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  1. #1
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    Another 575 Question

    So, like I said before, I recently purchased a used 575.

    It rides very well, but as it is used, I'm just making sure every part of it is in top shape....so I've been pouring over all of the little details as much as possible.

    Earelier today, I noticed that the rear wheel has slightly less clearance on the non-drive side than on the drive side of the seatstay. Which, I guess, makes sense, as the cassette takes up more space than the brake rotor., and the seatstays are straight.

    But, it just doesn't look right. As far as I can tell (without tools, only eyes) the dropout is not bent, nor is anypart of the swingarm (it looks hardly-ridden)

    Thanks
    Oh, and yes, of course, I checked a million times to make sure the rear wheel is on correctly.

    Also, alot of the sound went away on my early AM ride this morning (from previous post). And the seller told me he recenly re-built it, so maybe it just had to warm up a bit.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by lacticacidbath
    So, like I said before, I recently purchased a used 575.

    It rides very well, but as it is used, I'm just making sure every part of it is in top shape....so I've been pouring over all of the little details as much as possible.

    Earelier today, I noticed that the rear wheel has slightly less clearance on the non-drive side than on the drive side of the seatstay. Which, I guess, makes sense, as the cassette takes up more space than the brake rotor., and the seatstays are straight.

    But, it just doesn't look right. As far as I can tell (without tools, only eyes) the dropout is not bent, nor is anypart of the swingarm (it looks hardly-ridden)

    Thanks
    Oh, and yes, of course, I checked a million times to make sure the rear wheel is on correctly.

    Also, alot of the sound went away on my early AM ride this morning (from previous post). And the seller told me he recenly re-built it, so maybe it just had to warm up a bit.
    I'm on an analytical roll today so I'll take a stab.

    Assuming that the swingarm was somehow bent, that would throw everything else out of whack right? It wouldn't shift right, stuff wouldn't fit right, etc... It would cause other issues that would be noticeable since there are other dependant things attached.

    Given that, I would say it is as designed.... I'll put mine together tonight and can be sure then... but if I had to bet, I would say it's fine.

  3. #3
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    seat tube

    checking the clearance from chainstay (or seatstay) to tire is not really the best way, specially if it's the stays are not symmetrical (and as you can see by the chainstays on the 575, they're asymmetrical). To eyeball the rear wheel dish, stand directly behind your bike and look at the center of the rear tire in relation to the seat tube. It should be directly inline with each other. If the tire is a little bit to the right or left, check the dish of the wheel. If the wheel dish is perfect, check the dropout alignment. I'm betting the dish is a bit off...

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by lacticacidbath

    Earelier today, I noticed that the rear wheel has slightly less clearance on the non-drive side than on the drive side of the seatstay. Which, I guess, makes sense, as the cassette takes up more space than the brake rotor., and the seatstays are straight.
    as usual i've got the same with my ASX Tire seems to be bit closer to the left side of the swingarm. I'm hoping that the swingarm is asymmetric, but i guess it's not in case of ASX, is it ? Mabe you can post a picture ? I can :
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  5. #5
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    from...

    looking at the Yeti website, the ASX stays are symmetrical. From the pics, it looks like a bad dish (assuming that everything is torqued down properly). Take the wheel off, remove the QR, and go to a bike shop and have them check the dish of the wheel and I bet it's off by less than 5mm. Machine built wheels are notorious for loosening up over time and miles (specially if linseed oil or spoke prep was not used during the build). The shop should be able to dish it true it for you for a small charge.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by flipnidaho
    looking at the Yeti website, the ASX stays are symmetrical. From the pics, it looks like a bad dish (assuming that everything is torqued down properly). Take the wheel off, remove the QR, and go to a bike shop and have them check the dish of the wheel and I bet it's off by less than 5mm. Machine built wheels are notorious for loosening up over time and miles (specially if linseed oil or spoke prep was not used during the build). The shop should be able to dish it true it for you for a small charge.
    I was afraid that stays should be symmetrical... bummer... sorry for my English but what does 'bad dish' mean? That spokes on the casette side shold be tightened and those on the other side loosen do that the rim is moved to the right ? If so than I guess it's not it as my wheels were laced by my friend who's been bike-mechanic for 10 years so I guess the wheel is ok...
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  7. #7
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    Yes

    Quote Originally Posted by goRz
    what does 'bad dish' mean? That spokes on the casette side shold be tightened and those on the other side loosen do that the rim is moved to the right ? ..
    In a nutshell yes, that is dish... if you look at your pictures and the tire relative to the seat tube, it looks to be just a little bit to the left so you'd want to pull the rim to your right (towards the cassette). to do this properly however, you'll need a dish gauge (it ensures that the rim is centered on the hub). I don't doubt your friend's wheelbuilding ability but most wheels loosen over time which is why most wheelbuilders will ask you to return the wheel for a check up after it has "settled" down by riding it for a few days/weeks.

  8. #8
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    My 575 has a slightly bigger gap on one side than the other too [not as much as on the asx pics] although the wheel tracks dead centre to the seat tube - you only need to worry if the wheel looks out of line with the frame or you are running a massive tire that will use every mm of clearence.
    Go ride.
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