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  1. #1
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    Weight gain this season????

    I worked all winter to drop some weight. I went from 180 last fall to 168 as of April 1st. I started training more when it got warmer out which was the end of march. I'm up to 10-12 hours a week. For some reason, i went up to 172, then it was 175ish. This morning.... 182. No change in diet. Just more training and I even dropped most of the weight training... Besides core. I don't feel or look any different, but this can't be all muscle. Anyone with more experience then me have a rational explanation for this.

  2. #2
    lgh
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    1. You are actually eating more or different than during the winter (easy for some stuff to slip into your diet if you are not dilligent)

    and/or

    2. You are exercising in a different way than during the winter.

    Larry

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    1) i dont think thats it. if I did eat more food, its all "healthy" food. Oatmeal, salads, organic meats. Stuff like that. On a rare occasion, maybe pizza or a burger. But i did that in the winter
    2)Went from 6-7 hours in the winter with weights and trainer days alternating. Now its all riding with some core work. How could I gain weight from adding 4-5 more hours a week. If I do eat more, I should burn it off. Its just starting to frustrate me. How much more am I going to gain. Ill be racing the clydesdales by the end of the year...Ha ha

  4. #4
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    Proper hydration? I started dieting, more like lifestyle changes last September. I am now down from 182 to hovering around 153-155. It is very hot and humid here, and I have found that the more water I drink during the day, not just when training, the more stable my weight stays. It's almost as if when I don't drink enough, my body hoards what is has and my weight rises a bit.
    More than just the weight, I look much leaner, have dropped 2-3 inches in the waistline, and have "shrunk" quite a bit. If you're still looking the same as you say, it could be some muscle added, but that does sound like a lot in a short time.

  5. #5
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    I was thinking it could be hydration also. As the season got close, I started really paying attention to my water intake and drink allot more water through out the day. Could be water retension and muscle.. I dont know.

  6. #6
    lgh
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    Quote Originally Posted by k6monster View Post
    1) i dont think thats it. if I did eat more food, its all "healthy" food. Oatmeal, salads, organic meats. Stuff like that. On a rare occasion, maybe pizza or a burger. But i did that in the winter
    2)Went from 6-7 hours in the winter with weights and trainer days alternating. Now its all riding with some core work. How could I gain weight from adding 4-5 more hours a week. If I do eat more, I should burn it off. Its just starting to frustrate me. How much more am I going to gain. Ill be racing the clydesdales by the end of the year...Ha ha
    Hey, some of them clydes are FAST!!

    There is a tremendous misunderstanding of the relationship between diet, exercise, and weight. The common problem is "I've stopped losing my gut even though I'm biking x hours a week and eating well." The common reponse is "You have to keep biking and you will lose it." i.e. Keep doing what hasn't been working. It's kinda like your problem.

    For sure, I can tell you that you are eating more and not knowing it and/or your hormone mix is different than last winter. I doubt it is hydration.

    Larry
    Last edited by lgh; 06-18-2011 at 09:33 AM.

  7. #7
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    I can sympathize, but my increase hasn't been as severe.

    I am ~10 pounds over where I want to be, which was where I was at the end of last season. I spent much of the winter lifting weights, same as you. I added about 8 pounds. Now, as I am trying to trim back down, my weight is slowly increasing.

    I was actually gaining slower when I was eating 3500 calories a day than now, below 2000.

  8. #8
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    I'm resting for 5 days now and I'm putting on weight

  9. #9
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    I would say that it would be down to balance, start just for a week tracking your diet and your exercise and see what the balance is, you would be amazed at the actual numbers compared to what you think. Training peaks is quite good for this if you have the time to set it up. if not just try and start a book with everything in it. you would be amazed at what you are actually doing.

    Every once in a while I really track what I am doing then I keep myself a little more honest and I realize that I need to eat way more then what I am eating, or I need to ride my bike way more then what I am actually doing.
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  10. #10
    lgh
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    Yes, keep a diary. That should go without saying. Some of the diaries are a bit too compulsive if you ask me but at least for riding/exercise everyone should keep a diary. They are great for trouble shooting. (Like figuring out how I screwed up my back doing 20 plus minute out of the saddle intervals last winter. That was pretty stupid.)

    Larry

  11. #11
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    pretty simple: you are eating too much!!! if you are gaining weight it is because you are running a calorie surplus. it is that simple. your weight will fluctuate a little from water, but if you are weighing yourself daily at the same time everyday most of that variance can be taken out of the equation.

    you need to count calories. there is an iphone app called loseit that works for me (i think you can use it online too). it allows you to count cals and track diet composition (fat, protein, carbs, etc.).

    the most basic formula is: Daily metobolic rate + calories burned during exercise - calorie intake = deficit/surplus. you should also pay attention to composition and adjust to your training plan. different intensities require different nutrition.

    if you want to lose, determine how much per week and adjust accordingly. the tricky part of the equation is figuring out your metobolic rate and calories burned during exercise. you will have to start with a baseline and tweak it to your body according to the results you are getting.

    i started at 196 in dec after a year off of racing and i am at 170 now. now i find myself forcing myself to eat to maintain this weight. IMO nutrution is the hardest part to figure out about training.

    hope this helps and good luck!

  12. #12
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    U might want to take a look at "Why we get fat" by Taubes, or watch the documentary "Fat Head" on Hulu. Both explain paradigms for weight gain, namely:

    Calories in minus calories out is not a good model because calories out (your base metabolic rate) is highly variable depending on how you eat.
    Starving yourself doesn't work well.
    What sets your fat composition is the types of food you eat, not how much.
    A low fat high carbohydrate diet is actually fattening (all that oatmeal)
    If you have the right type of diet, you don't have to worry about eating too much or going hungry, instead relying on the body's natural feedback mechanism for satiety.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by beanbag View Post
    U might want to take a look at "Why we get fat" by Taubes, or watch the documentary "Fat Head" on Hulu. Both explain paradigms for weight gain, namely:

    Calories in minus calories out is not a good model because calories out (your base metabolic rate) is highly variable depending on how you eat.
    Starving yourself doesn't work well.
    What sets your fat composition is the types of food you eat, not how much.
    A low fat high carbohydrate diet is actually fattening (all that oatmeal)
    If you have the right type of diet, you don't have to worry about eating too much or going hungry, instead relying on the body's natural feedback mechanism for satiety.
    so quick google of this Taubes guy and this is what i get: "Taubes offers an alternative viewpoint: no carbs. While his recommendation to eliminate carbohydrates (grains, fruits, sugars, etc.) from one’s diet is not necessarily a new one, Taubes does present compelling supporting evidence that many, if not all, people should consider at least severely limiting carbohydrates in their diet."

    really. let me ask this again: REALLY? i suggest that you don't take any advice that this Taubes fellow has to offer. no carbs for an endurance athlete is idiotic. endurance athletes have way different needs than the average fat-faced population. there are better books out there like 'nutrition for endurance athletes' by Monique Ryan and 'racing weight' (not sure of the author off the top of my head). bottom line: you need to know YOUR body. calories in/calories out DOES work once you have enough data (via your diary) to know how much you burn during a particular type of workout and your daily caloric needs. start with a base and tweak.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by k6monster View Post
    I worked all winter to drop some weight. I went from 180 last fall to 168 as of April 1st. I started training more when it got warmer out which was the end of march. I'm up to 10-12 hours a week. For some reason, i went up to 172, then it was 175ish. This morning.... 182. No change in diet. Just more training and I even dropped most of the weight training... Besides core. I don't feel or look any different, but this can't be all muscle. Anyone with more experience then me have a rational explanation for this.
    Are you comparing like with like? i.e. using the same scales each time and weighing yourself in the same clothes at the same time of day each time. You can get fluctuations of 3 to 5 pounds if you measure yourself at different times of the day.

    If you had a meal immediately before weighing yourself for example that would make you appear heavier than weighing yourself on an empty stomach. You can also appear to have lost weight if you weigh yourself immediately after a hard session where you've sweated out fluid which hasn't been replaced yet.

    If you're being consistent with the measuring then the first thing to look at is your diet. If you've been backing away from the diet in the expectation that you can eat more due to the increased cycling that's one possible reason for the weight gain. It's easy to overestimate how much food you need to eat when increasing the miles on the bike. After a long ride you're hungry and can end up overeating post ride if you aren't careful.

    The calories burnt figure estimated by a heart rate monitor for example will often be much higher than the amount of calories you actually burnt during the ride. Eating too much of any food can lead to weight gain if you're consistently eating more calories than you burn during the day.

    Another possibility is that the difference in weight between April and now is largely water weight. The weight you lost over the winter was mostly water and it went straight back on when you ended your diet, which is why you're back at the same body weight as you were last year again. That could explain at least some of the weight gain.

    Weight Related Water Retention
    "One of the main causes of weight-related water retention can be attributed to sodium intake, particularly from processed foods. In addition, since sodium is present in all foods, a higher intake of food in general also contributes to weight gain from fat stores and subsequent water retention.

    People dieting may experience frustrations in weight fluctuations related to water retention. Many people turn to diuretics or water pills, which create a false sense of weight loss. Reducing calories too quickly also forces the body to use up stores of carbohydrates and breakdown protein in the muscles, which also leads to [a loss of] water weight stored in those cells - sometimes with up to 75% of weight loss related to water weight. However, after calorie ingestion is resumed to a normal level, the water weight is restored as well."
    nativeremedies.com

    http://www.nativeremedies.com/ailmen...on-causes.html

    .
    Last edited by WR304; 06-18-2011 at 12:10 PM.

  15. #15
    lgh
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    k6monster - Many find the Paleo Diet and Paleo Diet for Athletes work very well for weight issues. I understand why some disagree with some of the Paleo ideology'philosophy but the fact of the matter is that very few would argue the eating plan they entail is not good. Basically, you eat like an endurance athlete right after exercise and then eat like, well, an animal at other times. And you don't need to know the science since the mechanics are pretty much laid out for you. I've been around the "healthy eating" thing my whole life and I think the Paleo method is great.

    One thing that is good to know regardless of how you eat is that there is a general consensus building that excessive grains are a primary source of problems in our diet. High fructose corn syrup is also something to keep an eye on. It's everywhere (subsidized by our wonderful guvment) and not really good for much.

    Larry
    Last edited by lgh; 06-19-2011 at 06:27 AM.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by gbell614 View Post
    so quick google of this Taubes guy and this is what i get: "Taubes offers an alternative viewpoint: no carbs. While his recommendation to eliminate carbohydrates (grains, fruits, sugars, etc.) from one’s diet is not necessarily a new one, Taubes does present compelling supporting evidence that many, if not all, people should consider at least severely limiting carbohydrates in their diet."

    really. let me ask this again: REALLY? i suggest that you don't take any advice that this Taubes fellow has to offer. no carbs for an endurance athlete is idiotic. endurance athletes have way different needs than the average fat-faced population. there are better books out there like 'nutrition for endurance athletes' by Monique Ryan and 'racing weight' (not sure of the author off the top of my head). bottom line: you need to know YOUR body. calories in/calories out DOES work once you have enough data (via your diary) to know how much you burn during a particular type of workout and your daily caloric needs. start with a base and tweak.
    You should read the book to learn about the relationship between carbs and fat accumulation. It's not for endurance atheletes. You can read Paleo Diet for Athletes for that.

  17. #17
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    i too struggle with weight gain this time of year.

    in the winter/spring i am super lean.

    i think part of this is due to the change in training intensity, part is due to volume (inverse relationship with intensity) and part of it is due to extra caloric burn due to lower temps (your body burns calories to stay warm 24hrs a day when it is cooler).

    i have decided to just go with it. so what if i pack on 5-10lbs. i am making more power and going fast. could i be faster if i was on clen like the pros to drop weight? sure. but that wouldn't jive with my ethics and i don't get paid fat $$ to do this stuff. it is for fun! i don't want to walk around starving myself all the time. i don't think it is worth the added mental stress.
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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by whybotherme View Post
    i too struggle with weight gain this time of year.

    in the winter/spring i am super lean.

    i think part of this is due to the change in training intensity, part is due to volume (inverse relationship with intensity) and part of it is due to extra caloric burn due to lower temps (your body burns calories to stay warm 24hrs a day when it is cooler).
    Good point. In the spring/winter I am getting in long 3+ hour rides and 5+ hours on the weekends. During race time, if I race on Sunday, I typically don't want to put a long effort in on Saturday, and racing 1-2 hours on Sunday is a 60+% reduction time in effort. That is a lot of calories not spent training.

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