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  1. #51
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    I hear you and its all good, no hard feelings, just a good discussion going on, like it should.

    Lactic acid is nobody's enemy. I think you focus too much on the "overall" fitness aspect and forget the specificity principle.

    Any MTBer should focus on improving at least a few important things fitness-wise: their FTP, their AWC and power, their vo2max power, in no particular order.

    I dont get the relation between body fat % and improving overall fitness, they're not interdependant. At some point which comes after a few good training years, improving overall fitness and physical condition wont do much for your cycling, or, at least, will do a lot worst then pedaling your bike in a meaningful way.

    RE pushing your limits, it can be done on the bike, but I think what you mean is more on the psychological side of things. Bring on any gym-beast who's decent at cycling against a real competitive cyclist, the gym beast doesnt stand a chance. Why? Because his physiology simply doesnt match the cyclist's one. The hability to overcome fatigue CAN be strengthened in the gym, the question is what kind of fatigue are we refering to here?

    Since this is a cycling forum: endurance cycling involves metabolical fatigue coming from different energy production systems. To be a more powerful cyclist, one needs to improve his central and peripheal adaptations to increase/push the "threshold" (loose term) at which will come that fatigue. The main goal in cycling is producing as much power as possible while using as little energy as possible all that resulting in as little fatigue as possible. Improving power at different length of time should be a priority for any cyclist who wants to become faster.

    People often make easy assumptions based on popular beliefs which often end up being total myth or crooked logical conclusions. Cycling training is literally filled with myths and exemples based on pros or "reknown" coaches. Yet, those coaches would touch my training plan with a 10 foot pole.

    I'd reiterate the following important bit of the discussion: it really comes down to who you are, what you need: individualisation.

    Although I think the discussion is aimed at getting better at cycling using weight lifting for the legs.

    Could you define more precisely what you are refering to when speaking of gym work etc? Is it weight lifting? Plyos? X-fit? Max strength?

  2. #52
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    Subscribed for so great information!

    Thanks guys!

    Sent from my DROID BIONIC using Tapatalk 2

  3. #53
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    I think the discussion here is awesome!! Informative, and enjoyable! Thank you all!!

  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by RiotMTB View Post
    I think the discussion here is awesome!! Informative, and enjoyable! Thank you all!!
    Agree.

    Some links worth reading and contemplating...

    Does Weight Training Benefit Cycling? Yes


    Strength train off the bike, not on it!!

    Weekly strength training during the racing season makes cyclists faster


    I did hypertrophy session #1 last night on the legs and am feeling it today....

  5. #55
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    Good luck getting on and off the toilet.

  6. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by limba View Post
    Good luck getting on and off the toilet.


    With all this training, I'll easily be able to squat in the woods come summer....

  7. #57
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    Ill state the obvious. Lifting weights make you strong long term, but weak in the short term.

    If you are fine with heavy legs for a couple days after your weight workouts, go for it. I personally dont like that feeling in my legs so I dont do it. I am a firm believer in specificity.

    Remember we are racing mountain bikes. Most of us are not sprinting on the road or track.

    Though I do pushups/pull ups once a week to hold my arm warmers up though
    Raised in a Chicken-Coop by Chickens

  8. #58
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    Even for sprinting on the road, weight lifting is useless.

    Track standing starts, yes.

    I properly planned weight lifting plan shouldnt affect your on the bike training much, if not at all.

  9. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by Devincicx View Post
    I properly planned weight lifting plan shouldnt affect your on the bike training much, if not at all.
    True.

    Good thoughts on the frequency being needed is actually less here.

  10. #60
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    A lot to consider, thanks everyone.
    Lately I've been skipping rope and have focused on my shoulder and abdominal work outs. I was a bit of a hefty toad for a while, but riding bikes helped me lose a lot of that weight. Now my body is suffering a little. For a while, I only got into shape to be better at riding. Now I know riding needs to be a part of staying in shape.



    Sent from my Desire HD using Tapatalk 2

  11. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by Devincicx View Post
    weight lifting has little to do with endurance cycling sprints and steep hills, same goes for bone density.
    Others would disagree with you in terms of weight lifting and bone density.

    Cycling and Bone Health: Why Cyclists MUST Lift Weights AnthonyColpo



    References

    1. Stein J. Cyclists at risk for bone loss. LA Times, February 16, 2009.
    http://articles.latimes.com/2009/feb.../he-cycling162. Frost HM. Why do marathon runners have less bone than weight lifters? A vital-biomechanical view and explanation. Bone, Mar 1997; 20 (3): 183-189.
    3. Karlsson MK, et al. Bone mineral density in weight lifters. Calcified Tissue International, 1993; 52 (3): 212-215.
    4. Mudd LM, et al. Bone mineral density in collegiate female athletes: comparisons among sports. Journal of Athletic Training, 2007 Jul-Sep; 42 (3): 403-408.
    5. Magkos F, et al. The bone response to non-weight-bearing exercise is sport-, site-, and sex-specific. Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine, Mar 2007; 17 (2): 123-128.
    6. Rector RS, et al. Participation in road cycling vs running is associated with lower bone mineral density in men. Metabolism, Feb 2008; 57 (2): 226-232.
    7. Campion F, et al. Bone status in professional cyclists. International Journal of Sports Medicine, Jul 2010; 31 (7): 511-515.
    8. Nichols JF, et al. Low bone mineral density in highly trained male master cyclists. Osteoporosis International, Aug 2003; 14 (8): 644-649.
    9. Sabo D, et al. Bone quality in the lumbar spine in high-performance athletes. European Spine Journal, 1996; 5 (4): 258263.
    10. Warner SE, et al. Bone mineral density of competitive male mountain and road cyclists. Bone, Jan 2002; 30 (1): 281-286.
    11. Wilks DC, et al. Forearm and tibial bone measures of distance- and sprint-trained master cyclists. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, Mar 2009; 41 (3): 566-573.




  12. #62
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    it surely is better then cycling alone, but would not be a wise choice for someone who wants to work on bone density. Higher impact sports would be my choice, not weight lifting, it serves other purposes.

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