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Thread: Asr-sl weights

  1. #1
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    Asr-sl weights

    Can anyone tell me the weight difference between a 2005 Asr-sl with alluminium chain stay and a 2006 model with Carbon?
    Apart from this and the paint scheme are there any other differences between the bikes?
    Thanks alot.
    I'll add that I'm interested in the medium size.
    Last edited by Renz; 10-16-2006 at 01:37 PM.

  2. #2
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    From rough calcs it's about 5.1lbs for a new ASRsl and 5.3lbs for the alu swingarm version.

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    Thanks. Any other differences between the bikes?

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    Not sure if you're asking about frame/shock alone or about spec as well.

    Still running the same RP3 at the back, haven't seen any changes in the spec to indicate alteration of the angles, wheelbase or any of that.

    Biggest difference is in the (arguably) nummy paintwork that they've changed to. Personally, from the pics I've seen and the bikes I've seen in the flesh, the raw/painted scheme currently on the ASRsl doesn't float my boat much in pink/raw, red/raw or turquoise/raw. It looks pretty cool in black/raw nad I saw a promo shot up here of an 07 model in white/raw which looked very sexy (although it'd get dirty in 2 milliseconds).

    Without knowing more about the carbon swingarm and getting a chance to ride one, it's hard to know if it's just a weight saving measure or if it has resulted in any degree of flex at the back. I'd put my money on it being stiff and lighter and not having made the bike any flexier.

    I'm slumming it on an 01 model ASR with pivots on the back end which overall is around 3/4 of a pound heavier than the current ASRsl frameset, but it's still a hell of a fun bike to ride around.

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    Thanks, just asking 'cos I have to decide on which model to buy. I think I might get an 05 model if there's a big saving, the wife's already complaining about me wanting to change my bike after "only" 3 years! Haven't told her that I'm looking for new ski's too!

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    I'd be suprised if you could still track down an 05 model at all.

    Also, be aware that although they mightn't have tweaked the wheelbase, angles and so forth (the stuff that you can look at in the yeti specs) they may well have made minor shifts to the pivot locations by a mm or two which, although appearing negligable, will go towards further tweaking what was already a very nicely setup frameset. A mm or two to the positioning of the dogbone link for instance would change the rising/falling/progressiveness/rate curve in all sorts of ways, depeding on which way you shifted it.

    If at all possible, ride an 05 and an 06 with the same shock settings to compare feel.

    Final point I guess is that I got to run a test ride around 6 months back on an 05 model and it was an absolute corker of a bike, so either way, you're going to be getting a damn fine steed.

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    Thanks alot for the advice. Here in Italy it's not easy (pretty impossible really) to get Yeti test rides. Unfortunately I'm buying blind but from what I've read it should be the bike I'm looking for, fast enough for racing but sturdy enough to take onto a proper mountain.

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    Coming off a hardtail ARC, I didn't need the extra squish that the 575 offers, and with the longer travel and the higher BB it felt too high in the centre of gravity side of things for me to feel comfortable on it. I can bomb a gravel fireroad as fast as I want on the ASR and feel comfortable. On the 575 I always felt a bit too high up and top heavy so I tended to hold back a bit because I didn't feel as safe and stable.

    The ASRsl is a fabulous bike to ride. If I ever upgrade my ASR, it'll only be to get a current model ASRsl.

  9. #9
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    Great bike!

    Quote Originally Posted by Renz
    Thanks alot for the advice. Here in Italy it's not easy (pretty impossible really) to get Yeti test rides. Unfortunately I'm buying blind but from what I've read it should be the bike I'm looking for, fast enough for racing but sturdy enough to take onto a proper mountain.

    I raced it this year and loved every minute. I'll take it on pretty heinous technical terrain on the weekends and it does just as well as my old "All Mountain" bike. Sure I might not be able to jump off ramps or anything, but it took a few 4" drops at the 24 Hours of Moab this week and survived. It's as fast as my HT, and as stable.

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    Quote Originally Posted by used2Bhard
    I raced it this year and loved every minute. I'll take it on pretty heinous technical terrain on the weekends and it does just as well as my old "All Mountain" bike. Sure I might not be able to jump off ramps or anything, but it took a few 4" drops at the 24 Hours of Moab this week and survived. It's as fast as my HT, and as stable.
    Fantastic, just what I thought, I'm really excited about getting one!. Just hope that it doesn't bob too much, I don't like bikes that bob alot!

  11. #11
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    Single Pivot

    Quote Originally Posted by Renz
    Fantastic, just what I thought, I'm really excited about getting one!. Just hope that it doesn't bob too much, I don't like bikes that bob alot!
    It's still a single pivot, so It's not going to be as good as a horst link suspension for resisting bob. What I do, is run it a little high on air pressure and in the "3" setting on the RP23. It will not bob at all in the saddle, but will give some while I sprint. When I get to a downhill, I flip the switch into the "soft" setting and fly away. For really rough trails I'll leave it in the "2" setting and just accept a little bit of give. The RP3/23 really works well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by used2Bhard
    It's still a single pivot, so It's not going to be as good as a horst link suspension for resisting bob. What I do, is run it a little high on air pressure and in the "3" setting on the RP23. It will not bob at all in the saddle, but will give some while I sprint. When I get to a downhill, I flip the switch into the "soft" setting and fly away. For really rough trails I'll leave it in the "2" setting and just accept a little bit of give. The RP3/23 really works well.
    Obviously I'd expect it to work in rough/downhill situations and that's what attracts me to it plus it being a very light frame. My only concern is pushing hard on flat/smooth surfaces. I'm currently on a Giant NRS and that only bobs when I'm spinning in the higher gears, I like the bike because when I push the lower gears or sprint in the saddle there's little or no perceptual movement, but on the downside when I'm in the real mountains and not racing it,s very "skitty" and my friends leave me for dead! I'm hoping the Yeti can give me the best of both worlds.

  13. #13
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    You'll be fine

    I think it will be just what you are looking for. I can descend way faster on this bike than I ever could on my Scalpel. It has a really stable, yet active feel on the descents. I think it is the best compromise between a plush bike and one that will climb quickly. The fact that it's .5lb less than most other frames sealed the deal for me. Also the fact that 1/2 my compeditors were always riding one as well....If you can't beat 'em join 'em.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by used2Bhard
    it took a few 4" drops at the 24 Hours of Moab this week and survived.
    The ASR can take a 4" drop? Way cool! It's nice to know I can roll it off the curb now and not worry about it cracking up on me. Just kidding - someone must have slipped some smarta$$ flakes in my breakfast cereal this morning. Really though, you're saying there are line choice options for 4 foot drops at the Moab 24hr???

  15. #15
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    Tee Hee!

    Ya, those 4 inch drops can be killer eh..... I love that mistake.... especially when listing dimensions on something.....

    For my night post-flood lap, I was bombing in the fog and flew off a ledge that I didn't see coming. It was a hard landing on some rocks. Previously I went down some steps on the left... I also his a few of the little box channels that eroded in at 20+ mph. Bunnyhopping for all my might the rear wheel stil hit...hard....

    After all that my Stans Olympics were still completely true as well. I'm impressed with this lightweight stuff.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by used2Bhard
    For my night post-flood lap, I was bombing in the fog and flew off a ledge that I didn't see coming. It was a hard landing on some rocks. Previously I went down some steps on the left...
    Ack! I think the biggest drop I've ever done on my XC race rig (before the ASR-SL) was a similar scenario, where I was on a group ride second in line down a fast descent. The leader who was familiar with the trail gapped me a little and went around a blind corner obstructed by some trees. Consequently, I didn't see his line and took an apex to the far inside, not realizing that his line was to the complete outside with a little 1/2 foot lip while my line suddenly had me launched off a much more significant drop of what seemed like about 6 feet (probably more like 4 feet in reality ). Luckily it had a steep transition that saved my butt from the combo dead sailor / nose wheelie landing. The rear wheel decided to come back down as I rolled it out down the landing, instead of pitching me over the bars into what would have been a first class high speed "mining expedition".

    Not such a big drop in the grand scheme, but certainly way more than I was set up to handle at that instant.

  17. #17
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    Good job! Yeti Asr Sl

    Hi
    I am italian and I have a YETI asr sl model 2006 size m ( rear carbon ) .
    I have assenbled it with fork reba world cup , whelles mavic crossmax sl , tyres geax tnt , crankset and disc brake shimano xtr . the total wheght is 11 Kg .
    It is a very good for XC ,
    Attached Images Attached Images

  18. #18
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    Nice bike! Complimenti! Where did you buy it?

  19. #19
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    answer where I have bought yeti bike

    I have bought the frame and the components for the Yeti asr in the DREAMTEAM shop of asti .
    The assembly I have made it .
    If you are intersted the shop have a site that is : www.dreamteamasti.it

    bye

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