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  1. #1
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    First Yeti, First 29 - thanks to those who helped.

    Just wanted to say thanks quick to those who helped with some some Yeti questions regarding size and other details.

    I thought I was going to buy a frame and build the bike up over the winter for a fun project, but ended up finding a '13 SB 95 Race dealer demo at a price I couldn't pass up.

    The demo I bought was pretty clean - typical nicks, etc, but overall pretty good. I didn't like the matte finish of the silver, so I buffed the whole frame out to a glossy finish (which you can somewhat tell from the photo).

    I'm going to add a drop post (if you want to speak up regarding a preference that would be great), convert to tubeless + new tires, service the fork (and probably set it up to 140mm)...that's probably about it.

    I was thrown off at the weight of this bike - it's heavier than I thought it would be. But other than going tubeless, I'm not even sure where I can drop more weight, other than buying a set of wheels that I really don't need. Planning to just ride it and then judge from there.

    Thanks again - looking forward to next season. First Yeti, First 29 - thanks to those who helped.-20131217-_mg_7652.jpg

  2. #2
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    Congrats!

    Put a bit of friction tape on the back of the seat tube where the rear tire comes close, just in case you get tire-bottom-out. It can happen. It won't be enough to do anything other than scrub the finish but it can happen.

    Nice job on the polish. Pretty, I can tell (as I have the silver myself).

    Don't worry about the overall weight, you won't really notice it much on the trail.

    Converting to tubeless: If you have the stock DT rims (like came with my '12 bike) then you can use either the Stan's rubber strips or a couple loops of 1" Gorilla Tape to convert the rims. The latter is easy-peasy. I found that just using Stan's Yellow tape wasn't good enough.

    I cut a section of old tire and bolted it on the down-tube on the bottom, from the water-bottle bosses, and zip-tied the back near the BB. This cuts down on rock-hit noise quite a bit where I live (loose rocks kicking up into the frame).

    Watch out for the rear brake line rubbing against the black yoke. I used a zip tie to snug it to the vertical spar on the rear triangle.

    The MRP XCG works great as a bash guard and is compatible with 3x setup (or two or 1...). You can get the ISCG-05 mount plate adapter for the frame from Jenson USA (or other sources). It's the same as the SB66 uses, goes on the frame splines behind the drive-side BB cup.

    I don't know/remember your weight, but if you're in the neighborhood of 200# you may want to get and put the smallest Fox Volume Spacer into the shock. It made the balance of sag/sensitivity/bottom-out handling much better for me. I found the medium/large spacers made the progression ramp-up too much.

    Dropper? That's a Religious Issue around these parts I'm sure. All I'll say is the Specialized Command Post Blacklite on my works fine, and worked well with the top-tube routing. I did put some friction tape on the frame to prevent the dropper post from rubbing paint.

    I meant to add: the single best weight-management location is the wheels and tires. The stock rims are fairly light though, so short of going carbon I don't see much weight loss there. BUT tubeless + right tire choice can make a huge difference. I found the stock Ardent/Ikon combo to work pretty well as a fast-tire set. I ride more durable tires (On-One Chunky Monkey and Smorgasboard ... which are in fact made by Maxxis I understand) and don't mind the slowdown as I prefer not to buy new tires every month.

  3. #3
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    First Yeti, First 29 - thanks to those who helped.

    I have the same bike, same build. I'm running a KS Lev dropper post and am very pleased with it.

    As far as dropping weight, ditch the front d. by converting to a 1x10.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by bear View Post
    Congrats!

    Put a bit of friction tape on the back of the seat tube where the rear tire comes close, just in case you get tire-bottom-out. It can happen. It won't be enough to do anything other than scrub the finish but it can happen.

    Nice job on the polish. Pretty, I can tell (as I have the silver myself).

    Don't worry about the overall weight, you won't really notice it much on the trail.

    Converting to tubeless: If you have the stock DT rims (like came with my '12 bike) then you can use either the Stan's rubber strips or a couple loops of 1" Gorilla Tape to convert the rims. The latter is easy-peasy. I found that just using Stan's Yellow tape wasn't good enough.

    I cut a section of old tire and bolted it on the down-tube on the bottom, from the water-bottle bosses, and zip-tied the back near the BB. This cuts down on rock-hit noise quite a bit where I live (loose rocks kicking up into the frame).

    Watch out for the rear brake line rubbing against the black yoke. I used a zip tie to snug it to the vertical spar on the rear triangle.

    The MRP XCG works great as a bash guard and is compatible with 3x setup (or two or 1...). You can get the ISCG-05 mount plate adapter for the frame from Jenson USA (or other sources). It's the same as the SB66 uses, goes on the frame splines behind the drive-side BB cup.

    I don't know/remember your weight, but if you're in the neighborhood of 200# you may want to get and put the smallest Fox Volume Spacer into the shock. It made the balance of sag/sensitivity/bottom-out handling much better for me. I found the medium/large spacers made the progression ramp-up too much.

    Dropper? That's a Religious Issue around these parts I'm sure. All I'll say is the Specialized Command Post Blacklite on my works fine, and worked well with the top-tube routing. I did put some friction tape on the frame to prevent the dropper post from rubbing paint.

    I meant to add: the single best weight-management location is the wheels and tires. The stock rims are fairly light though, so short of going carbon I don't see much weight loss there. BUT tubeless + right tire choice can make a huge difference. I found the stock Ardent/Ikon combo to work pretty well as a fast-tire set. I ride more durable tires (On-One Chunky Monkey and Smorgasboard ... which are in fact made by Maxxis I understand) and don't mind the slowdown as I prefer not to buy new tires every month.
    Yeah I've done the Gorilla-Tape-Ghetto-Tubeless setup on two sets of wheels without any issues at all, and plan to do that again with this one.

    Thanks for the tips - that was going to be my next question. With my last bike, I put clear vinyl all over it, which I plan to do with this one, to prevent the things you're making mention of.

    I don't plan on the bash-guard - maybe a chain guide if anything.

    (I'm 170 before gear).

    I've had two of the Giant Contact Switch drop posts, but ... they are decent, and cheap, but the camber does not stay in place if you have your body weight on the seat in the lowered position (hit an abrupt bump and it'll move). That is really annoying. The KS Lev seems to be the most reliable with the best reviews. Not too worried about that right now; I'll look around for deals. I like the idea of the hydraulic button of the Reverb, but reviews don't fare so well.

    And yes, I always pay attention to tire weight. Never used to, but there is a lot of rotating mass (unsprung weight) to deal with, and tire weights can vary a lot. With my previous 26, I ran Continental Mountain King II up front / X-King in back with bullet proof success, and they were a ton lighter than anything, other than Nobby Nics (which failed for me).

    But now with the 29, the Maxxis Ardent / Ikon is actually lighter than Continental's 29 sizes which was surprising to me. I plan to run Ardents on the front and back, then maybe to the Ikon for summer. I like a more aggressive back tire for braking; did some testing this fall and it was a huge difference in speeds.BTW, its funny how narrow the 29 2.4 Ardent looks visually compared to the 26 version (which is huge).

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by breed007 View Post
    I have the same bike, same build. I'm running a KS Lev dropper post and am very pleased with it.

    As far as dropping weight, ditch the front d. by converting to a 1x10.
    Kinda thought about the 1x10, but I'm not man enough to handle that with the big climbs we have around here (Northern Utah). Most of the time I can stay in the top ring, but I would be miserable at times.

  6. #6
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    I've been trying a narrow-wide chainring with a clutched rear derailleur, and no guide, and it's been good so far.

    In fact, it works so well, I cut the top of the fin off the MRP AMG I have, converting it into a more-sturdy XCG.

    But, if you do a guide that has a tall back plate, or top guide, be careful of interference with the rear-triangle.

    WRT: tire width of ardent 2.4, were the rims the same inner width? I haven't put the 29er vs the 26er lately so dunno if the casings are the same shape though.

  7. #7
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    First Yeti, First 29 - thanks to those who helped.

    Quote Originally Posted by KGAmoto View Post
    Kinda thought about the 1x10, but I'm not man enough to handle that with the big climbs we have around here (Northern Utah). Most of the time I can stay in the top ring, but I would be miserable at times.
    Understandable. I live in the Midwest so it's a different ballgame. But if you're curious, you can make the conversion for pretty cheap. I'm running a Wolf Tooth 32t chain ring with the rest stock XT drivetrain. No chain guide. Works great. Cost me about $70-80 with the chain ring and bolts.

  8. #8
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    Also wondering: for '14 the alloy frames are coming with the carbon rear triangle. I wonder if Yeti will make this available for purchase? It's a fairly decent amount of weight to drop (300g). But it would all depend how it's priced.

    I'm curious to try a 1x10 - maybe a 32t will be a feasible happy medium. Not sure though - most of my rides can get pretty steep - 2500 to 3500 feet of climbing in 15-20 miles is pretty average. How significant is the weight drop?

  9. #9
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    So what size did you end up with?

  10. #10
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    First Yeti, First 29 - thanks to those who helped.

    Quote Originally Posted by KGAmoto View Post
    Also wondering: for '14 the alloy frames are coming with the carbon rear triangle. I wonder if Yeti will make this available for purchase? It's a fairly decent amount of weight to drop (300g). But it would all depend how it's priced.

    I'm curious to try a 1x10 - maybe a 32t will be a feasible happy medium. Not sure though - most of my rides can get pretty steep - 2500 to 3500 feet of climbing in 15-20 miles is pretty average. How significant is the weight drop?
    I didn't weigh it before and after. But you're dropping the front d, cable, shifter and two chainrings. It's significant. Also, Wolf Tooth makes a 30t that will work with the XT crank too. I was considering buying one to use when I'm out west but haven't been since I converted it.

    Personally, I think I'll be fine with the 32t on the Colorado front range. We'll see this summer.

  11. #11
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    Congrats on your new ride!

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by eurospek View Post
    So what size did you end up with?
    I went with a Large. I demo'd both back to back and they both felt pretty good. Mediums usually feel pretty small, but they both felt right at home. The big-savings-deal though was the demo Race build, and they only had that in a Large, so I ran with it. If I somehow don't gel with it, I bought it cheap enough I'm sure i can sell it next season if need be and not be out a dime for the experiment.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by CoastalYeti View Post
    Congrats on your new ride!
    Thanks - pumped to finally have a Yeti.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by KGAmoto View Post
    Also wondering: for '14 the alloy frames are coming with the carbon rear triangle. I wonder if Yeti will make this available for purchase? It's a fairly decent amount of weight to drop (300g). But it would all depend how it's priced.
    I don't think it's worth the $ that it'd be for a straight purchase, but if/when I ever need a rear triangle replacement I'd ask to upgrade then.

    I think that's money better spent on lighter wheels.

    Now, if you've got serious coin burning a hole in your pocket I'm sure a call to Yeti from your LBS could answer the question.

    FWIW on the 1x10 "issue" ... I'm running a RaceFace Narrow-Wide ring, 32t, with largest rear cog 36t and a Shimano Zee rear derailleur, and it works pretty well for me. If I was worried about serious hills I'd consider a 30t ring though (and I may, if I travel out of state in early spring).

  15. #15
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    Another congrats on the ride!

    Although standing next to the bike and lifting it off the ground seems like a heavy bike, it certainly does not ride like a heavy bike. I ride in very similar conditions as you too...CO Rockies.

    My favorite mods so far...dropped the large chainring for a bashguard (now running 2X w/ BG), made the proper FD adjustment, removed a chain link and swapped the RD for the Shadow + version with the clutch. Those changes rid the bike of persistent chain slap.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by bear View Post
    I don't think it's worth the $ that it'd be for a straight purchase, but if/when I ever need a rear triangle replacement I'd ask to upgrade then.

    I think that's money better spent on lighter wheels.

    Now, if you've got serious coin burning a hole in your pocket I'm sure a call to Yeti from your LBS could answer the question.

    FWIW on the 1x10 "issue" ... I'm running a RaceFace Narrow-Wide ring, 32t, with largest rear cog 36t and a Shimano Zee rear derailleur, and it works pretty well for me. If I was worried about serious hills I'd consider a 30t ring though (and I may, if I travel out of state in early spring).
    Now I'm really curious to try the 1x10. The more I think about it, I'm almost always on the top ring (with my previous 2x10 bike (26 / 38)) with the exception of a few nasty climbs. It makes pretty good sense - losing a bunch of noisy mechanical stuff to a setup where your chain is better-aligned almost all of the time, plus the other benefits.

    This bike already has the Shadow Plus clutch RD. You can buy those RaceFace rings on eBay for $40 shipped. I might try it out this spring.

  17. #17
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    Oh, the other thing to consider on the 1x10 is that there are a couple ways now to add a "larger than 36t" cog the back, dropping one of the cogs in the middle of the cluster (or possibly just the smallest - 11t or 12t). I may get one for my parts bin just because I like innovation and trying things.

    Absolute Black article: AbsoluteBlack Teases 40-Tooth Cassette Cog

    OneUp article : Exclusive: Take Your 11-36 Cassette to the Next Level with OneUp Components? 42t Sprocket
    - follow-up : UPDATED with First Impressions: OneUp?s Cassette Changing, XX1 Challenging 42t Adapter Sprocket

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by bear View Post
    Oh, the other thing to consider on the 1x10 is that there are a couple ways now to add a "larger than 36t" cog the back, dropping one of the cogs in the middle of the cluster (or possibly just the smallest - 11t or 12t). I may get one for my parts bin just because I like innovation and trying things.

    Absolute Black article: AbsoluteBlack Teases 40-Tooth Cassette Cog

    OneUp article : Exclusive: Take Your 11-36 Cassette to the Next Level with OneUp Components? 42t Sprocket
    - follow-up : UPDATED with First Impressions: OneUp?s Cassette Changing, XX1 Challenging 42t Adapter Sprocket
    Thank you. Also, MTBR has an article on the OneUp on their index page right now too actually.

    I'm kinda excited to try it. It'll be nice to focus solely on the cassette for once, and really, you could get a 30 and 32t front ring, and just swap them out accordingly, depending on how gnarly you plan your day to be. I think I'll start with a 32. But spring has to get here first. I almost went out yesterday to hit some snow (packed roads / trail), but couldn't and now we are getting bombed on with more snow.

  19. #19
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    First Yeti, First 29 - thanks to those who helped.

    Quote Originally Posted by KGAmoto View Post
    Thank you. Also, MTBR has an article on the OneUp on their index page right now too actually.

    I'm kinda excited to try it. It'll be nice to focus solely on the cassette for once, and really, you could get a 30 and 32t front ring, and just swap them out accordingly, depending on how gnarly you plan your day to be. I think I'll start with a 32. But spring has to get here first. I almost went out yesterday to hit some snow (packed roads / trail), but couldn't and now we are getting bombed on with more snow.
    I would rather push my bike occasionally than go back (not that I've had to). It's that good.

  20. #20
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    Great looking bike KGA , I bet you are so stoked I love that finish on the bike .
    Can't wait for you to get in a ride !!

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by kelstr View Post
    Great looking bike KGA , I bet you are so stoked I love that finish on the bike .
    Can't wait for you to get in a ride !!
    Thank you. I'm hoping to do some snow-mtb'ing tomorrow and Sunday.

  22. #22
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    Finally got out today for the first time; terrible conditions to really get any idea what the bike is like, but I just wanted to burn the lungs for a while. surprisingly, the snow was more rideable than I expected, and a good grind.

    I'm not sure if the frame really is too big for me, or the new-to-me 29" wheels are making the bike feel pretty big (I really think its the wheels, and maybe a tad bit frame-size-related, but seat height to body position to arm-reach, feel spot-on) but it definitely, and of course, felt different.

    The photos don't show any dirt, but there actually was quite a bit of exposed wet sand to ride. Bike felt good overall - doesn't feel too big in a sense, but it will just take me a while to get used to the wheels. Am I right in saying that the wheels really make it feel like you're on a bigger bike (in reference to an optical illusion-of-sorts)? Makes sense I guess.

    First Yeti, First 29 - thanks to those who helped.-img_9174.jpgFirst Yeti, First 29 - thanks to those who helped.-img_9175.jpgFirst Yeti, First 29 - thanks to those who helped.-img_9178.jpg
    Last edited by KGAmoto; 12-26-2013 at 08:40 AM.

  23. #23
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    This 95 is also my first 29er I owned .
    I will say the larger rotating wheel with more contact to the ground does make for a slightly different feel , .......its funny but my 95 is 1 1/2 " shorter wheel base than my 26er Enduro , but because of the extra 3" larger diameter wheel I get the feel of a longer bike even tho its a shorter wheelbase .

    These were my thoughts while putting many of my first hrs on the 95 , then also when initiating turns , as I counter steered the bike quickly over while keeping my body straight the extra traction is really welcome compared to the skidish 26er that would want to push and cause me to rear brake slide to get the 26er around.
    So I really like the grip and trail feel of the 95

    But the 29er being a taller wheel and a taller ft end does have slightly more distance to travel to get it laid over.

    So this is my take on what Im feeling , its only slightly different but it does take an adjustment period to get used to the differences .

    I had no idea you could ride on snow , that has got to take a lot of cardio to keep a bike moving in the snow I would think, those are great shots you got and your 95 looks really nice !

    I hope you get some sunny dry weather to give your new ride some good testing .

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by kelstr View Post
    This 95 is also my first 29er I owned .
    I will say the larger rotating wheel with more contact to the ground does make for a slightly different feel , .......its funny but my 95 is 1 1/2 " shorter wheel base than my 26er Enduro , but because of the extra 3" larger diameter wheel I get the feel of a longer bike even tho its a shorter wheelbase .

    These were my thoughts while putting many of my first hrs on the 95 , then also when initiating turns , as I counter steered the bike quickly over while keeping my body straight the extra traction is really welcome compared to the skidish 26er that would want to push and cause me to rear brake slide to get the 26er around.
    So I really like the grip and trail feel of the 95

    But the 29er being a taller wheel and a taller ft end does have slightly more distance to travel to get it laid over.

    So this is my take on what Im feeling , its only slightly different but it does take an adjustment period to get used to the differences .

    I had no idea you could ride on snow , that has got to take a lot of cardio to keep a bike moving in the snow I would think, those are great shots you got and your 95 looks really nice !

    I hope you get some sunny dry weather to give your new ride some good testing .
    I went out again today - the weather has been pretty stable and around 30 daily, so I was actually able to ride quite a bit today. You'd be really surprised how well you can ride on hard-packed snow too; there were sections today that were 100% snow - you can actually carry decent speed, but you need to be careful cornering (obviously). Otherwise it's really surprising how well the bike works on snow (Maxxis Ardent up front / Ikon in back, with less than 25psi in each). I need to get another Ardent for the back for this time of year though.

    Still not sure about sizing - the cockpit feels right. The only thing slightly making me think "Medium over Large" is the fact that on my Large, my saddle is just about dead-even with my bars (stem has one 7mm spacer under) to get the right seat-to-pedal feel. Maybe that's normal and ok - I need to go out and look at my previous 26r to see if the setup was the same. Maybe it means nothing. It's such a night-and-day different bike from my previous one, it's impossible to compare the setup.

    I'd also like to adjust the fork out to 140mm but don't need the added stand-over height either....


    First Yeti, First 29 - thanks to those who helped.-photo-dec-29-4-01-32-pm.jpg


    First Yeti, First 29 - thanks to those who helped.-photo-dec-29-3-58-25-pm.jpg
    Last edited by KGAmoto; 12-29-2013 at 10:18 PM.

  25. #25
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    Changing the fork from 120 to 140 will add less than 1/2" of standover height, just FYI.

    If your previous 26er wasn't a very similar design in spirit then the cockpit setup may not be too close, e.g. if it's more of an XC race-oriented vs trail (capital-T maybe?) then it may have more of the traditional roadie-influenced bring-your-hbars-out-and-low affect.

    The more upright seating you are talking about is beneficial in many ways, however you may not be getting full hip/leg range of motion - which really is going to be more of an issue in an long ride / XC-race type situation.

    I'll need to look but I'm pretty sure my saddle height is pretty close to my h-bar height on mine and I've done some pretty long rides on it (over 40 trail miles) without issue.

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