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  1. #1
    In my mind, I can do it!
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    FasterFasterFaster

    The second ride on the 575 was better than the first. I have dialed it in pretty well now and it rides just insanely plush and efficient. I thought I was faster with on this bike but had nothing really to compare it to, until today. I went with the friends I normally ride with and I was in the groove. It is a much faster bike than my old bike. Things that sap energy like roots, ruts, bumps and logs just disappear under this bike. Before, these things would cause the old bike to bounce off of them and you would have to use your body to absorb the shock. That drains energy and slows you down. This bike takes most of the trail and eats it up passing a minimal amount of shock back up to the rider.

    So I had a lot more energy and because the bike wasn't deflecting off things I was moving faster to. My friends are normally not too far off my tail. Today... Well, I had to stop and wait for them to catch up several times.... I also wasn't spent after the ride.

    I am lovin this bike. The seatpost is going to be an issue... argh...

    Also, for those who are thinking about what fork to get... I'll make it easy for you. The Rock Shox Revelation just ROCKS. This thing feels like a Vanilla yet has less brake dive and is adjustable on everything. I put 5psi more in the neg side and 5psi less in the positive side and it just felt so plush and nice. Thats what is great about this fork. You can adjust just about anything to make it feel like you want. It is super sweet!

  2. #2
    EDR
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    My experience with the 575 was that the ride got better and better as I got used to the upright riding position, the 'plush' feeling and the handling. After about 6 or 8 rides I was in love. Sounds like you're on the same track........enjoy.

  3. #3
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    the stock seatpost collar isn't very good. My Thomson seatpost was slipping until i got a Salsa QR collar.

  4. #4
    In my mind, I can do it!
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    Quote Originally Posted by eatdrinkride
    My experience with the 575 was that the ride got better and better as I got used to the upright riding position, the 'plush' feeling and the handling. After about 6 or 8 rides I was in love. Sounds like you're on the same track........enjoy.
    Yes, the extra suspension does take some getting used to. At first I liked the ride but wasn't sure if I liked that bottomless feel of the suspension. But every time I ride I am starting to appreciate it more. Especially on this trail that I ride all the time. I know every root (there are many) along this trail and some are much more harsh than others mainly due to my fatigue from the previous ones. But now when I get to those rooted sections I am just amazed at how the bike seems to build a small bridge over the roots. It feels that way. It just rolls right over them and soaks them up. I feel less fatigued which makes me faster.

    I hope this brake noise goes away. It starts out silent (a low rub actually) and later in the ride after it gets hot I guess it will squeal like a stuck pig. Maybe it happens as dust gets in there or something. It sounds like a love sick Yeti giving it's mating call in the woods. Hopefully this will pass....

    I'll be checking ebay for a seatpost collar. Also, I hope my buttocks gets used to this WTB seat. It seems hard compared to my previous seat but I simply must have the big bright Yeti logo on it so I won't switch.

  5. #5
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    FWIW,, the first things that I replaced on my bike (within one week of the first ride) were the saddle, seatpost collar, tires and wheels... I'm glad you're digging the bike... Pretty soon, you'll be hitting the bad line just because you can...

  6. #6
    In my mind, I can do it!
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    Quote Originally Posted by flipnidaho
    FWIW,, the first things that I replaced on my bike (within one week of the first ride) were the saddle, seatpost collar, tires and wheels... I'm glad you're digging the bike... Pretty soon, you'll be hitting the bad line just because you can...
    I'll live with the saddle, change the seatpost collar, couldn't be happier with the tires... BUT.. These wheels suck. I can feel the flex and it's not the frame. The rear wheel spokes are not as taunt as the front either. There is no way I can justify to my wife that I need new wheels so I suppose I will have to wait. Maybe I can have the spokes adjusted or something.

  7. #7
    jna
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    Quote Originally Posted by iviguy
    I am lovin this bike. The seatpost is going to be an issue... argh...

    !
    Get a HOPE clamp and the issue will dissapear.

  8. #8
    Dirty Mac
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    Quote Originally Posted by iviguy
    These wheels suck. I can feel the flex and it's not the frame. The rear wheel spokes are not as taunt as the front either.
    Which wheels do you have? How do you know its not the frame?

  9. #9
    In my mind, I can do it!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dirty Mac
    Which wheels do you have? How do you know its not the frame?
    The stock wheels on the enduro kit. Mavic XM317 disk. I know it's not the frame because there is no way the frame is flexing given the kind of riding I am doing. If that were the case, no one would buy this bike and ride it under any extreem conditions. I don't think these wheels are very rigid either just by looking at them and checking the spoke tension by hand. I don't see how they could be.

    But what would one expect from a $200 wheelset? Right?

    An upgraded wheelset on the enduro would be a worthy investment.

  10. #10
    Dirty Mac
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    Quote Originally Posted by iviguy
    The stock wheels on the enduro kit. Mavic XM317 disk. I know it's not the frame because there is no way the frame is flexing given the kind of riding I am doing. If that were the case, no one would buy this bike and ride it under any extreem conditions. I don't think these wheels are very rigid either just by looking at them and checking the spoke tension by hand. I don't see how they could be.

    But what would one expect from a $200 wheelset? Right?

    An upgraded wheelset on the enduro would be a worthy investment.
    If the spoke tension is tight enough that alone might explain the wheel flex. Maybe you should try tightening up the tension a bit or have a bike shop check it.

    My Stumpy has the 517 which are probably around the same quality or less than the 317. I never had a wooble problem although with the original spokes it went out of true alot. My lbs replaced them with beefier set of spokes and they have been fine ever since.

  11. #11
    In my mind, I can do it!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dirty Mac
    If the spoke tension is tight enough that alone might explain the wheel flex. Maybe you should try tightening up the tension a bit or have a bike shop check it.

    My Stumpy has the 517 which are probably around the same quality or less than the 317. I never had a wooble problem although with the original spokes it went out of true alot. My lbs replaced them with beefier set of spokes and they have been fine ever since.
    How much did the spoke replacement cost?

  12. #12
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    proper tension

    Quote Originally Posted by iviguy
    How much did the spoke replacement cost?
    you don't need a spoke replacement. Just go ahead and have them tension the wheel correctly. Make sure it's someone that is an expert wheelbuilder and has a proper tension meter.

  13. #13
    In my mind, I can do it!
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    Quote Originally Posted by flipnidaho
    you don't need a spoke replacement. Just go ahead and have them tension the wheel correctly. Make sure it's someone that is an expert wheelbuilder and has a proper tension meter.
    Cool.. On my todo list: New seatpost clamp, bleed the J5 brakes, and have the spokes retensioned (after finding an expert wheelbuilder that is.. if there is one in this area.. )

    Oh, and order a new derailleur hanger for a spare... I'll call Will right now! Hopefully the love sick Yeti squeal will solve itself.

  14. #14
    Bad Case of the Mondays
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    Quote Originally Posted by iviguy
    Hopefully the love sick Yeti squeal will solve itself.
    If the squeal persists, there are somethings you can do.

    1. If you have the polygon rotors, bevel the edges of the rotor
    2. Get some Galfer brake pads (cheap, effective and quiet)
    3. Try realigning the calipers, often squeal can be a setup issue
    4. Get the brake tabs faced

  15. #15
    In my mind, I can do it!
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    Quote Originally Posted by iviguy
    Cool.. On my todo list: New seatpost clamp, bleed the J5 brakes, and have the spokes retensioned (after finding an expert wheelbuilder that is.. if there is one in this area.. )

    Oh, and order a new derailleur hanger for a spare... I'll call Will right now! Hopefully the love sick Yeti squeal will solve itself.
    New Salsa QR - Ordered....
    Spare Derailleur hanger - Ordered...

    That's 2 off the list!

  16. #16
    In my mind, I can do it!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jdub
    If the squeal persists, there are somethings you can do.

    1. If you have the polygon rotors, bevel the edges of the rotor
    2. Get some Galfer brake pads (cheap, effective and quiet)
    3. Try realigning the calipers, often squeal can be a setup issue
    4. Get the brake tabs faced
    #1 and #4 confuse this noob of a wrench... This probably is the "polygon" rotor since it's the Avid brand 185mm rotor. Are you saying to take a file and bevel the edges? The outermost edges I am assuming right? And #4, what are you calling the Brake Tabs?

    After searching, I don't think these are the "polygon" type.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  17. #17
    Dirty Mac
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    Quote Originally Posted by iviguy
    How much did the spoke replacement cost?
    I don't remember the cost but it wasn't that expensive. I'd first see if tensioning the spokes would stiffen up the wheel.

    The reason I changed the spokes in the first place was because they kept snapping. This was only on the rear wheel. My front wheel still has the skinny light weight spokes that came with the bike and I never had a problem with them.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by iviguy
    #1 and #4 confuse this noob of a wrench... This probably is the "polygon" rotor since it's the Avid brand 185mm rotor. Are you saying to take a file and bevel the edges? The outermost edges I am assuming right? And #4, what are you calling the Brake Tabs?

    After searching, I don't think these are the "polygon" type.

    tabs are the extensions on your Revelation that your caliper (or caliper adapter) is bolted to. When painted, these tabs may become uneven (or in my case, too brittle) and can cause a bit of vibration on the caliper (which, in some cases, sound like a squealing pig). On my Rev, I just took a file and carefully filed off the paint.

  19. #19
    Adobo Lover
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    I found tilting the nose of the rocket v saddles up to help with comfort. You really have to fiddle with the positioning to get comfortable. Some of the past threads say that the stock saddle takes a little while to break in. I ended up replacing it with the progel version when they were on sale at performancebike.com.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by iviguy
    These wheels suck. I can feel the flex and it's not the frame. The rear wheel spokes are not as taunt as the front either. There is no way I can justify to my wife that I need new wheels so I suppose I will have to wait. Maybe I can have the spokes adjusted or something.
    You sure it's not the tires? the stock Minion tires are 2.35" which are a good size bigger than my old tires on my old bike. I can feel some flex down there, and I think it's the tires. They seem kind of ballon like, and even the lugs are pretty soft. I'll probably get some different tires and compare the too.

  21. #21
    Bad Case of the Mondays
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    Quote Originally Posted by iviguy
    #1 and #4 confuse this noob of a wrench... This probably is the "polygon" rotor since it's the Avid brand 185mm rotor. Are you saying to take a file and bevel the edges? The outermost edges I am assuming right? And #4, what are you calling the Brake Tabs?

    After searching, I don't think these are the "polygon" type.
    Well #1 is more for the shuttering issue some have had with the Juicy brakes, not really a squeal thing anyway. But yes, take a file and bevel the sharp edges on the outer side of the rotor (only if you have reason to do so).

  22. #22
    Salad Days
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    Quote Originally Posted by roman
    the stock seatpost collar isn't very good. My Thomson seatpost was slipping until i got a Salsa QR collar.
    Or you can just lube the cam on the stock one when you lube your chain and clamp it tighter. Mine holds fine.

  23. #23
    surly inbred
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    Quote Originally Posted by jparker164
    Mine holds fine.
    I have to agree. I don't understand all this chatter about slipping posts. I never had an issue with mine. Only due to a fit of winter UGI did I pick up a Salsa clamp (it was waaayy cheaper than than wheelset I was eyeballing!) Actually, I would prefer the old stock clamp after nearling spearing myself on the Salsa lever on more than one occasion.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by jparker164
    Or you can just lube the cam on the stock one when you lube your chain and clamp it tighter. Mine holds fine.
    I tried this last weekend with mine and it still doesn't hold. I greased the cam and clamped it as tight as I could possibly make it, and the post still slips. I wiped the grease off the post as well and that did not help either. I am going to order a Hope clamp and hopefully that will solve the problem. The other option for me is to get a Gravity Dropper and a bolt clamp, but I can't afford that right now.

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