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  1. #1
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    XC racer's HOT FOOT!

    ****, it burns!
    ****, I cannot ride more than 90 minutes without it's flames licking the soles of my feet!

    I've tried almost everything and almost every product on the market.

    Friction causes the hot spots, but what's causing the friction? It feels like my feet are solid inside my shoes (and I've tried over 5 different brands of shoes), so there is no slipping or sliding and, thus, no friction...

    Anybody here have the 411 on this hot foot?

    Thx!

  2. #2
    LMN
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    Have you tried custom insoles?

    My uneducated guess is Hot Foot is caused nerve pain. There is pressure point some where, that is bothering you.

    Just as an experiment, see if riding with your shoes really loose gets rid of it.
    "The best pace is suicide pace, and today is a good day to die." Steve Prefontaine

  3. #3
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    I've tried insoles and I've tried riding with loose and tight shoes- all to no avail.

    The irony is that I can RUN (on my feet) 30-50 miles without any issues and the hot foot only bothers me while riding. I recently changed from a 172.5 to a 170mm crank so I wonder the hot foot is positional?

  4. #4
    LMN
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    I just did a little bit of research.

    The cause of Hot Foot in most cases pressure on the nerves when your feet swell. The fixes appear to be wider shoes or larger pedals.

    Why don't you try;
    (1) Kick it old school, go flat pedals and running shoes. If you still have hot foot I am stumped. But if it goes away then it is matter of finding the right shoe and pedal that allows you to be clipped in.
    (2) Go see a good pedorthist who is into cycling. (Should probably be #1)
    "The best pace is suicide pace, and today is a good day to die." Steve Prefontaine

  5. #5
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    How is your bike fit? My hotfoot issues road biking turned out to be of all things, my saddle position. I was too far forward and putting pressure on a nerve in my leg. Weird, but it solved my issue...

  6. #6
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    I went to looser shoes. Also cleat position helped as well. I moved the cleat as far back as possible rather than under the ball of my foot.

  7. #7
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    What pedals? I don't know why but I get hot spots with Crank Bros Candy pedals but am fine when I run Egg Beaters. Try cleat position like others have said as well.

  8. #8
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    XC racer's HOT FOOT!

    I don't mean to tout the Specialized brand like a company rep but I used to work for a dealer and I believe in their system. I'm sure other companies offer similar services as well. Disclaimer over.

    Try getting a BG Fit from a specialist. If you're serious about riding it's a worthy investment. It will investigate your fit, saddle, cleat position, etc to get you the most comfortable riding position. Specialized insoles are also awesome, if you haven't had a chance to try some I recommend them.

    Not unique to Specialized you may try wider shoes and pedals as suggested by others.

  9. #9
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    Thanks for the input. I have always placed my cleats as far forward as possible and I've ridden for over 12 years without issue; however, I have a great deal of room to move my cleats rearward.

    Thx!

  10. #10
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    XC racer's HOT FOOT!

    Are you able to revert to a pedal/ shoe combination that didn't cause foot pain previously?

    Are you having equal amounts of discomfort in both your left and right foot whilst cycling?

    Where is the pain worst? Is it underneath the ball of your foot or elsewhere?

  11. #11
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    I cannot go back to riding the 07' Racer X b/c I sold it along with the mtn shoes that I rode then (Time).

    Yes, the burning and inflammation affects the same location on both feet. Further, it affects both feet while riding my road bike too.

    The location is under the ball of the foot. It starts in the middle of both feet and then radiates toward the lateral edge of each foot.

  12. #12
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    I could be way off base, but both feet in the same area leads me to think bike fit, specifically saddle. Especially if your saddle on down measurments are about the same on both the road bike and MTB... Do you use the same kind of saddle on both bikes?

  13. #13
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    You might be onto something!

    Essentially yes. I use a toupe for road and spesh's phenom for mtn.

    I've been paying very close attention to my fit. I think now that my saddle might be too high, thus causing me to "reach" for the pedals and that might be causing the friction.

    Oddly, I thought last summer (when this problem began) that my saddle was too low b/c the majority of the problem was then, and continues now, on the lateral aspect of each foot. I thought that if my saddle was too low that it might exert undue pressure on the outside of my foot b/c the extra length would probably be applied somewhere along my leg(s). Moreover, I've never had hip, knee, or ankle problems from riding or running.

  14. #14
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    Believe it or not, it may not be friction at all. Just nerve pressure from the saddle causing some funky short circuit of the nerves in your feet causing hot foot...

  15. #15
    lgh
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    Find the best bike fitter in your area. It will cost you some $ upfront but saves money in the long run. OTW you are just guessing and throwing $ and/or time at what you (or we!) think are the solutions.

    Larry

  16. #16
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    I had a few riding partners that were also wrenches and fit specialists, but they moved (as did I) and now that I'm in rural TX, my best fitter is a mirror and/or video of myself on the trainer.

    The goof asses in rural TX think that I'm just some queer in spandex that rides "un' em' bi-sick-els."

  17. #17
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    XC racer's HOT FOOT!

    Whenever you get a comfortable pair of cycling shoes with a cleat position that works you should hang onto them and treasure them. They're worth their weight in gold.

    A burning foot sensation could possibly be down to various medical reasons, not just your shoes. This link lists a few possible non shoe related causes to look at.

    Burning feet: Causes - MayoClinic.com

    As your current setup isn't working I'd suggest starting over. For cleat position you could align them using Steve Hogg's fitting method, as an initial setup for fore-aft position. Find your 1st metatarsal (the bony protrusion behind your big toe) and draw a mark on the shoe at that point. Find your 5th metatarsal (the bony protrusion behind your little toe) and draw a mark on the shoe at that point. Put a ruler between those marks and align the shoe cleat so that it's on that line.

    WHY BIKEFITTERS SHOULDN?T CHEW THEIR NAILS Bike Fit Feet Steve Hogg's Bike Fitting Website

    Steve Hogg fits cleats from Ron Heptinstall on Vimeo.



    Cycling shoe soles vary widely in stiffness. Plastic soled cycling shoes used with small pedals are a classic for causing localised hot foot pain directly above the pedal. A carbon fibre sole is usually stiffer than a plastic shoe sole, which helps spread pressure. Different carbon fibre soles vary in stiffness however, some are much more flexible than others (eg: Specialized BG Expert MTB shoe has a carbon sole but isn't super stiff, Giro Code MTB shoe has a carbon sole with no give at all).

    If you're having hot spots then that may be pressure related. A pedal with a larger surface area in contact with the shoe sole (eg: Shimano M545) will spread the pressure more effectively than a small pedal (eg: Shimano M780), which should help reduce hot spots.

    Fit is a very personal thing. A fastened cycling shoe should hold your foot firmly in place without squashing it. The foot shouldn't be able to move up and down vertically in the shoe, particularly in the toe box. What you can find is that if the shoe is a little too deep you scrunch your toes up inside the shoe to stabilise it, which can cause foot discomfort. If there's any vertical movement, or significant friction, then you might need an extra insole in the shoe.

    Cycling shoe insoles, including custom footbeds, have a nasty habit of being very firm. There's no cushioning provided. What I use in my shoes are Inov8 walking footbeds instead, trimmed to fit. They're cheap, don't absorb water, and have more cushioning across the ball of your foot than a cycling shoe insole provides.




    EP Cycling, Triathlon, Outdoors, CrossFit, and Tactical Inov8 6mm footbed Free Shipping Over $50

    Something else that's cheap and easy to try is socks. If you wear two pairs of thin socks made from a fabric like Coolmax it can reduce friction. The smooth fabric of the two pairs of socks is able to move against each other when your foot flexes in the shoe, rather than rubbing on your foot. (The same idea as wearing a base layer under your jersey, so that if you crash the jersey and base layer slide, saving you from road rash). I find that my feet tend to feel better wearing two pairs of socks rather than one so it might help.

    To try and summarise my suggestions are:

    - Reset your cleat position.
    - Choose pedals with a larger surface area.
    - Shoes with a stiffer carbon sole may help if you're using plastic soled shoes currently.
    - Try walking footbeds in the shoes for additional cushioning.
    - Two pairs of socks for additional cushioning and reduced friction.

  18. #18
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    WR304-
    Thank you very, very much for your in-depth and thorough answer. I truly appreciate your information and your passion for sharing that information.

  19. #19
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    Great post!!

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