It really pedals well. If you weigh over 200 lbs though, consider something slightly beefier. That's my opinion anyway. I am 185 lbs and loved this bike while I had it.

  3. #3
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    I agree with Flyer, an excellent bike!
    I have had mine for a little over a month, pro kit rocks!, and weigh 220 lbs. I am coming from a hardtail background so to me this is plush. I raced it a the 24 hours- actually 9 hours of Moab- 2 weeks ago and it was perfect for there and Slick Rock & Porcupine Rim. I live in Socal and it's great for the trails here, a little more travel would be nice for some of the longer downhills but going up it is perfect.
    I highly recommend this bike!!!
    What is thy bidding, my master.

  4. #4
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    Ace. From my perspective - coming off a Yeti Arc, the ASR is an awesome all around bike. Although not as quick in the tight stuff as the ARC, the ASR is still fast and nimble through the woods, better over rocky sections, climbs similar to the ARC. My riding style/position has changed to take advantage of the suspension but I think any hard tail to suspension transition would make you do that. Don't really notice the weight increase - I think reduced fatigue has offset that issue.
    Le Tour de Tick MTB Race every April - 04/25/10 www.missouritrailssociety.blogspot.com

  5. #5
    mutaullyassuredsuffering
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    Great bike!

    I use it as my race and training bike. I think it is one of the fastest race bikes around, but I also enjoy it on all my local singletrack. It's survived some nasty hits and drops, and is plenty plush for me. I've tried to run a 5" bike for training and fun, but it always feels too slow. Just protect the chainstays and you will be fine.

  6. #6
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    Personally, i wouldn't think it would make a very good Trial bike. Trails shoud be fine though

  7. #7
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    It would not make a good Trials bike at all. Hey, how much do you weigh? If you're approaching 200 lbs, it may make sense to look at something a bit beefier. Just a thought since I have no idea how much you weigh.

  8. #8
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    The ASR is a great trail bike when outfitted with a 100 mm fork to slacken up the angles a tad. The suspension is very active and will really help to relieve fatigue on longer rides.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by cRock
    The ASR is a great trail bike when outfitted with a 100 mm fork to slacken up the angles a tad. The suspension is very active and will really help to relieve fatigue on longer rides.
    The AS-R is designed for a 100 mm fork, so putting on a 100mm fork doesn't slacken the angles at all. As an aside, I really don't understand why anyone would put a 130mm fork on an AS-R. Just buy a 575.

    Anyway, the AS-R is a great trail bike, though. I race mine, train on it and use it as my fun bike. Outside of hucking (which I don't do) there is nothing the bike can't do with aplomb. There's no other bike I'd rather be riding in any circumstance.

  10. #10
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    Back in the day, many used to race it with a 80mm fork. I rode mine with a 100mm fork and liked it a lot. I think a racer on smooth and twisty trails may benefit from a 80mm fork but not most of us. It woud simply get us into trouble. I used to be around 170 lbs since I was a runner at the time I had my ASR-SL. Now I'm around 185 so I'm on a Beefier 4" travel bike but I still would consider an ASR-SL, especially if I wanted to start racing next year.

  11. #11
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    I am 6'1" 215. i ride a medium ASRsl.

    i put an RP23 and an 07 Talus on mine. Mine is a 03 Ti pivot alu chainstay.

    The asr handels really well in 100mm mode, almost magical.

    It took a little getting used to, but in 140mm mode, you can still really mob through some nasty stuff. DH bikes are really forgiving when handling through nasty single track, this one can work well, but you have to get the weight forward and pay attention.

    I would not jump the bike more than about 2 feet.
    I am a yeti addict, 8 in all:
    Currently built:
    ASR-SL, 575, DH9, Road Project, FRO
    Currently in Pieces:
    ASX, Lawill-6,ARC

  12. #12
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    It's a great riding bike, and good for racing too. If you like to go up and down fast, it's a great choice.

    As far as the 80 vs 100mm debate. There is no way I would put a 80mm fork on that bike, and I race.
    Last edited by mtbfool; 11-30-2006 at 03:55 PM.

  13. #13
    mutaullyassuredsuffering
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    115!

    Quote Originally Posted by mtbfool
    It's a great riding bike, and good for racing too. If you like to go up and down fast, it's a great choice.

    As far as the 80 vs 100mm debate. There is now way I would put a 80mm fork on that bike, and I race.
    I've got a 115mm fork and a poplock on mine now and it still steers quickly. The extra 1cm (5mm more sag now) made very little discernable difference to me after I lowered my stem 1 cm. I wish I was a tough guy who could ride a hardtail with an 80mm fork but it will never happen....

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