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  1. #1
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    What do racers on official teams get?

    I'm curious what the range of benefits the racers who are members of official teams end up getting.
    Most teams seem to be affiliated with a shop so I would imagine a store discount is often (always?) part of the deal.
    Do shops typically pay for the entry fees, cycling licenses for the racers?
    What about jerseys?
    I would also imagine that having racers on the course with you gives you some allies, especially when passing riders in different age groups/categories.
    Do any store sponsored teams allow only bikes that their store carries to be ridden on race day?
    Thanks for any input. I work at a shop, my fiance and I race and we are our shop's "race team." I could see it growing and I'm just curious about some of the different ways the teams work.

  2. #2
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    Coming from the road side of things, and a highly successful club, here's how it was broken down:

    1) "Elite" team*. 7-10 dudes who received free bikes each year, plus one set of race wheels. These were sold off at the end of the season. Several sets of free uniforms (5 or 6, I think), and we got everything at cost or EP from the shop. We were also sponsored by various corporations, to include one well known Mexican food chain. Free burritos kept me alive that summer. I would have wasted away otherwise.

    2) Club team. Multiple levels within the club team, based on how many hours you'd volunteered the previous year. Everyone started off at 10% off MSRP ("Bronze" level) then went up 10% as their level of involvement increased past a certain threshold. Lots of volunteers = lots of awesome events. Even while fully funding the elite team, the club, overall, turned a profit for the shop. The club/shop puts on 20-30 races PER YEAR.

    *This team produces pro road racers fairly often, and the year before I raced for them, was the #1 amateur team in the NRC rankings, ahead of several pro teams. Definitely NOT the average club team, but they do it right, consistently.
    Last edited by Le Duke; 04-17-2013 at 07:14 AM.

  3. #3
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    from my amateur experience as a Cat2 rider on small local bike shop sponsored team, here is what you can expect to get:
    - free one uniform,
    - up to 40% off MSRP discount on bikes, tires, wheels, parts
    - free tune ups and bike maintenance during the season

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by dirtdan View Post
    I work at a shop, my fiance and I race and we are our shop's "race team." I could see it growing and I'm just curious about some of the different ways the teams work.
    Seems that the structure that works for our team is to use the shop for bike and equipment support only. But seek other sponsors to bring cash to the team for racer support and club development.

    We found it best to get local businesses that have an owner or marketing manager that is a cyclist. That way part of it is marketing/advertising for their company, and another part is them supporting a sport they love.

    Link to our team/club site is below. We are updating parts of it for the new season. Organizing a big team/club is always a lot of work and it takes a lot of people to make it happen.
    Last edited by Poncharelli; 04-17-2013 at 06:54 AM.
    Head Coach, Ben Lomond HS MTB Team
    www.utahmtb.org
    Cycling Team and local Club:
    http://www.roostersbikersedge.com/

  5. #5
    more skier than biker
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    Quote Originally Posted by Le Duke View Post
    Coming from the road side of things, and a highly successful club, here's how it was broken down:

    1) "Elite" team*. 7-10 dudes who received free bikes each year, plus one set of race wheels. These were sold off at the end of the season. Several sets of free uniforms (5 or 6, I think), and we got everything at cost or EP from the shop. We were also sponsored by various corporations, to include one well known Mexican food chain. Free burritos kept me alive that summer. I would have wasted away otherwise.

    2) Club team. Multiple levels within the club team, based on how many hours you'd volunteered the previous year. Everyone started off at 10% off MSRP ("Bronze" level) then went up 10% as their level of involvement increased past a certain threshold. Lots of volunteers = lots of awesome events. Even while fully funding the elite team, the club, overall, turned a profit for the shop. The club/shop puts on 20-30 races PER YEAR.

    *This team produces pro road racers fairly often, and the year before I raced for them, was the #1 amateur team in the NRC rankings, ahead of several pro teams. Definitely NOT the average club team, but they do it right, consistently.
    Good model^

    My local shop is starting to put in a similar structure for their MTB team. They have a strong road team, which follows a similar model to what you describe above, but this year the shop's management also created an "Elite MTB Team" that is separate, and much smaller, from the normal "club team". The Elite team is definitely a different level of racing and training and commitment (i.e. Open Pro Level), and the perks and sponsorship support reflect that...the level of sponsorship on the Elite MTB Team is similar to what you described for your Elite road team example.

  6. #6
    DLd
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    Reimbursement of race entry fees for podiums was a nice perk on one of my teams. It just seems like a win-win. Be sure to get them nice podium pics in the team jersey for their website/blog.
    "Great things are not accomplished by those who yield to trends and fads and popular opinion."-Jack Kerouac

  7. #7
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    Great input! Thanks everyone.

  8. #8
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    Hi All - Bumping this again as I have been charged with starting a team and would like to get more info from other riders about what they are getting from their shops/teams.

  9. #9
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    I'm on the local shop team.

    -15% off everything but bikes more if its a big purchase, bike discounts depend on how much the bike cost the shop.
    -Free kit every time there is a new design usually about every 2-3years.
    -The only people asked to join the team are those riding a bike that can be purchased at the shop. Probably wouldn't be kicked off if you bought a bike they didn't sell but it would be frowned upon. Mostly members of the team are loyal customers or employees of the shop which is how they got invited to the team.
    -We don't take ourselves to seriously so usually instead of helping each other on course we're more likely to talk smack and try to get the other teammate to mess up.

  10. #10
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    I pay dues and buy my kit. But we get good deals on parts from a couple component sponsors, two QBP orders a year through our shop sponsor at a good deal, partial race reimbursement for every race and podium bonuses.

    I think racing costs me less, net, as a member of the team.

    More importantly, the team does a lot of training stuff that I can join. I was never able to take advantage of that stuff as much as I wanted to, but that was the real reason I joined. Rides, on- and off-road, cyclocross practices, and computrainer series.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  11. #11
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    Not to be too db or curmudgeon-ish but this is really the wrong way to do it. We more or less ask "what can/do you do for our community/team".

    Being on a team isn't about getting stuff.

    Now that I'm done with my soapbox...

    what we give:
    • cost + 20% on parts & orders
    • team pricing on kits/bikes/frames
    • Beer from sponsors for team events/post race
    • Coffee from sponsor
    • Generous discount on meals from primary sponsor
    • whatever discount from lower level sponsors (from free to 20%)
    • cash for podiums at select events - minimum (intended) race requirement
    • Race reimbursement - minimum (intended) race requirement


    What we expect:
    • 20 hrs community service - could be trail maintenance, helping w/ HS team... you name it
    • Volunteering at 2 races


    Remember, the people you select will represent you and any sponsors you have. Don't be afraid to get rid of the jackoffs.
    Last edited by Walt Disney's Frozen Head; 02-28-2014 at 10:43 AM. Reason: formatting

  12. #12
    mnoutain bkie rdier
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    Quote Originally Posted by Le Duke View Post
    Coming from the road side of things, and a highly successful club, here's how it was broken down:

    1) "Elite" team*. 7-10 dudes who received free bikes each year, plus one set of race wheels. These were sold off at the end of the season. Several sets of free uniforms (5 or 6, I think), and we got everything at cost or EP from the shop. We were also sponsored by various corporations, to include one well known Mexican food chain. Free burritos kept me alive that summer. I would have wasted away otherwise.

    2) Club team. Multiple levels within the club team, based on how many hours you'd volunteered the previous year. Everyone started off at 10% off MSRP ("Bronze" level) then went up 10% as their level of involvement increased past a certain threshold. Lots of volunteers = lots of awesome events. Even while fully funding the elite team, the club, overall, turned a profit for the shop. The club/shop puts on 20-30 races PER YEAR.

    *This team produces pro road racers fairly often, and the year before I raced for them, was the #1 amateur team in the NRC rankings, ahead of several pro teams. Definitely NOT the average club team, but they do it right, consistently.
    Nice. Sounds similar to our club/team. In fact, Chris Horner was on our team as an amateur and we have some guys on our DET who are winning races in Europe right now.

    What your team offers is on the generous side of things, but given your team's success, it only makes sense to continue the perks to draw in the talent.

    If you don't mind me asking, what team is this you speak of?

    @Dan...if you are starting a shop team and you expect to have elite (Cat 1) mtb podium type riders, then they will expect a heavy discount from the shop. Cost on bikes etc is standard for elite riders. It is a real turn off when shops turn a profit on their select few riders that are suffering away daily as "pedaling billboards" for a shop. Not cool. On the other hand, make sure you find guys/gals who are social/nice people. No shop needs a jerk on board. Also, creating a great kit is key. Who wants to pedal around for 12+ hours a week in a crappy kit?

    Also, create an incentive program where the incentive where Cat 1 is higher than Cat 3. This will motivate your riders to step things up and make it to the next level. Maybe offer race reimbursement at the end of the season "for all racers completing minimum of 10 races" sorta thing. Keep that money aside and guarantee it will happen for those who qualify.

    Also, maybe free kits at the end of the second year for all returning riders.

    Yes, your shop will expect your team to be on shop brand carried bikes! Not always necessary, but if you are offering bikes at cost...it naturally happens..haha.

  13. #13
    Formerly of Kent
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    Quote Originally Posted by rydbyk View Post

    If you don't mind me asking, what team is this you speak of?
    ABD. Athletes by Design.

    Riders of note: Frank Pipp, Reid Mumford, Bryce Mead, Kirk O'Bee, Micheal Sherer, Sarah Tillotson, and a couple more that I can't of right now.

  14. #14
    spec4life???..smh...
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    Mine is primarily a road team and not a "shop team", so this may not help.

    We get various discounts from our various secondary sponsors (restaurants, a bike shop, clothes, etc.) on top of the discount on coaching services we get from our title sponsor.

    The primary benefit is a lot of free team clothing. The more you race the more money you have toward team clothing orders. Up to around 500 credit on team priced clothing.

    The team expects at a minimum to help out with the various rides and races we put on a year.

    The real benefit of a team for me though is having someone to train and go to the races with.

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  16. #16
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    I wouldn't mind becoming part of a mtb team but being out in Brentwood I kinda in the middle of nowhere and everywhere at the same time. Sure we have a ton of local dirt to ride but it's all fire roads and super steep so it's hard for mtbing to gain any traction out here. It's ether 1. your a long time mtber like myself and hate riding fire roads all day, or 2. your new to the sport and love riding anything that's dirt but damn these constant 20% climbs are making this no fun. Because of this we don't have a local shop in town, there's a couple a few cities over but they are very small shops that I think only give minor support like 15% on parts to roadie teams.

    I do however have a guy a met a few years ago through another friend, we did a couple big group rides together and we always have good people showing up. Then I got out of mtbing for a couple years(yeah I know that was stupid) and lost touch with him and the group. Fast forward to a few months ago, I uploading my random rides to strava with a few KOM's and he contacts we out of the blue and says to join his strava club. I go and check it out and it got 150 members , That may not seem like a lot but those 150 member are all mtb's so I think it's a cool deal. It' not an offcial or anything, it's just a bunch of mtber who like to ride mtbs and are based in the east-bay. I guess over the couple years while the ranks have swelled they have gotten together and made jerseys to the members just by cost sharing within the group. They do have one particular shop with most employees who regular the group rides so this year with a new jersey design if you purchase a jersey you'll receive 15% off parts from said shop. I figure because the new jerseys looked so cool I'd buy two and because the group/club/team isn't pushing for results or commitments but instead just has that chill attitude that drew us into mtbing in the first place, I will support them.

    I've always had a hard time with asking for help or free stuff. Even as a top superbike racer in the US I always felt weird asking for free helmets when I could still get by my with my old stuff, even though shoei was willing to give me whatever I wanted. You'd have to approach me with sponsorship if anything was to ever happen and It worked fine that way for awhile, I got lots of support and I took great pride and gave everything I had in the races to show my gratitude to those who sought me out. Alas when the economy went down hill and superbike racing sponsors tightening there budgets the money just started to walk away from the sport and with it my ability to pay for the habit with the habit so I retired.

    I've always had a hard time with training in any traditional sense so I never live up to my potential but If I ever get someone to back me with some support I know I'll do everything in my power to return the favor. I'm not sure why but I love the idea of being that unknown guy with little to no sponsors who can win against the well established teams, but I don't think I'll ever shake the desire to root for the underdog. Maybe this new club will push me that little bit to cross that threshold and maybe I'll find that someone who wants to see me rise to the top.

    Sorry for the log post but the short of it is I would love to get involved with a small team(underdogs) or even newly establish bike company who want shake things up in the results with the big names.

  17. #17
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    These days its not typical that anyone but a "elite" rider will get a bike. Most shops will give discounts, some will pay for race fees and most will give you a couple of team kits.
    I've seen several "elite" " pro's" locally that must have lied on their resume, because I'll catch and pass them and I usually start 5 minutes behind them.
    Whatever is offered from a shop, manufacturer, whatever, take it, as a sponsor, they want at least a 10x return on investment.....so what you see mostly at races are riders who mostly support their own racing habit and there is nothing wrong with that.

  18. #18
    I should be out riding
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hurricane Jeff View Post
    ..so what you see mostly at races are riders who mostly support their own racing habit and there is nothing wrong with that.
    Not only is there nothing wrong with that, it's preferable IMO. I'm always surprised at the importance some midpack masters racers place on chasing discounts. Sponsorship at the amateur level is really more of shifting of costs anyway, so personally I'd just soon buy products from companies that don't needlessly inflate the cost of a product to me to justify a discount to someone else.

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    I can't answer from a xc racers perspective but from being a long time r/c sponsored driver I can tell you that the first level is 50% off msrp. Free t-shirt, discounted shipping were also a few of the perks. Basically it's a way for a serious racer to cut costs so he/she can spend more on traveling. It ended up that being 50% off didn't save me much cause I purchased 2 of everything . The trouble with sponsorship is the commitment on the drivers part. I own a small auto repair business in IL and at times almost live there. So traveling to 8-9 large races is kinda tough. The races usually start on Thursdays and end Sunday.

    The idea of sponsorship is awesome! As a Cat 3 rider I'm no where near where I need to be to be considered for any team. But my LBS gives me a 15% discount on parts and a small break on clothes. I don't ride for them. Nor do I race their brand of bikes, but I support them enough with the extras I purchase.

  20. #20
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Re: What do racers on official teams get?

    Quote Originally Posted by ACree View Post
    Not only is there nothing wrong with that, it's preferable IMO. I'm always surprised at the importance some midpack masters racers place on chasing discounts. Sponsorship at the amateur level is really more of shifting of costs anyway, so personally I'd just soon buy products from companies that don't needlessly inflate the cost of a product to me to justify a discount to someone else.
    Very good point.

    In reality, I've been riding with teams for the opportunity to ride with teammates. I re-upped my membership this year because I really liked being a part of my team at the track last year.

    I figure on net costs, the team is probably a wash. I may buy somewhat nicer gear, but with EBay and the discount sites, I think I still could, without spending a lot (or any?) more.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

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    Coming from a background of Motocross (held my AMA Outdoor Pro License for a couple years) and just getting into this MTB thing, I figured I'd kind of do my own thing with some past moto sponsors and BMX racing days sponsors. Put some sponsors together, designed my own custom kit (have matching bib shorts), had the kit made, and hopefully ride the wheels off this bike this year haha


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    Quote Originally Posted by superx421 View Post
    Coming from a background of Motocross (held my AMA Outdoor Pro License for a couple years) and just getting into this MTB thing, I figured I'd kind of do my own thing with some past moto sponsors and BMX racing days sponsors. Put some sponsors together, designed my own custom kit (have matching bib shorts), had the kit made, and hopefully ride the wheels off this bike this year haha

    In ultra running we use plastic bins to stage our supplies at certain point of the race. With me comeing off a 7 year career of super bike racing I chose to cover my boxed in Moto sponsor sticker just for the hell of it, and I got GPR stickers on my 66mm carbon road wheels.

  23. #23
    mnoutain bkie rdier
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    Quote Originally Posted by superx421 View Post
    Coming from a background of Motocross (held my AMA Outdoor Pro License for a couple years) and just getting into this MTB thing, I figured I'd kind of do my own thing with some past moto sponsors and BMX racing days sponsors. Put some sponsors together, designed my own custom kit (have matching bib shorts), had the kit made, and hopefully ride the wheels off this bike this year haha



    Impressive sponsors for not really racing mtb at all yet.. You racing cat 1 already? Just curious.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by rydbyk View Post
    Impressive sponsors for not really racing mtb at all yet.. You racing cat 1 already? Just curious.
    Cat 1....haha.....not at all and don't claim to even been at their level yet....Cat 3 is what I will be racing this year since it is my first year racing MTB. I grew up racing BMX for 10 years (literally probably 45 weekends out of the year every year all across the nation) and then transitioned into motocross where I had some decent success (enough success to earn my Pro License although that didn't amount to much of anything due to injuries). Just got ahold of some of my longtime past sponsors that I had built good relationships with (along with a couple new ones), informed them of my plans to venture into MTB, and now here we are. Hopefully all goes well and I can achieve some of my goals I have set for myself over the next 5 years......in yet another 2-wheeled sport :-)

  25. #25
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    If you have any fitness at all, start in Cat. 2.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

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