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  1. #1
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    ASRsl/575 v's Trance

    Okay, cards on the table, I plan to just ride pretty tame XC but with some rough sections so at least 3.5 inches plus of travel is needed (I currently pilot an ARC which I love but my old bones aint up to it any more and I'm finding I'm having accidents due to being fatigued out on the trials after a few hours.)

    I test rode an ASRsl and loved it, a 575 and disliked it (could be bad setup, will investigate further this coming tuesday) but at the end of the day, it's a vast shirtload to be shelling on a frame. Please don't get me wrong, I' love the ARC and the ASRsl climbs damn near as well. if someone was to dump 3k Australian into my hand I'd be there in a flash. I don't want to desert the tribe but if the Trance is anywhwere near as good as people are saying it is then I simply can't justify 3 times as much dosh.

    So, the big, nasty and non yeti focused question is this:

    Have you test ridden or ridden both an ASRsl and a Trance. What has the ASR got that the trance doesn't (aside from a 1lb advantage).

    I'm seeking something pretty light (as in, not much heavier than the ARC) (and it felt like the ASRsl wasn't) that climbs well without bobbing whne you get out of the saddle and crank to get a hill pinch out of the way (the ASR didn't bob appreciably) and that soaks up the lumps.

    Will the Trance get me 90% of the way there at 33% of the price?



    Drew

  2. #2
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    Yetis vs.Trance - thouughts

    I was riding a Trance before I got my 575.

    Trance is very good make no mistake.

    My Trance frame weighed 7.5 lbs - so a fair bit heavier than my 575 and a lot more than an ASR.

    Advantages of the Trance are: Cost, no brake jack, active even when braking, very stiff

    Dis advantages are : Heavy, short top tube for given size, collects mud around pivots

    You should not be considering the Trance if you like the ASR - look at the Anthem instead.

    If you like the 575 than look at the Reign - it weighs only one pound more than the Trance and has 6in of travel

    In conclusion - if you buy with your head, go for Giant - if you buy with your heart. it has to be a Yeti every time.

    Hope this helps.

    Chaser.

  3. #3
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    get the asr sl not the 575, not the trance, not the reign

    Quote Originally Posted by Fullrange Drew
    Okay, cards on the table, I plan to just ride pretty tame XC but with some rough sections so at least 3.5 inches plus of travel is needed (I currently pilot an ARC which I love but my old bones aint up to it any more and I'm finding I'm having accidents due to being fatigued out on the trials after a few hours.)

    I test rode an ASRsl and loved it, a 575 and disliked it (could be bad setup, will investigate further this coming tuesday) but at the end of the day, it's a vast shirtload to be shelling on a frame. Please don't get me wrong, I' love the ARC and the ASRsl climbs damn near as well. if someone was to dump 3k Australian into my hand I'd be there in a flash. I don't want to desert the tribe but if the Trance is anywhwere near as good as people are saying it is then I simply can't justify 3 times as much dosh.

    So, the big, nasty and non yeti focused question is this:

    Have you test ridden or ridden both an ASRsl and a Trance. What has the ASR got that the trance doesn't (aside from a 1lb advantage).

    I'm seeking something pretty light (as in, not much heavier than the ARC) (and it felt like the ASRsl wasn't) that climbs well without bobbing whne you get out of the saddle and crank to get a hill pinch out of the way (the ASR didn't bob appreciably) and that soaks up the lumps.

    Will the Trance get me 90% of the way there at 33% of the price?



    Drew
    I think you will be happy with the ASR-SL
    Sit and spin my ass...

  4. #4
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    Sadly, although my heart would truly love an ASRsl, my bank balance simply won't stretch that far. Maybe in a year or so once my work is more secure I'll be able to stretch things that far, but for the present, it's simply not possible.

    I took a long time friend along with me when I did the first test ride of the ASRsl. He doesn't get swayed by marketing hype and basically tells it like it is. After riding the ASRsl he said:

    "I'd always figured that the whole Yeti thing was just people lalking up the bike they had because it had cost them heaps but it's not. Everything they say about them is true. This thing is awesome!"

    I'm in full agreement. I've never ridden another hardtail that felt as sweet as my ARC and for the riding I do, the ASRsl is my dream rig. Unfortuneately, for this 12 months, I'm afraid it'll have to stay as a dream rig,

    I'd rather be out riding a trance and having fun while I save for the ASRsl than be dreading long laps of the Australian Canberra 24 hour course on the ARC.

    (all this on the proviso that I don't hate the Trance when I test ride it)

    I'm pretty convinced on staying with Yeti for life but I may have to put up with a 12 month lapse. (of course the ARC will still be in the stable)

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fullrange Drew
    Sadly, although my heart would truly love an ASRsl, my bank balance simply won't stretch that far. Maybe in a year or so once my work is more secure I'll be able to stretch things that far, but for the present, it's simply not possible.

    I took a long time friend along with me when I did the first test ride of the ASRsl. He doesn't get swayed by marketing hype and basically tells it like it is. After riding the ASRsl he said:

    "I'd always figured that the whole Yeti thing was just people lalking up the bike they had because it had cost them heaps but it's not. Everything they say about them is true. This thing is awesome!"

    I'm in full agreement. I've never ridden another hardtail that felt as sweet as my ARC and for the riding I do, the ASRsl is my dream rig. Unfortuneately, for this 12 months, I'm afraid it'll have to stay as a dream rig,

    I'd rather be out riding a trance and having fun while I save for the ASRsl than be dreading long laps of the Australian Canberra 24 hour course on the ARC.

    (all this on the proviso that I don't hate the Trance when I test ride it)

    I'm pretty convinced on staying with Yeti for life but I may have to put up with a 12 month lapse. (of course the ARC will still be in the stable)
    I was going to recommend the Stumjumper FRS 120, but you'll get more bike with the trance for half the price.

    If you go with the Trance, get at least the Trance 2 or 1. Make sure you get a seatpost with set back like the FSA or a laidback thomson. The top tube on the trance is stupid short. Everything else feels good on it. My buddy has one and I did 10 miles of single track on it. The shock travel seems shorter than advertised. Or mabe is from going from a 5 spot to a trance that the travel felt so short. If you are over 225lbs. forget it.
    Sit and spin my ass...

  6. #6
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    A different Thought.....

    When in doubt, buy a Turner.....
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Sit and spin my ass...

  7. #7
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    I have not ridden the Trance but the ASR-SL simply is one of the best XC Racers and trail bikes out there- depending on your build. I may never have got one unless I lucked out like I did and saw a brand new (titanium pivot) on Jenson for around $1K. I just grabbed it and built it up and though it's built like a trail bike (as opposed to an XC racer) it is fast, responsive, and takes turns really well. I love the 575 as well but when it comes to steep climbs or fast/sharp curves, the ASR-SL will just pull ahead. The geometry and XC-Racer frame design helps immensely. After riding it for a year, I got the 575. At first, the 575 felt sluggish and laid back but with the proper setup and after getting used to it with 3-4 rides, it is one bada$$ trail bike and feels pretty responsive as well.

  8. #8
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    Actually, I'm looking at just the frame. I'll transfer my bits across from the ARC.

    So build will be:
    Frame: ASRsl or Trance 1 (both with RP3)
    Fork: Fax Vanilla R 100
    Wheelset: FSA XC300 24 spoke
    Tyres: Syncros PnC Factory 2.1 up front and same on rear or Larsen TT 2.0, Michelin Comp S Light, Maxxlite 310 depending on conditions.
    Crankset: Middleburn RS8 running Blackspire Super Pro 22,32,44 or Middleburn Uno 32
    BB: SKF 600 series
    Shifters: SRAMx9
    Front Mech: xGen
    Rear Mech: x0
    Brakes: Hayes Mag Carbon (the ones that were top spec weightweenie Hayes before El Camino was released)
    Bar: Salsa Pro Moto Carbon flat bar
    Seatpost: Moots 27.2 layback (mmmmmm)
    Saddle: SDG Bel Air (cowprint)


    Grips are Ritchey WCS neoprene, pedals Shimano 540 SPD, Cassette will be XT 11-34

    There are some places where I could opt for a lighter build (such as a non vanilla fork) where I've chosen plush over light but it's a build I'd be happy to put on most any XC bike.

    Hope to do the wheelset upgrade later on to something with Stans ZTR Olympic rims (FSA set is lightish but the rims are 460g each so they're heading into hefty slug territory there, ZTR's Revolutions and Hope Pro II's would be pretty good as a cost/weight balance I reckon)

    Anyway, chasing frame only which shaves the costs a fair bit.

    Drew

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