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  1. #1
    bikerbert
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    Are you lifting weights in season?

    Whose in the gym a few times a week when they aren't riding?

  2. #2
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    Once a week - strength maintenance - a couple of basic multi- joint lifts (pull ups, rows, push up circuits, shoulder circuits etc.) core - work up to 80-85% max

    I do some of these push up variations, judos, 1 leg up, pikes, etc.
    TFW "New" 4 Minute Pushup Challenge - YouTube!

    Shoulder variations like this - no, not that much weight - keep shoulders healthy for crashes
    DeFrancosGym.com - Exercise Index: 3-Way "Shoulder Shocker" - YouTube

    Did trap bar deadlifts on 1" blocks for legs last year in season, not this season

    See "strength maintenance" phase below
    http://www.trainingbible.com/pdf/Cyc...th_Program.pdf

  3. #3
    bikerbert
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    Are you lifting weights in season?

    LOVE the trap bar! Great tool to stay strong.

  4. #4
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Once a week, mostly because my wife goes. I'll probably try to make it twice next winter, and do some heavier weights. Skipping it this weekend to go race.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  5. #5
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    Are you lifting weights in season?

    You'll often hear it said that there's no point doing any weights during the season, as riding your bike more is what makes you faster. That argument is fair enough if you're fully healthy to begin with.

    The problem with cycling exclusively is that it isn't a whole body exercise. It only works a fairly limited set of muscle groups, leading to muscle imbalances and not a great deal of upper body exercise.

    Once you start picking up a few injuries however (eg: a seperated shoulder, knee damage etc) regular exercises and some weight work can be very useful to keep doing year round. If you concentrate purely on cycling and let the muscle tone of areas that you've injured previously drop it can have a negative effect (crunchy joints, excessive soreness, increased likelihood of re-injury), whereas if you can keep up the work you began with physiotherapy long term the old injuries are less likely to be troubling in future.

    I'll tend to try and do some weights work at least twice a week (once a week isn't enough). Because the focus is cycling I aim for maintaining functional strength in the muscles, ligaments and tendons, rather than muscle bulk. Enough strength and good muscle tone to comfortably handle the requirements of cycling (eg: avoid arm pump on bumpy offroad descents) and keep my joints smooth. As an example I'll do something like wrist curls but only with a 10kg dumbbell in each hand, which is quite light.

    That style of weight training isn't as draining as lifting heavy weights so you can easily do double days training, which works better than having a dedicated weights day. At the moment I'll go for a walk on crutches in the morning and then do weight training at home (using free weights) in the evening. Once I'm finally able to ride a bike again the walking will be replaced by riding.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by WR304 View Post
    I'll tend to try and do some weights work at least twice a week (once a week isn't enough). Because the focus is cycling I aim for maintaining functional strength in the muscles, ligaments and tendons, rather than muscle bulk. Enough strength and good muscle tone to comfortably handle the requirements of cycling (eg: avoid arm pump on bumpy offroad descents) and keep my joints smooth. As an example I'll do something like wrist curls but only with a 10kg dumbbell in each hand, which is quite light.

    That style of weight training isn't as draining as lifting heavy weights
    I am curious - "once a week isn't enough"? With research and experience I have found, once a week lifting is good enough to make 'strength gains' let alone maintain. My experiences range from football to collegiate sprinter (running) to cycling.

    I am not being confrontational - just curious what you base this on.

    What is this "style of weight training" you are referring to? rep range? percent of max you are lifting to?

    peace

  7. #7
    g3h6o3
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    I do Crossfit once a week unless I have other obligations (2X in the off-season). If I have the choice between Crossfit and riding, I'll ride. These days I don't get many chances to ride off-road so riding wins most of the time although I do miss Crossfit and plan to go this week even if the forecast is sunny.
    Check out my SportTracks plugins for some training aid software.

  8. #8
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    I would love to do weight training, especially since it was something I was big into through college and years after. I just started racing about a year ago and this year moved up to Cat 2 where I know I'm going to get blown away by the top guys. I also just signed up for the VT 50 which will easily be the most difficult thing I've ever attempted to do.

    I just don't know how I could fit in any weight training with my need to continue to increase the amount of time I spend on the bike. Right now I'm only averaging about 5hrs per week. A little more than that when possible but not much more. Just looking at the VT 50 at the end of sept, I've never been on my bike for as long as the race is going to take me to complete. It just seems like any hour I would potentially spend weight training is an hour I should be improving my endurance on the bike. My goal is is to work in weight training this winter but I just don't see how I could possibly replace seat time right now.
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by qdawgg View Post
    It just seems like any hour I would potentially spend weight training is an hour I should be improving my endurance on the bike.
    +1 for me. I understand the importance and try to fit it in where I can, but most weeks it doesn't happen for this very reason.

  10. #10
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    Once a week if possible. I lift at night, that way I'm not replacing potential ride time.

    Here's some evidence of its benefit:
    In-season strength maintenance training i... [Eur J Appl Physiol. 2010] - PubMed - NCBI
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  11. #11
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    Are you lifting weights in season?

    Quote Originally Posted by scottz123 View Post
    I am curious - "once a week isn't enough"? With research and experience I have found, once a week lifting is good enough to make 'strength gains' let alone maintain. My experiences range from football to collegiate sprinter (running) to cycling.

    I am not being confrontational - just curious what you base this on.

    What is this "style of weight training" you are referring to? rep range? percent of max you are lifting to?

    peace
    That's a good question, and one which is well worth asking. That's what forums are for.

    I should really have said something like "I find that weight training once a week isn't enough for keeping my joints working smoothly."

    My background is in road racing but I've had many injuries and health problems over the last 15 years, leading to a lot of time in hospital. Those two things have been major influences on how I view weight training, and what I use it for. A distorted view of what a good body image is (watts/kg for climbing ) and an emphasis on rehabilitation. Being able to benchpress or squat a particular maximum weight doesn't come into it and the minimum of muscle bulk is preferable. This picture of Michael Rasmussen is a good example.


    Michael Rasmussen

    My aims for weight training:

    - The priority is riding 6 or 7 days per week. 15 to 20 hours per week on the bike. Weight training time is additional to cycling. It doesn't replace any cycling time.
    - Weights mustn't negatively affect recovery for cycling next day.
    - Maintain a minimum strength level for upper body and keep joints from aching or crunching excessively.
    - Easy to do, using minimal equipment at home, no travelling or setup time.
    - Don't get injured from lifting heavy weights.

    The weight training that I do tries to reflect those aims. It's more of an evolution of physiotherapy exercises than bodybuilding really. I try to use exercises that don't aggravate old injuries (some exercises such as push ups are too uncomfortable to do), light weights (I limit it to 10kg dumbbells for most upper body exercises), middling reps (usually 3 sets of 10 repetitions), a slow action and not working to failure. By not working to failure it isn't that tiring and doesn't affect riding the next day.

    Because each weights session (45 to 50 minutes length) isn't that hard in itself (no soreness afterwards) it's easy to do as part of a double day training (cycling in the morning and weights in the evening), meaning there's no need to dedicate a day just to weight training and no problem with riding the next day either.

    By doing fairly easy sessions twice per week it spreads the work load out even more, allowing you to vary different body part exercises contained in each session. If you were only doing one maintenance session per week then it means either doing a much longer session, (in order to fit all the different exercises in), a two week gap between doing exercises if you're varying sessions or limiting the exercises you do.

  12. #12
    Daniel the Dog
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    Lift weights because you don't want bigger legs and a skinny upper body. Not a good look

  13. #13
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    I find that the majority of my riding is road or doubletrack, so the upper body doesn't get that much of a workout. Then when you come to ride some technical trails hard or race them, it's pretty hard on arms, back, shoulders etc.

    For that reason I try to do push ups, pull ups, planks etc. when I can (usually once or twice a week, just at home). Recently I've switched to jumping from one exercise straight to another for a whole group of excercises (ie: push ups straight to pull ups straight to tricep dips with no breather) I'm sure this is not optimal from a muscular development point of view but to me it more closely mimics the efforts in a race and definitely seems to help the upper body cope better in those situations.

  14. #14
    Formerly of Kent
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikerbert View Post
    Whose in the gym a few times a week when they aren't riding?
    This implies that one is not riding those days of the week. Why wouldn't I be riding 6 or 7 days a week?

  15. #15
    g3h6o3
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimification View Post
    For that reason I try to do push ups, pull ups, planks etc. when I can (usually once or twice a week, just at home). Recently I've switched to jumping from one exercise straight to another for a whole group of excercises (ie: push ups straight to pull ups straight to tricep dips with no breather) I'm sure this is not optimal from a muscular development point of view but to me it more closely mimics the efforts in a race and definitely seems to help the upper body cope better in those situations.
    This is basically why I think Crossfit is a great complementary workout.
    Check out my SportTracks plugins for some training aid software.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by WR304 View Post
    By doing fairly easy sessions twice per week it spreads the work load out even more, allowing you to vary different body part exercises contained in each session. If you were only doing one maintenance session per week then it means either doing a much longer session, (in order to fit all the different exercises in), a two week gap between doing exercises if you're varying sessions or limiting the exercises you do.
    I can do PLENTY in 30 minutes to achieve a full-body workout, if maintaining strength is the only goal. I've done this 2x/week until now and am considering cutting back to 1x/week to free up time to ride/recover more.

    Pullups, dips, (light) deadlifts (with roughly my bodyweight on the bar), pushup variations, overhead press, planks/roman chair work... done. Have been doing 3 circuits (one set of upper body pulling, upper body pushing, lower body, core, then rest until next circuit) and it takes ~30 minutes. I think I can do this 1x/week instead and not have any dropoff in strength.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaybo View Post
    Lift weights because you don't want bigger legs and a skinny upper body. Not a good look
    You shouldn't confuse thin with weak. When it comes to a sport like cycling it isn't necessarily the same thing.

    When I was lying by the road side with a dislocated left clavicle and broken left femur last August a passer by commented that I should put some weight on. She didn't mean it in a nasty way. I can't remember if I replied or not because I was in some mild discomfort at the time.

    Quote Originally Posted by tommyrod74 View Post
    I can do PLENTY in 30 minutes to achieve a full-body workout, if maintaining strength is the only goal. I've done this 2x/week until now and am considering cutting back to 1x/week to free up time to ride/recover more.

    Pullups, dips, (light) deadlifts (with roughly my bodyweight on the bar), pushup variations, overhead press, planks/roman chair work... done. Have been doing 3 circuits (one set of upper body pulling, upper body pushing, lower body, core, then rest until next circuit) and it takes ~30 minutes. I think I can do this 1x/week instead and not have any dropoff in strength.
    Those exercises would be nice to do.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by WR304 View Post



    Those exercises would be nice to do.
    I'm very fortunate that a bad clavicle break (in 6 pieces, now have a titanium plate and 6 screws) a year ago has completely healed with no ill effects or loss of ROM. Even full-range dips are fine now, and I can do a full gymnastic bridge again.

    What former injuries are you working around?

  19. #19
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    Are you lifting weights in season?

    There are a few other things too but these are the main areas that make exercises tricky.

    Right shoulder - dislocated four times, operated on but it's weak
    Left shoulder - dislocated clavicle (also known as seperated shoulder), not too bad really
    Left elbow and humerus - shattered, very limited movement in elbow and it's crunchy

    My right leg was broken and has a titanium pin down the femur but apart from that it works normally.

    Left leg - paralysed from the knee down due to the nerves being crushed
    Left leg - rebuilt left knee joint (90 degrees movement only),
    Left leg- fasciotomy on upper leg, the thigh and some hip muscles were mostly removed. The inside of the leg is a skin graft.
    Left leg- limited range of movement in hip

    The left femur is still healing from when I last broke it in August 2012. In this picture you can see the external fixator which is holding the broken bones together. That's hopefully coming off soon.


  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by WR304 View Post
    There are a few other things too but these are the main areas that make exercises tricky.

    Right shoulder - dislocated four times, operated on but it's weak
    Left shoulder - dislocated clavicle (also known as seperated shoulder), not too bad really
    Left elbow and humerus - shattered, very limited movement in elbow and it's crunchy

    My right leg was broken and has a titanium pin down the femur but apart from that it works normally.

    Left leg - paralysed from the knee down due to the nerves being crushed
    Left leg - rebuilt left knee joint (90 degrees movement only),
    Left leg- fasciotomy on upper leg, the thigh and some hip muscles were mostly removed. The inside of the leg is a skin graft.
    Left leg- limited range of movement in hip

    The left femur is still healing from when I last broke it in August 2012. In this picture you can see the external fixator which is holding the broken bones together. That's hopefully coming off soon.

    Wow. I hope you get the fixator removed soon. I can see how working around those injuries might make getting a full workout more time-intensive.

    How difficult is it to ride with the fixator? Or do you have to wait until it's removed to do so?

    Good luck with the continuing rehab. There are so many people who have none of these things to contend with but stay on the sofa anyway; I'm more than a little humbled by your perseverance.

  21. #21
    lgh
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    WR304 - OUCH!!

    You are right about the purpose of strength training. It is to correct, prevent, or rehab inherent muscle imbalances that come with riding a bike. The notion that one can squat, lift, or press your cycling muscles into more speed has little to no support.

    Larry

  22. #22
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    I think it's important to be clear on what one hopes to gain by lifting weights.

    With what I'm doing right now, I hope to be more injury-resistant, and possibly keep my top-end sprint going for another several yards.

    If I keep getting to the gym over the winter, I'd hope to raise my maximum speed. For a duration on the order of 15 seconds, but I've been getting into track lately, so they're important seconds.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  23. #23
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    Are you lifting weights in season?

    Quote Originally Posted by tommyrod74 View Post
    Wow. I hope you get the fixator removed soon. I can see how working around those injuries might make getting a full workout more time-intensive.

    How difficult is it to ride with the fixator? Or do you have to wait until it's removed to do so?

    Good luck with the continuing rehab. There are so many people who have none of these things to contend with but stay on the sofa anyway; I'm more than a little humbled by your perseverance.
    Doing exercises nowadays is a case of working around the different niggles without aggravating anything.

    I've been walking outdoors on crutches every day for the last few months, along with doing weight training and exercises to try and get back into some sort of shape.

    I haven't been able to do any cycling though, not even turbo training, since 18 August 2012. The problem with the external fixator is that it heavily restricts knee movement. The titanium pins drilled into the thigh stop the skin moving when you bend the knee. If you try and bend too much the skin ovalises around the pins, leaving open wounds. That's bad news as open wounds make it easier to pick up infections. Once it's off I'll be able to bend my knee to 90 degrees again, which is enough to use a custom crank, but for now it's only bending to 75 degrees or so.

    The operation to remove it is supposed to be Friday 7th June.

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/he...S-surgery.html

    That will be under general anaesthetic but should only be day surgery. After that it will be non weight bearing for a few weeks (the holes where the fixator pins are drilled into the bone have to fill in a little) and then I ought to be able to start off with some light turbo training.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by WR304 View Post
    There are a few other things too but these are the main areas that make exercises tricky.

    Right shoulder - dislocated four times, operated on but it's weak
    Left shoulder - dislocated clavicle (also known as seperated shoulder), not too bad really
    Left elbow and humerus - shattered, very limited movement in elbow and it's crunchy

    My right leg was broken and has a titanium pin down the femur but apart from that it works normally.

    Left leg - paralysed from the knee down due to the nerves being crushed
    Left leg - rebuilt left knee joint (90 degrees movement only),
    Left leg- fasciotomy on upper leg, the thigh and some hip muscles were mostly removed. The inside of the leg is a skin graft.
    Left leg- limited range of movement in hip

    The left femur is still healing from when I last broke it in August 2012. In this picture you can see the external fixator which is holding the broken bones together. That's hopefully coming off soon.
    If these are all cycling injuries, I may reconsider my choice of hobby

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    I think it's important to be clear on what one hopes to gain by lifting weights.
    I find that doing upper body workouts helps a lot with endurance when descending but also on technical climbs where you really need your upper body to power through steeps and rocky uphill sections.
    Check out my SportTracks plugins for some training aid software.

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