Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: 575 raceability

  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    37

    New question here. 575 raceability

    I was thinking about getting a yeti asr 575 and was wondering if anybody uses it for xc races and how well it works. Any help would be appreciated .

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Tejas Mtb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    73
    my LBS has two or three guys who race the thing and they claim it works well. might hurt you a lil in the hills but def going to have the advantage when things get rough and the gravity/DH sections arrive.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    52

    OK for fun....

    I've raced mine in Beginner (sandbagger) class a few times this year. The main goal was to see if I liked racing and to avoid a "DFL". I notice a disadvantage on real twisty-tight stuff and with technical, steep, short burst climbs. I think this is due to the slack head-tube angle, long legs, and slower acceleration.

    On races that are longer in length and have more steady climbs with a technical downhill, the bike performs as well as most from what I have noticed.

    Like many others have reported on this site, you can go race and have fun. If you are in it to win, it probably isn't the right tool for the job. Even in beginner class (where guys I race against have competed every year for 20+ years), the best riders seem to have the top skills, fitness and equipment.

    If I race next year, I'll pop for the ASR. For now, my 575 is happy to be back in it's natural habitat and yes, we avoided the dreaded "DFL".

  4. #4
    In my mind, I can do it!
    Reputation: iviguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    2,375
    Quote Originally Posted by b_chance5
    I've raced mine in Beginner (sandbagger) class a few times this year. The main goal was to see if I liked racing and to avoid a "DFL". I notice a disadvantage on real twisty-tight stuff and with technical, steep, short burst climbs. I think this is due to the slack head-tube angle, long legs, and slower acceleration.

    On races that are longer in length and have more steady climbs with a technical downhill, the bike performs as well as most from what I have noticed.

    Like many others have reported on this site, you can go race and have fun. If you are in it to win, it probably isn't the right tool for the job. Even in beginner class (where guys I race against have competed every year for 20+ years), the best riders seem to have the top skills, fitness and equipment.

    If I race next year, I'll pop for the ASR. For now, my 575 is happy to be back in it's natural habitat and yes, we avoided the dreaded "DFL".
    Ok, I'll ask... DFL?

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    52

    DFL Explained

    Not my term, but it stands for Dead F*ing Last.

  6. #6
    Bad Case of the Mondays
    Reputation: Jdub's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,920
    Quote Originally Posted by iviguy
    Ok, I'll ask... DFL?
    I'll paraphrase a bit, but you get the idea:

    DFL = Dead Freaking Last

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    8,416
    You will lose time in the tight twisty stuff and in the straights to the short-travel FS XC Racers and HTs. If that is not a huge deal, yes, it would prob be a hoot to race it in rocky trails and it sure is light enough.

  8. #8
    Who is John Galt?
    Reputation: Big Jim Mac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    1,707
    I find the 575 to be very fast in the tight twisty stuff, of course I don't have a cross country racer to compare to. one of the trails I ride winds through a stand of cedars with barely enough room for the bars to pass and I can fly through this. But I guess a bike designed for this would have the advantage.
    What, me hurry?

  9. #9
    Bad Case of the Mondays
    Reputation: Jdub's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,920
    Also depends a lot on setup. With a XCish wheelset, a travel adjustable fork and higher pressures in the shock it could be a capable racer. Now it will never be as fast as a hardtail on smooth, twisty stuff but capable for the weekend warrior type of racer I'm sure.

    In longer, endurance type races I'd think it would be better suited. In those races a lot of people prefer to have some travel to avoid getting beaten up so much over the longer durations.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    8,416
    It is not a slow trailbike at all but with equal or similar skills and familiarily with the 575 and an XC racer like the El Fuego, AS-R SL, or Racer X, you will be quicker and more nimble through tight or even not-so-tight corners and straights. I say this because I was faster on my ASR and I'm faster even on my X-5 with it's sharper head tube angle and extra stiffness. The difference is significant enough to be obvious. The 575's geometry makes it a solid trailbike but that also takes away from its racing abilities.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    8,416
    Of course, a decent racer on a 38 lb freeride bike could probably outride me on a 25 lb XC Racer on a given course so a lot depends on your skills.

  12. #12
    Toilet scrubber
    Reputation: tahoe_County's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    14

    2 races on mine

    I got burned up (DFL) on a 9 mile race "B"/sport class and almost won a "C"/beginner race. Just a local club race so nothing special. The only noticable problem was using too much of the 5.75" in the 3 miles of smoothed out whoopties. I couldn't stay in the saddle w/o mean impacts on the equipment. More air in the RP3 would've helped. Until i get a big raise ill be racing the yeti. My yeti is 90% for riding and 10% racing.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    25
    I just got into racing this summer and I'm doing so on my new 575. In four races (beginner class) I've taken 3rd three times and 2nd once. I think it's just fine for beginner racing. I rode a lightweight Spec FSR XC Pro for five years before this bike. The 575 is a tad slower on the climbs, but I don't think it's that significant. I can bomb the downhills twice as fast as I could on my old bike. Plus, on the 15-20 mile races it's nice to see those hardtail weenies suffer while I'm riding my ultra comfy 575.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    351
    Over the last few years the Yeti mens team of 4 have shown up at the Mont Australian 24 Hour Race at Kowen Forest in Canberra, Australia.

    The first year they were there they had both ASRsl's and 575's with them. The first guy headed out on his ASRsl, decided that it wasn't the bike for that course and the team switched to the 575's. I believe the hot laps for both daytime and nightime for this race for 03, 04 and 05 were set on 575's.

    Not only can you race on a 575, you can race and win. Depends on the rider and the track.

    I guess it comes down to personal preference. I test rode a 575 and really didn't like it, jsut not suited to how I ride and what i feel comfortable on, but golly gee, there's a heck of a lot of folks out there that absolutely bloody love them.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •