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  1. #1
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    Does Yeti have a hole in their lineup?

    After about a month on the Super66 I'm really loving it as an all mountain bike, but am finding its limitations in sort of the free ride stuff. I'm not sure the 66 would do well with single crown 180 forks and sitting a bit deeper in its travel. As awesome as this bike is, I'm now wondering how a frame a bit beefier would be, something like the SX Trail, a little less trail oriented.

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    I'm sure we'll see something... Yeti is probably working on a bunch of stuff, they can only release south at one time... Maybe an SB67 or 68 is in the pipeline... Or something like the old ASX in character

    Strange they did away with the ASR 7 but could be to make room for its replacement...

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    The next model they are probably going to release will be the 303 Carbon after final World Cup testing.

    My guess is they will release an ASR-7 follow up based on the Switch technology sometime in the near future.
    To coincide with the current carbon hype a SB-95C and Carbon Race 29er HT would also be further possibilities. Personally I would love to see a full alloy 29er ARC pendant and an updated 26er ARC (tapered headtube, Postmount and replacable dropouts similar to the Big Top).

    A dream come true would be a new steel FRO though, but that will probably never happen...

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    Just put a 180 on the new 303WC. Nice 1x10 gearing. Some XC weight weinie parts and your good.

    No more gap in the lineup.

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    I currently race a ASR-C and recently discovered the benefits of a 29er. I would love for Yeti to make a carbon 29er HT race bike. When I need to new bike, I really dont want to switch brands for a 29er.

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    I totally agree with you. Though I would also appreciate a full alloy version.
    I do not like the alloy/carbon hybrid approach on the BigTop, but like it's versatility.
    My opinion is that they should build a lightweight Race Carbon HT as an opponent to the Santa Cruz Highball, etc. for example and a sturdier, less expensive full alloy All Mountain 100-120mm HT.

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    It doesn't sound like Yeti is that into XC. They have the SB-95 and the ASR5C, which are both great XC/trail bikes. At the end of the day they have a focus on things pointed south.

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    I don't buy the idea that throwing a single crown fork is going to make a the 303 WC (a DH race bike) somehow your trail riding/FR bike. In the first place it doesn't do much to change the a2c so your geo is way slack for trail riding. It's kinda like making the sb66 a big hit FR bike... sure you can push it that way but it would be better to just start a frame built for a 180mm fork.

    We'll see what announcements are made by Yeti at Sea Otter and through the summer. A lot of good stuff has come out this past year and hopefully they don't slow down. I'll be the first in line for the SB 67C!

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    Quote Originally Posted by SaddleRags View Post
    I don't buy the idea that throwing a single crown fork is going to make a the 303 WC (a DH race bike) somehow your trail riding/FR bike. In the first place it doesn't do much to change the a2c so your geo is way slack for trail riding. It's kinda like making the sb66 a big hit FR bike... sure you can push it that way but it would be better to just start a frame built for a 180mm fork.

    We'll see what announcements are made by Yeti at Sea Otter and through the summer. A lot of good stuff has come out this past year and hopefully they don't slow down. I'll be the first in line for the SB 67C!
    .....or even a SB68

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    Quote Originally Posted by SaddleRags View Post
    I don't buy the idea that throwing a single crown fork is going to make a the 303 WC (a DH race bike) somehow your trail riding/FR bike. In the first place it doesn't do much to change the a2c so your geo is way slack for trail riding. It's kinda like making the sb66 a big hit FR bike... sure you can push it that way but it would be better to just start a frame built for a 180mm fork.

    We'll see what announcements are made by Yeti at Sea Otter and through the summer. A lot of good stuff has come out this past year and hopefully they don't slow down. I'll be the first in line for the SB 67C!

    I agree, the wheelbase would be way too long on the WC303 for a play bike. Not to mention the Geo being wacked out...

    +1 on the Sb-68 for their line up.
    I'd hit it, but I bruise like a peach.

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    I own an sb 66........super sick!!!! one thing I don't know, where does the "SB" and the 66 come from? or the 303 where what do these names represent or come from?

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    SB either stands for Super Bike or Switch Bike, depending on who you talk to. The 66 is last digit of wheel size and travel in inches. Hence the SB-66 is a 26-er with 6 inches of travel, and the SB-95 is a 29-er with 5 inches of travel.

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    303 is the area code for Denver/Golden, CO
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  14. #14
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    carbon arc?

  15. #15
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    With the 650B/27.5 picking up momentum like crazy, judging from all the 650B specific stuff coming out at Sea Otter... maybe we'll see an SB76 ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Bacon Jr View Post
    SB either stands for Super Bike or Switch Bike, depending on who you talk to. The 66 is last digit of wheel size and travel in inches. Hence the SB-66 is a 26-er with 6 inches of travel, and the SB-95 is a 29-er with 5 inches of travel.
    i bet you internally, it's "Switch B!tch" knowing Yeti and their sense of humor...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Super66 View Post
    After about a month on the Super66 I'm really loving it as an all mountain bike, but am finding its limitations in sort of the free ride stuff. I'm not sure the 66 would do well with single crown 180 forks and sitting a bit deeper in its travel. As awesome as this bike is, I'm now wondering how a frame a bit beefier would be, something like the SX Trail, a little less trail oriented.
    I think Yeti made this bike already; they called it the ASR-7.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CombatMutt View Post
    I think Yeti made this bike already; they called it the ASR-7.
    The ASR7 was nothing like a AM/FR bike. It was a blown up XC frame.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Super66 View Post
    The ASR7 was nothing like a AM/FR bike. It was a blown up XC frame.
    Closer to freeride than what some others have been saying.

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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Super66 View Post
    The ASR7 was nothing like a AM/FR bike. It was a blown up XC frame.
    The ASR-7 has more in common with a AM/FR bike than an XC - 12mm rear axle, ICSG tabs, 20mm front axle and best of all 7 inches of travel. I would believe that it is more of an AM bike if anything, an Allmountain Swiss Army Knife at that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CombatMutt View Post
    Because a great rider hit a few jumps?

    Look at the geometry, or better yet ride one. I'd be willing to bet the video would't change much if the bike had no suspension.

    7 inches of travel does;t make it a feeeride frame, nor does a 67 degree head tube or the long reach XC geometry.

    Maybe John C will weigh in.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Super66 View Post
    Because a great rider hit a few jumps?

    Look at the geometry, or better yet ride one. I'd be willing to bet the video would't change much if the bike had no suspension.

    7 inches of travel does;t make it a feeeride frame, nor does a 67 degree head tube or the long reach XC geometry.

    Maybe John C will weigh in.
    I am the kid in the video and I agree with both of you. The 7 was not a freeride bike, atleast not with my 32 lbs 160mm build kit. But it was also not a xc bike either. The reason I love my 7 so much is that it sits somewhere in between.


    Currently there are some burly dh courses that I won't ride all out balls to the wall like I would on my DH bike especially with my current build kit, but with a different build (Totem, 1x10, and burly wheelset)

    Then again I also have been on the podium at the Downieville classic on this bike. Which with over 3k of climbing.. That's not really possible on a "freeride" bike.

    I love my 7 because with my 32lb build I have won xc races and super d races, and then turned around the next weekend and been in the top 5 in the pro class at downhill races all on the same build kit.. Not many bikes can say that..

    I love my 7 so much that I am keeping the frame around when I get my carbon sb66.

    The reason that I am going to a 66 is that I am going to get more serious about my Super D racing and I know that the 66 will pedal much better then the 7, not that the 7 was that bad..

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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by CombatMutt View Post
    The Seven is not a freeride bike. It's a trail bike. Can you rail it? For sure, look at what the guy in the video does on it, awesome, but you can rail a 66 as well ....with much less effort. Youre certainly mistaking mm of travel as the indicator. Look at the seat tube and head tube angles. Maybe your confusing it with the ASR-X, or whatever it was called, which was a freeride bike.

    Plus, I don't think Yeti makes the Seven anymore so the OP is correct.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by swan3609 View Post
    I am the kid in the video and I agree with both of you. The 7 was not a freeride bike, atleast not with my 32 lbs 160mm build kit. But it was also not a xc bike either. The reason I love my 7 so much is that it sits somewhere in between.


    Currently there are some burly dh courses that I won't ride all out balls to the wall like I would on my DH bike especially with my current build kit, but with a different build (Totem, 1x10, and burly wheelset)

    Then again I also have been on the podium at the Downieville classic on this bike. Which with over 3k of climbing.. That's not really possible on a "freeride" bike.

    I love my 7 because with my 32lb build I have won xc races and super d races, and then turned around the next weekend and been in the top 5 in the pro class at downhill races all on the same build kit.. Not many bikes can say that..

    I love my 7 so much that I am keeping the frame around when I get my carbon sb66.

    The reason that I am going to a 66 is that I am going to get more serious about my Super D racing and I know that the 66 will pedal much better then the 7, not that the 7 was that bad..

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    Thanks for weighing in!
    I guess I classify anything that can be backflipped as FreeRide. I know my RDH couldn't backflip, I'm guessing a 95 couldn't either. Think you'd throw one on the 66?

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    Quote Originally Posted by CombatMutt View Post
    Thanks for weighing in!
    I guess I classify anything that can be backflipped as FreeRide. I know my RDH couldn't backflip, I'm guessing a 95 couldn't either. Think you'd throw one on the 66?
    I know I could if I really wanted to. But I don't think I ever will flip a carbon 66. The frame is almost as much as I paid for my entire 7 build! And I am done flipping. It was one of those things that I just wanted to do once and get on film and I am done doing them. Check it off the bucket list kinda thing.

    And you would be surprised how easy bikes can be flipped with the right jump. I have seen full 8 inch dh bikes flipped and I know someone has flipped a 29er out there somewhere.

    But yes I agree with both of you. The 7 is not a freeride bike with most builds and its definitely not a xc bike. It can be both.

    I have a problem with the people that doubt its downhill ability. Even with my Rp23, the bike rails downhills and will eat up the stuff I ride at speed. I am sure that if I ever was able to put a vivid air or cane Creek DBAir on it, it would get much better. The other thing people need to take into account is that the geo is unsagged. I run 25-30% sag and I never have issues with the steep degree head tube because once you riding the bike, your not riding a ~67 degree head tube.

    I love my 7 and I will probably always keep the frame just because I love it so much. It was my first real high end that I was able to buy 100% on my own and I have lots of awesome memories on that bike.

    That said I also can't wait for my carbon sb66 too! . The 66 is getting my xt parts off the 7 and the 7 frame will hang out for a while. I am hoping that in the next year or so I will be able to build the 7 back up as a freeride bike with a 180 fork, a hammerschmit, a better shock and burly wheelset.



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    Well I am impressed because it looks like you wake up and start your day with a backflip!

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by swan3609 View Post
    ...the 7 frame will hang out for a while. I am hoping that in the next year or so I will be able to build the 7 back up as a freeride bike with a 180 fork...
    That's exactly what I am going to do with my 7, except I'll be aiming for a mini-DH setup. I picked up a 2011 Marz 66 and still have the stock Crossline wheelset (2200 g of beef). All the AM parts will probably go to a SB-95. It's just a shame that my PUSH'd Monarch Plus RC3 will go used, since I also have a DHX coil for it. Anybody interested in a great deal on one set up for a 7 and a 200 lb (with gear) rider, let me know.

    As far as a hole in the lineup, after riding the SB-66 a couple of times (once with a 150 32 and once with a 36 Float) and just recently demo-ing a SB-95 with a 120 mm fork (will do so again for both bikes this weekend at the Fruita Fat Tire Fest just to be sure), I think a lot of ground is covered. There are so many options that someone could use for the builds of these bikes so that they can range from trail to AM. Even with only 150 mm of rear travel on the 66, it is so good that you will never miss the ~1" of travel that the 7 brings to the table. One would also not miss the pedaling on the 7 either, after riding a 66. Maybe Switch applied to a long travel bike would help this, but good all-rounders are what is required in CO. That is how Yeti will continue to approach their designs. I can appreciate this.
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    The 7 is off Yeti's website, so I'm assuming they are discontinuing that model.

    My SB-66 is set up pretty much all freeride and I reach it's limits if I'm not careful. Still climbs great btw.

    I don't know how large the market is for Freeride frames. Frames like the Scott Voltage or Specialized SX Trail and if it makes sense for a smaller company like Yeti to develop one, but every time I'm on my '66 I think how awesome it would be at 7-8 inches of travel and maybe another degree of rake.

  30. #30
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    Even with only 150 mm of rear travel on the 66, it is so good that you will never miss the ~1" of travel that the 7 brings to the table.
    I think of the new "possibly revamped 7" not so much a trail bike with another inch in back, but as a park bike that is light enough and efficient enough to still rip on the occasional trail. No doubt that the sb66 is a very capable AM bike and can be pushed pretty far in rough stuff but I think park bikes are a completely different animal. Give her a 180mm fork, knock an inch off the seat tube, shorten it up so it jumps better, set the HA at 65* and the attitude changes quite a bit. That's the ticket for the casual FR/DHer (me) who doesn't race or live at the bike parks in the summer.

    I don't know how large the market is for Freeride frames. Frames like the Scott Voltage or Specialized SX Trail and if it makes sense for a smaller company like Yeti to develop one, but every time I'm on my '66 I think how awesome it would be at 7-8 inches of travel and maybe another degree of rake.
    Probably a lot of truth in this. Some companies just can't justify going this direction when there is so much push for niners and the like. However, there are a few companies out there that have 2 bikes that fit in between their 6 inch and DH race bikes though so I guess it just depends on what kind of riding they associate themselves with.

    I know I'm dreaming here but my sb66 frame weighs 7.5 lbs and I bet a carbon sb67 frame could hit or beat that weight. Since I'm still dreaming, throw on a micro-drivetrain with a 28t/ 9-36cassette to get more bb clearance and weight savings since there's no front der, smaller rings/bash. I come up with a 33 pound build so that seems fairly marketable to me, but I admittedly know little about bike markets.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SaddleRags View Post
    I think of the new "possibly revamped 7" not so much a trail bike with another inch in back, but as a park bike that is light enough and efficient enough to still rip on the occasional trail. No doubt that the sb66 is a very capable AM bike and can be pushed pretty far in rough stuff but I think park bikes are a completely different animal. Give her a 180mm fork, knock an inch off the seat tube, shorten it up so it jumps better, set the HA at 65* and the attitude changes quite a bit. That's the ticket for the casual FR/DHer (me) who doesn't race or live at the bike parks in the summer.



    Probably a lot of truth in this. Some companies just can't justify going this direction when there is so much push for niners and the like. However, there are a few companies out there that have 2 bikes that fit in between their 6 inch and DH race bikes though so I guess it just depends on what kind of riding they associate themselves with.

    I know I'm dreaming here but my sb66 frame weighs 7.5 lbs and I bet a carbon sb67 frame could hit or beat that weight. Since I'm still dreaming, throw on a micro-drivetrain with a 28t/ 9-36cassette to get more bb clearance and weight savings since there's no front der, smaller rings/bash. I come up with a 33 pound build so that seems fairly marketable to me, but I admittedly know little about bike markets.
    I like your thinking...

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    I do wish that Yeti would make a SB67 but I think there is little hope of it happening. The sales of the ASR7 were so low they probably feel that market is very impractical. No doubt the ASR7 was a great bike, but it is a one of a kind piece of art, it is the only 7in trail bike. Essentially in my view it is a slightly beefed up 575. And typically beefed up trail bikes don't apply to the freeriding crowd who are more interested in bikes like the Transition TR250, the Intense Slopestyle, and the Knolly Delirium, which would constitute as if anything beefier shorter travel DH bikes. Yeti really need to do their homework if trying to break into the freeride market as bikes like the 7 exemplify, they are not marketed toward "real" freeriders (no offense swan your ride well, props to yeti kid like myself) A bike like the SB67 might be able to do this and would be great but they would have to compete with some larger and more popular brands. For instance if you go up to the vancouver where freeride biking was created and really shows itself on the shuttle trails of the north shore no one rides yeti's at all. Albeit the sb66 is a game changer. I had the opportunity (before I purchased my own) to demo one at mount fromme bc and it handles incredibly well.

    Hell I pin it on my 2010 575, and the Sb66 is even better at imitating a freeride bike. I probably would by an SB67 instead of an SB66 but really the 66 can be pushed very far. I hit some 10-15ft drops on the sb i tested and it did just as well as my freeride bike. With yeti's unlike other large brands like specialized and trek i think it is more about the build than the frame.

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    Quote Originally Posted by focotacoma View Post
    No doubt the ASR7 was a great bike, but it is a one of a kind piece of art, it is the only 7in trail bike. Essentially in my view it is a slightly beefed up 575. And typically beefed up trail bikes don't apply to the freeriding crowd who are more interested in bikes like the Transition TR250, the Intense Slopestyle, and the Knolly Delirium, which would constitute as if anything beefier shorter travel DH bikes. Yeti really need to do their homework if trying to break into the freeride market as bikes like the 7 exemplify, they are not marketed toward "real" freeriders (no offense swan your ride well, props to yeti kid like myself)
    I bought my 7 because it was not a "freeride" bike.. I needed a 7" trail bike.. If you have seen me around, I needed a bike I could race XC on and then turn around and race DH on.. And thats how I rode my 7 . I finished mid pack at a Cat 2 XC race and then turned around and podiumed in the pro class at a DH race the next weekend with the exact same build kit both weekends (Minus a tire swap). And this bike was on the Cat 1 podium of the Downieville XC and Dh last year too..

    I agree with you that it was not a freeride bike but a long travel trail bike.. Even the yeti guys said that they built it after they were beating themselves up on their 575's.. The 7 is nothing more then a beefy 575 that can be used as a light freeride bike, but still rides like a trail bike.. I knew I was not getting a big hit monster but a Long travel trail bike that would take more of a beating then the 575 or Stumpy's that I was looking at previously..




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    Quote Originally Posted by swan3609 View Post
    I bought my 7 because it was not a "freeride" bike.. I needed a 7" trail bike.. If you have seen me around, I needed a bike I could race XC on and then turn around and race DH on.. And thats how I rode my 7 . I finished mid pack at a Cat 2 XC race and then turned around and podiumed in the pro class at a DH race the next weekend with the exact same build kit both weekends (Minus a tire swap). And this bike was on the Cat 1 podium of the Downieville XC and Dh last year too..

    I agree with you that it was not a freeride bike but a long travel trail bike.. Even the yeti guys said that they built it after they were beating themselves up on their 575's.. The 7 is nothing more then a beefy 575 that can be used as a light freeride bike, but still rides like a trail bike.. I knew I was not getting a big hit monster but a Long travel trail bike that would take more of a beating then the 575 or Stumpy's that I was looking at previously..



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    So if anything basically what I think Yeti has done with the SB66 is replaced the ASR7. If they decide to enter the freeride market they may decide to introduce an even beefier switch pivot design like the 66 that could be constituted as a real big hit bike.

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    Quote Originally Posted by focotacoma View Post
    So if anything basically what I think Yeti has done with the SB66 is replaced the ASR7. If they decide to enter the freeride market they may decide to introduce an even beefier switch pivot design like the 66 that could be constituted as a real big hit bike.
    I would say that is almost exactly what they did.. The only thing is that lots of people will say they will miss the big hit ability of the 7.. myself included.. It may be all mental, but for some reason the 7" in the back paired to a good rear shock and a 180 fork still seams like it would be more DH-able then the 66..

    I think that the 7 was a little different than the 66 in the fact that the 7 was build to handle either a 160 or a 180 fork.. I think that the 7 still is different in the builds that you could ride it with.. I have a friend that built a 7 up with light weight XC parts and a 160mm fork and it sits at 27lbs, but this frame would also take well to a 180mm fork and a DH build upwards of 35lbs and serve as a park bike.. I think that the beauty of the 7 was how versatile the frame was. I am not doubting the big hit ability of the 66, but it just was not designed to run a 180mm fork. I know it could be done( I will probably do it with mine at some point) but It was not what Yeti designed that bike for.

    That said, if they came out with a SB67 that could be built up around 34lbs and could really be beat on, I would jump all over that in a heartbeat. But I dont see them doing that.. The "freeride" market is not what it used to be.. The new All-mountain bikes are so capable that for a smaller company like Yeti to try and make a bike to compete with the big dogs on such a small market doesnt make sense.. The gap between a Trail or All-mountain bike and a DH bike is getting so small that a "freerde" bike doesnt make sense

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    would anyone else like to see a carbon 575?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Super66 View Post
    It doesn't sound like Yeti is that into XC. They have the SB-95 and the ASR5C, which are both great XC/trail bikes. At the end of the day they have a focus on things pointed south.
    OP talking about diff styles, and Yeti overall focus is on going south, but XC is still represented. E.g. the 2012 AS-R C is a pretty mean XC race machine. Also agree idea of a 9er AS-R C or ASR is interesting.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Super66 View Post
    The 7 is off Yeti's website, so I'm assuming they are discontinuing that model.

    My SB-66 is set up pretty much all freeride and I reach it's limits if I'm not careful. Still climbs great btw.

    I don't know how large the market is for Freeride frames. Frames like the Scott Voltage or Specialized SX Trail and if it makes sense for a smaller company like Yeti to develop one, but every time I'm on my '66 I think how awesome it would be at 7-8 inches of travel and maybe another degree of rake.
    You hit the nail on the head: the market for FR frames is pretty small. We are seeing a trend of less is more, do anything AM bikes. Many companies have dropped their 7 and 8" FR frames, while introducing slacker, more capable trail/AM frames with build options ranging from light xc, to FR. 90% will find 6" bikes built for FR plenty for whatever they want to do, the remaining 10% will have fewer options.

    Going big FR bikes are taking a back seat to all around bikes that excel at flow, jump style trails, over big hit tall BB bikes that excel at hucking and riding chunk. I'm attracted to the 66, but I feel the BB is too low, and the fork options too limiting for it to be a FR bike. IMO, 6" bikes that can handle a 180 fork fill the 7 and even 8" FR slot pretty well. The 66 just doesn't cover that end of the market.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LCW View Post
    With the 650B/27.5 picking up momentum like crazy, judging from all the 650B specific stuff coming out at Sea Otter... maybe we'll see an SB76 ?
    They should do a run of rear triangles so us 575 riders can stuff the larger wheel in the back, and then see how much interest their is. My visa is already out.

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