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  1. #1
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    Dumb question: should I lube my new seatpost before inserting it into my.....

    ....Yeti 575? I have a steel Bontrager which I lube the seatpost from time to time, but does an aluminum bike like the 575 need the same stuff?

    Signed,

    Not The Most Mechanically Inclined Rider

  2. #2
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    I'm not a mechanic, but I'm pretty sure you do. I've heard that you shouldn't in a carbon fiber bike or with a carbon fiber seatpost.

  3. #3
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    Yes, unless it is carbon and the bike is carbon.

    If both are ti then you need to use ti prep or anti-seeze

  4. #4
    ..of the masses..
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    what do you lube it with?

  5. #5
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    KY

  6. #6
    Oni
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    Grease!

    Quote Originally Posted by hagar
    what do you lube it with?
    Take your pick, most shops have a variety to choose from.

    Oni likes Rock & Roll Grease

  7. #7
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    here is an easy rule to remember: any time you have metal touching metal you need to lube it.

    not lubing is how seatposts get stuck, and you have to revert to really ugly means to get them out.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by hagar
    what do you lube it with?

    Whatever grease you have in the garage will work. All you are trying to do is eliminate potiental for noise and ensure the parts do not stick together.

  9. #9
    Who is John Galt?
    Reputation: Big Jim Mac's Avatar
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    Seems to me the problem is getting it to stay put, not sticking! I'd be afraid of lubing a seat post.
    What, me hurry?

  10. #10
    EDR
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Jim Mac
    Seems to me the problem is getting it to stay put, not sticking! I'd be afraid of lubing a seat post.

    You would think so but.....

    Grease is needed when two dissimilar metals are in contact with each other. Over time the unlike properties of the metals may cause 'molecular migration'...which simply means 'corrosion' (sort of). Once this happens the metals kinda 'bond' together and getting them apart is a minor nightmare.

    Do yourself a favor and use some grease, any kind you have in your garage, like the other poster said.

    If you move your seatpost often like I used to then bonding is not really an issue. If it stays in place for a great lenght of time, it might be....and then........good luck removing it.

  11. #11
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    [QUOTE=eatdrinkride]You would think so but.....

    Grease is needed when two dissimilar metals are in contact with each other. Over time the unlike properties of the metals may cause 'molecular migration'...which simply means 'corrosion' (sort of). Once this happens the metals kinda 'bond' together and getting them apart is a minor nightmare.

    QUOTE]
    I thought it was when two similar metals were used there is a likelihood of the metals bonding over time. Either way a little grease should not be a problem.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by eatdrinkride
    You would think so but.....

    Grease is needed when two dissimilar metals are in contact with each other. Over time the unlike properties of the metals may cause 'molecular migration'...which simply means 'corrosion' (sort of). Once this happens the metals kinda 'bond' together and getting them apart is a minor nightmare.
    Is it true of any two metals? For example, I have now a steel frame bike (Evil Sovereign) with a Diabolus seatpost and Hope collar. When I first got the bike there was no grease on the seatpost and had no issue about the seatpost sliding down while riding gnarly and bumpy trails.

    Because I know that I should add grease I did. Now the damn seatpost is always sliding down no matter how hard I compress the seat collar. That's my nightmare. I have to stop very often to raise the seat and it's very annoying so when I return home I will remove the grease.

    Thanks,
    Sylvain

  13. #13
    In my mind, I can do it!
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    Grease on the seatpost + stock Yeti seat collar = Madness, just madness....
    No grease on the seatpost + stock Yeti seat collar = Madness, but better
    Grease on the seatpost + Salsa seat post collar =
    Grease on the seatpost + Hope seat post collar =
    No grease on the seatpost + Any other decent seat post collar = NOW but could be Later if you have to remove it.

    Grease or no grease though makes no difference to me as long as it don't slip. And if you grease use a VERY slight film. Don't over grease it.

  14. #14
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    Another thing that may help is to rough up the portion of seatpost that contacts the seatcollar area with sandpaper. I have had to do this on a stem before to keep the handlebars from twisting.

  15. #15
    Hi!!!
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    Quote Originally Posted by iviguy
    Grease on the seatpost + stock Yeti seat collar = Madness, just madness....
    Boy ain't that the truth! I installed my Gravity Dropper several days ago and was hoping that the slipping was going to stop. It hasn't. Ugh. May put on some climbing chalk around the seatpost to see if that works.

    Grease on the seatpost + Salsa seat post collar =
    I have a Salsa that I haven't put on yet, cuz I ain't got a damn allen wrench that will fit.

  16. #16
    In my mind, I can do it!
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    Quote Originally Posted by fasterthanu
    Another thing that may help is to rough up the portion of seatpost that contacts the seatcollar area with sandpaper. I have had to do this on a stem before to keep the handlebars from twisting.
    Now why did you attach your seatpost to your stem again?

  17. #17
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    chalking seat post

    from another thread i cleaned, used emery cloth to rough up the seat post and then used the kids chalk - went for a ride this week and that puppy stayed put

  18. #18
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    if a greased seatpost slips continually despite the right size clamp etc you can use this cheap trick: pull out the seatpost and spread a little trail dirt over the portion that goes in the seat tube. Works wonderfully and can be reapplied at will.

  19. #19
    Who is John Galt?
    Reputation: Big Jim Mac's Avatar
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    Man, Freud would have a field day with this thread! I must be the odd one, so far no problems at all getting my stock Yeti seat and clamp to work. I don't think I need grease, I always move this thing on every ride so it's getting a good work out.
    What, me hurry?

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Evil Sylvain
    Is it true of any two metals?
    No. There is a sliding scale of galvanic corrosion. Google galvanic corrosion chart and it will show you which are more reactive with each other. Coatings, such as anodizing, also help with prevention. The metals need to be incontact with each other for the corrosion to take place.

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