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  1. #1
    zrm
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    Want to loose weight fast

    OK folks,

    This year was the worst year in a long time for me in terms of seat time and fitness. In the past 3000 miles on my road bike and 2000 on my mtn bike per per five month season (I live at 9700 feet) where about the norm. This past season I got less than half of that.
    I now find myself about 12 lbs over my normal fighting weight and with ski season coming up (as in nordic and BC ) I want to get my fitness back.
    This is the first time I've ever put on this much extra weight and I'm wondering,, what are soon good techniques to drop weight fast without doing harm to myself. I know the obvious of fewer calories in and more out, but are there better ways of going at it than others?
    I should say I'm 46 and, well, maybe I need to accept to a certain extent that unless I want to train full time, which isn't realistic anymore, that I'm just going to be a little flabbyier and a lot slower, but I don't want to give into that just yet.

    Any secrets out there?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by zrm
    OK folks,

    This year was the worst year in a long time for me in terms of seat time and fitness. In the past 3000 miles on my road bike and 2000 on my mtn bike per per five month season (I live at 9700 feet) where about the norm. This past season I got less than half of that.
    I now find myself about 12 lbs over my normal fighting weight and with ski season coming up (as in nordic and BC ) I want to get my fitness back.
    This is the first time I've ever put on this much extra weight and I'm wondering,, what are soon good techniques to drop weight fast without doing harm to myself. I know the obvious of fewer calories in and more out, but are there better ways of going at it than others?
    I should say I'm 46 and, well, maybe I need to accept to a certain extent that unless I want to train full time, which isn't realistic anymore, that I'm just going to be a little flabbyier and a lot slower, but I don't want to give into that just yet.

    Any secrets out there?
    yep, eat less calories and eat frequently, and maybe talk to a sports nutritionist who has a vast experience in this, if anything they should give you more insight where to look, rather than listen to some dumb college kid from az who "might" be a trainer, just kidding, but noone can really diagnose a proper diet without knowing the variables that an RD will ask you to give.

  3. #3
    Jose Abraham
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    The best nutrition guide ever

    I've read a lot of book regarding nutrition. The best by far, Sports Nutrition for Endruance Athletes, by Monique Ryan.

    Read it and you'll know everything not only about loosing weight in a healthy way, but also about nutrition to kick butts in your races.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by pwrtrainer
    yep, eat less calories and eat frequently, and maybe talk to a sports nutritionist who has a vast experience in this, if anything they should give you more insight where to look, rather than listen to some dumb college kid from az who "might" be a trainer, just kidding, but noone can really diagnose a proper diet without knowing the variables that an RD will ask you to give.
    Excellent response! This type of question comes up all over the net and many respond that, what worked for them is the ONLY way to go, yet they have no experience in the field of dietetics. Opinions are like noses, no?

    To Zrm, find a genuine sports dietitian. If you live at 9,000 ft, it's likely that you are in a sports minded community and should not have too much trouble finding someone. Look for a genuine Sports DIETITIAN, not nutritionist. The labeel nutritionist means nothing, You probably know that 20 Big Macs per day will mak you fat...Poof! You are a nutritionist. Dietitian means 4 year B.S. in dietetics and almost a full year internship and possibly a master's or PhD..

    Be prepared before you meet or talk with this person. Have at LEAST a 3 day full account of of every single thing you put in your mouth composed of 2 weekdays and a weekend day. A 7 day is much better. document all of your deliberate activities like cycling or running. Maybe have an average of how many steps you take in a normal day via a pedometer. If you do this all by internet or phone (this poses issues) make sure you have hip, waist, theigh and arm measurements along with height and weight.

    That's all I can thing of right now. Good luck.

    Crockpot2001

  5. #5
    zrm
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    Yep, the reason I posted the question is to get as many different takes on the subject as possible. I'm interested in any nd all points of view.
    I should also point out that I'm hardly overweight by the standards of just being healthy, just by the standards of being an upper lever competitve cyclest or Nordic skier. I'm six foot tall and when I was around 6% BF I weighed 173, so I'm not a little guy. If I could get down to about 178-180 I think I'd be happy with that. My days of serious racing are most likely over but on the other hand, maybe that's what I need to motivate me. It's just my life right now doesn't permit me to put 20+ hours per week on my bike or at the Nordic center.

    Anyway, thanks for the responses!

  6. #6
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    I just wanted to add: lose weight as slow as you can. It actually takes more willpower and control to do it that way than losing weight fast.

    While I'm no expert, I can tell you that I've had two attempts to lose weight. The first attempt had me losing 2-3 lbs a week. And with it, I lost a lot of muscle and most of my endurance. My second attempt involved losing only 1 lb a week or less, which was a low enough loss to allow me to maintain and actually build on my fitness. My sport of choice wasn't biking during this, but I think it's still applicable.

    I'll let others with more experience confirm or deny this.

  7. #7
    Registered Dietitian
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crockpot2001
    The label nutritionist means nothing, You probably know that 20 Big Macs per day will mak you fat...Poof! You are a nutritionist. Dietitian means 4 year B.S. in dietetics and almost a full year internship and possibly a master's or PhD..


    Crockpot2001
    Thanks Crockpot-
    As someone finishing up his master's in nutrition and preparing for the dietetic internship next year, it's refreshing to hear someone give us credit Good advice.

    The advice to lose weight slowly is also very sound. 1-2 lbs/week is the most one can hope to lose while still maintaining muscle mass. Slower rates of weight loss also correlate with better success in keeping the pounds off.

    -Tommy
    Registered Dietitian, Cycling Coach, Ascend Nutrition and Coaching

    www.ascendthepeak.com

    www.facebook.com/ascendthepeak

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by tommyrod74
    Thanks Crockpot-
    As someone finishing up his master's in nutrition and preparing for the dietetic internship next year, it's refreshing to hear someone give us credit Good advice.

    -Tommy
    Where are you? I'm at the VA in St. Louis.

    I'm a fellow food cop. I keep it on the down-low for two reasons:

    1) Being an RD and owning a pickup truck are similar; once you are one or have one everyone's always calling you. Honestly, I don't mind it though.
    2) Over the internet I have been in more damned arguments over nutrition than I care for. Linus Pauling this, Atkins that. Sheez! I just wanna ride my 29er and help a brother out every once in a while.

  9. #9
    Registered Dietitian
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crockpot2001
    Where are you? I'm at the VA in St. Louis.

    I'm a fellow food cop. I keep it on the down-low for two reasons:

    1) Being an RD and owning a pickup truck are similar; once you are one or have one everyone's always calling you. Honestly, I don't mind it though.
    2) Over the internet I have been in more damned arguments over nutrition than I care for. Linus Pauling this, Atkins that. Sheez! I just wanna ride my 29er and help a brother out every once in a while.
    I'm in Greensboro, NC. Yes, I've gotten in arguments, too- I try to give helpful advice then butt out. Often people don't want advice- they want someone to tell them that what they're going to do anyway is all right.

    How do you like your job? I'm looking forward to having a steady (non-bike shop) income again...
    Registered Dietitian, Cycling Coach, Ascend Nutrition and Coaching

    www.ascendthepeak.com

    www.facebook.com/ascendthepeak

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by tommyrod74
    I'm in Greensboro, NC. Yes, I've gotten in arguments, too- I try to give helpful advice then butt out. Often people don't want advice- they want someone to tell them that what they're going to do anyway is all right.

    How do you like your job? I'm looking forward to having a steady (non-bike shop) income again...
    I'll PM you. Game on!

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by tommyrod74
    Thanks Crockpot-
    As someone finishing up his master's in nutrition and preparing for the dietetic internship next year, it's refreshing to hear someone give us credit Good advice.

    The advice to lose weight slowly is also very sound. 1-2 lbs/week is the most one can hope to lose while still maintaining muscle mass. Slower rates of weight loss also correlate with better success in keeping the pounds off.

    -Tommy

    i know this is a thread jack but could you pm me a link to some research on this correlation, ive stated it tons of times to my clients but they dont seem to get it. damn instant graticication society. thanks. oh yeah sorry for not claryfying in my original, i didnt mean to say nutritionist, i meand an RD, im shutting up now.

  12. #12
    Goathead Gladiator
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    100mg chromium pill each night after eating and 8 cups of green tea during the day. Go to the gymn and burn 1000calories on the eliptical after dinner each night. simple, works like a charm.
    Do Starbucks employees take coffee breaks?

  13. #13
    bikerbert
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    Try full body weight training

    Try combining pushing/pulling/rotating with squatting and lunging, and you'll blow the calories through the roof when you workout.

    You can also set a :30 clock when you exercise, and try to get as many reps in as you can. Only take about :45 in between each set, so you'll have to go lighter than usual.

    By putting on a little bit of muscle, your body will utilize more calories as you recover from riding/working out. I have a lot of my clients do this, and they drop the weight pretty quickly.

    Also, reduce your caloric intake by 500kcals each day. That will also help.

    Good Luck!
    Al

  14. #14
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    Efficacy of chromium.

    I know this thread is getting busy with different topics but I wanted to put in a few thoughts about chromium as I have recently conducted a meta-anaylsis on it in preperation for a study regarding its potential for use in diabetics.
    Chromium is a essential trace mineral for humans meaning your body cannot produce it so you must get it in your diet. Chromium is also an interesting substance because it is actually better absorbed through the digestive tract in the supplement form (Chromium Picolinate), than the form found in the food supply. This is the only substance I am aware of that this is the case. Its role as a weight loss supplement stems from its ability to potentiate insulin function, therby increasing the effectivness of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism.
    With regards to weight loss there have been several well controled studies published on this topic. Piller et al. Inter J Obesity (2003) 27:522-529 Published a meta-analysis of studies that were well controled (Double blind, Random, Placebo controlled) and used Body weight as a measure of effectiveness. 10 such studies have been condcuted. On average in these 10 studies people taking chromium lost <1 kg more then the control group over the course of 10 weeks. N=489. Thats .5 pounds lost in 10 weeks of use. What is the cost of a 10 week supply of chromium?
    My point in telling you all of this is that scientifc reasearch does not indicate that chromium is an effective supplement for Weight loss. The fact that its effects are small, stastically significent but small in terms of someone who is trying to lose 1 pound a week, and considering that there have been 0 long term studies of this substance in the doses that are taken in supplements. Unfortunatly with regards to weight loss there has yet to be a supplement that has proven effective and safe.

    Pwrtrainer,
    I have alot of data regarding speed of weight loss, and recidivism rates. I have just spent 20 minutes typing this reply so I need to get back to work, but if you want to PM me I can send you some data that I have found effective in convincing clients that there is really no hurry.

    Jerry Bowers
    MS, RD, CSCS
    Last edited by Pedalfaraway; 10-16-2006 at 10:51 AM.
    Visiting St george/Hurricane? Stay at my vacation rental. Discounts for MTB's

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  15. #15
    Goathead Gladiator
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    Hi Doc,

    Thanks for the cool long write-up. Not to nit-pick but 1kg = 2.2lb not 0.5lb as you wrote (I KNOW you're way better doing measurement with cc's ) and you asked about the cost of chromium - the answer is $7 gets me enough for 2 mths ( I buy a bottle of pills at Albertsons' here in LA ).
    And it works for me.


    pound.
    Quote Originally Posted by Pedalfaraway
    I know this thread is getting busy with different topics but I wanted to put in a few thoughts about chromium as I have recently conducted a meta-anaylsis on it in preperation for a study regarding its potential for use in diabetics.
    Chromium is a essential trace mineral for humans meaning your body cannot produce it so you must get it in your diet. Chromium is also an interesting substance because it is actually better absorbed through the digestive tract in the supplement form (Chromium Picolinate), than the form found in the food supply. This is the only substance I am aware of that this is the case. Its role as a weight loss supplement stems from its ability to potentiate insulin function, therby increasing the effectivness of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism.
    With regards to weight loss there have been several well controled studies published on this topic. Piller et al. Inter J Obesity (2003) 27:522-529 Published a meta-analysis of studies that were well controled (Double blind, Random, Placebo controlled) and used Body weight as a measure of effectiveness. 10 such studies have been condcuted. On average in these 10 studies people taking chromium lost 1 kg more then the control group over the course of 10 weeks. N=489. Thats .5 pounds lost in 10 weeks of use. What is the cost of a 10 week supply of chromium?
    My point in telling you all of this is that scientifc reasearch does not indicate that chromium is an effective supplement for Weight loss. The fact that its effects are small, stastically significent but small in terms of someone who is trying to lose 1 pound a week, and considering that there have been 0 long term studies of this substance in the doses that are taken in supplements. Unfortunatly with regards to weight loss there has yet to be a supplement that has proven effective and safe.

    Pwrtrainer,
    I have alot of data regarding speed of weight loss, and recidivism rates. I have just spent 20 minutes typing this reply so I need to get back to work, but if you want to PM me I can send you some data that I have found effective in convincing clients that there is really no hurry.

    Jerry Bowers
    MS, RD, CSCS
    Do Starbucks employees take coffee breaks?

  16. #16
    zrm
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    Maybe I shouldn't have added "fast" to the end of the thread title. If I could loose 10 pounds of BF by mid January, I'd be happy and be fit enough for the Nordic races that I want to do this winter.
    I'm not really interested in suppliments. I've tried to avoid them throughout my athletic "carreer" and just eat a good balanced diet maybe heavier on carbs during intensive periods. Mostly I was looking for tips in type of diet composition, (IE fat, carb, protien ratios) timing of meals and types of workouts, that sort of thing. I'm aware that I won't be doing myself any favors by starving myself and loosing lot's of musle mass, besids, I [I]like[I] to eat (maybe that's the problem)
    I did just renew my membership to the gym. Usually, I only spend time in the gym during the winter. Mostly because I've always figured that (1) In the past, the nature of my job has provided plenty of upper body workout and (2) Longer days in the warm months mean plenty of seat time. and (3) I've always figured that I need the weight lifting time in the winter to prevent ski injury and it's not as big a priority for cycling.

    Siince my job is putting me in the office more these days maybe I should be putting in time in the gym year round now that I'm on the down hill slide to 50?

  17. #17
    Learnin to race!
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    I agree that nutrition is a huge part of getting and or staying fit but no one has mentioned the exercise aspect. Obviously zrm you are in shape but eating right alone will not get your weight down. You have to continue to get your cardio in. My best experiences have come when I cross train. Granted I am no trainer and I am certainly not a nutritionist (How cool would it be if I was though, hmm career change!) but it seems to me that there are two parts to the solution. Anyways, good luck with it and when you find the winning solution let us know.

    Andy
    Cuts and bruises are badges of honor.

  18. #18
    inner peace to make peace
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    run (sweat) often.
    eat less calories and eat frequently high quality calories: whole grains, organic produce and meats with moderate amount of free-range protein and "good" fat (canola oil, olive oil, grapeseed oil, cold-water wild fish) intake. avoid sugars or processed foods and 'bad" fats (corn oil, butter, margarine, grain-fed and factory raised cattle/pig/chicken/eggs/milk)

    easy to say hard to do
    “Everyday is a good day,” from the Blue Cliff Records, Yun-men (864-949 AD).

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by zrm
    OK folks,

    This year was the worst year in a long time for me in terms of seat time and fitness. In the past 3000 miles on my road bike and 2000 on my mtn bike per per five month season (I live at 9700 feet) where about the norm. This past season I got less than half of that.
    I now find myself about 12 lbs over my normal fighting weight and with ski season coming up (as in nordic and BC ) I want to get my fitness back.
    This is the first time I've ever put on this much extra weight and I'm wondering,, what are soon good techniques to drop weight fast without doing harm to myself. I know the obvious of fewer calories in and more out, but are there better ways of going at it than others?
    I should say I'm 46 and, well, maybe I need to accept to a certain extent that unless I want to train full time, which isn't realistic anymore, that I'm just going to be a little flabbyier and a lot slower, but I don't want to give into that just yet.

    Any secrets out there?
    Cut out the crap food.
    Reeses, candy, soda, french fries, cake, ice cream, alchohol

    Ironically, I've found it very hard to actually eat enough to support effective training and recovery. It's all comsuming to plan out eating depending on when I'm riding, and to eat at good intervals after races/hard training to recover. And to eat properly when on the bike.

  20. #20
    Queenslander
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    without a doubt the easiest way to do it is to do a carb cutoff diet. at some point of the day only take in trace amounts of carbs and add some good fats like fish oil or olive oil. Easy way to do it is not to eat carbs after dark (green veg excepted). it takes a little bit of dicipline but u feel fine and the fat comes off relatively easily while preserving muscle.

    piece of cake...
    Doin' it for the love - Palauan Style

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