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  1. #1
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    How bad of an idea?!

    So I have a '12 ASRc with a 120mm fork on it. I'd really like to get into the enduro race scene when I move out to Oregon. I know the bike is designed for a max fork length of 120, but I'd love to run a bike with 140. Looking at the geometry and all angles, the bike is identical to the ASR5c (except for the rear travel). The ASR5c can run a 140 though. So, would it be terrible to run the ASRc with a 140 (maybe 130) on the front?

    I've also compared it to the Blur TRc and Intense Carbine SL (set at 120 setting).

    Anyone want to trade me a 5c or 575?!

  2. #2
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    I get really, really nervous about the idea of running anything longer than the length of fork a frame was designed around. That bike was probably tested and designed to take a lot of abuse...within the original design parameters. And, front-end failures are not a lot of fun (I've got a lot of hardware in my shoulder as evidence).

    BTW: where in our great state are you moving?
    Keith in Corvallis

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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by OregonSS View Post
    BTW: where in our great state are you moving?
    Yeah, I don't think it's the best idea (but would mean keeping the wife happier since I won't be selling and buying another bike).

    I'll be moving to Bend. Just have to get the house here in the Denver area up for sale. Hoping to be up there early June if all goes well.

  4. #4
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    Honestly I doubt an additional 20mm of fork length would be enough to make a front end failure likely.

    How much do you weigh? Chances are that a 220 lb dude rallying a ASR-C with a 120mm fork is much more likely to experience a frame failure than a 160 lb fellow with a 140mm fork.

  5. #5
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    I'm about 175 if I ride with a pack (rare). Usually just a bottle on the bike and one in jersey pocket if a longer ride.

  6. #6
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    Just don't forget that you'd be changing the headtube angle by about a degree, which changes the leverage.

    Congrats on the move--Bend is awesome! I'm a Colorado native as well, but I never plan on going back!
    Keith in Corvallis

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  7. #7
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    How bad of an idea?!

    My experience has been that the rear suspension is doing more of the hard work than the fork is. Keep your 120 fork and have your shock gone through by PUSH for your riding style and I'd think the bike will be much better balanced than choppered out with a 140 and an over worked shock.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by KrisRayner View Post
    My experience has been that the rear suspension is doing more of the hard work than the fork is. Keep your 120 fork and have your shock gone through by PUSH for your riding style and I'd think the bike will be much better balanced than choppered out with a 140 and an over worked shock.
    Thanks Kris! Yeah, I think I'm going to avoid choppering it out. I'll stick with it at 120. Maybe I can talk my wife into letting me get a 575.

  9. #9
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    I wouldn't do it. You'll screw up the head angle and the bike will handle like dog poop. The other difference between ASR5 and ASRc is the ASR5 has a tapered head tube. The ASRc does not.

  10. #10
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    Also, in terms of using your ASR for enduro racing: Do it! Let's not forget that the idea of enduro racing was to get back to the soul of our sport--hanging out in the woods with your buddies, socializing on the way up, and racing (for fun!) on the way down.Just because a handful of people have gotten entirely too serious about it, and a market has emerged around gear "optimized for enduro racing" doesn't mean you shouldn't show up with the bike you usually ride, crack a beer, and rip!

    I think about how I got in to riding singlespeeds as a way of having a simpler experience on my trails and to hang out with like-minded fun-hogs. Now every leg-shaving CAT-3 has one in their quiver as a training tool. Sigh.
    Keith in Corvallis

    Yeti SB-95 Race
    Yeti Big Top Race
    Niner SIR 9 SS
    Foundry Auger
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