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  1. #1
    Superflying on Haven
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    The ultimate indoor winter trainer (xpost)

    I used to ride a Schwinn spinning bike and run treadmill during winter to keep in shape but I've found that Louis Garneau spinning bike that tilts from side to side. It's quiet double belt driven, magnetic resistance, 100% adjustable. I removed the original handlebars to set up my own mtb bars. It's VERY cool, it really feels like I'm riding a real bike and It replicates perfectly the position I have outdoor
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails The ultimate indoor winter trainer (xpost)-136-3666_img.jpg  

    The ultimate indoor winter trainer (xpost)-136-3667_img.jpg  

    The ultimate indoor winter trainer (xpost)-136-3668_img.jpg  


  2. #2
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    Nice setup. Spin bike is nice too!

  3. #3
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    Do all spin bikes tilt side to side like that ?

  4. #4
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    Where did you find this bike and how much did it cost? Can't seem to find it on their web stie.
    CyclingCentralVa.org

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by DavidR1
    Where did you find this bike and how much did it cost? Can't seem to find it on their web stie.
    I found this from a news station in PA - these are called "Real Ryders"

    http://abclocal.go.com/wpvi/story?se...medium=twitter

  6. #6
    Superflying on Haven
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    The one I own is discontinued since 2003... that's why I'm glad I found a used one for $400. There is a shop, here in Canada, that still sell them for $1555 US. Here is the link http://www.brauns.com/gc/gc_item.exe?K=LGVENTOUXEXEBIKE

    Otherwise, in the USA, check for BODYCRAFT TOUR TRAINER on Google. There is one now on Ebay http://shop.ebay.com/i.html?_nkw=bod....c0.m270.l1313

    It is basically the same bike without magnetic resistance and with a road style handlebar. From what I've seen they cost $1299 to $1399
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by DavidR1
    Where did you find this bike and how much did it cost? Can't seem to find it on their web stie.
    I found this from a news station in PA - these are called "Real Ryders"

    http://abclocal.go.com/wpvi/story?se...medium=twitter

  8. #8
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    Another option would be some emotion rollers and some slick tires.

    www.insideride.com

    A bit less expensive and even more like actually riding outside because you're actually on your bike.

    Cheers!

  9. #9
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    I've considered buying one of these rollers few years ago but after I've been witnessing a hard crash of a friend doing a demonstration ... I changed my mind. These rollers are freaking dangerous if you lose your concentration for a millisecond and you fall off. It's like riding a bike on a tighrtope...

  10. #10
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    So, you've never actually tried them? You based your decision on someone else falling off of them? No offense, but if you're friend crashed that hard on them he/she was trying to do something really stupid on them. They are pretty easy to stand and sprint and even to sit up no handed (with a little practice that is).

    They're really not that dangerous. You'd have to space out for quite a lot longer than a millisecond, more like a few seconds. After all, there are bumpers on the front roller to let you know when the front wheel is at the edge.

    Bottom line, if you want to feel like you're actually riding a bicycle indoors, these are closest you'll get to that. I guess that includes some of the same risks of falling off.

    Why? Because you are actually riding YOUR bicycle and it can move naturally (forward, backward and side to side) underneath you.

    Cheers!

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Menzo
    I've considered buying one of these rollers few years ago but after I've been witnessing a hard crash of a friend doing a demonstration ... I changed my mind. These rollers are freaking dangerous if you lose your concentration for a millisecond and you fall off. It's like riding a bike on a tighrtope...
    rollers look pretty tame compared to xc racing...

  12. #12
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    get to know me thru my blog
    http://oilcanracer.blogspot.com/

    spend $$ at my sponsors shop http://www.revolutionutah.com/

  13. #13
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    Do you have to use a cruiser style tire on rollers, or will the knobbies work ok?

  14. #14
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    Stay away from knobbies on the rollers! They are loud and you'll shred them in no time at all!

    I ride my road bike on the rollers stricktly, just find it to be quiter and more comfortable.

    As for the rollers being dangerous? You need to bail off them at least once to understand how to do it. Once you get this, you stop pedalling as soon as you come off and everything is fine. If you are still concerned about this, maybe it's time to find a new hobby? I've crashed much worse in the woods than I think is possble on the rollers!

  15. #15
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    my 55 year old wife picked riding rollers on her FR bike(knobbies and full squishy) in minutes(in a doorway), we switched to slicks on my old Enduro and by her 3rd session she was riding without support for as long as she could pedal.
    Also to help those who arent sure about roller, there are parabolic shaped rollers that herd you to the center by design so its not that tough or dangerous.
    We've been told you cant ride suspension bikes because of the wheelbase change..maybe not a Jedi but otherwise BS
    We were also pretty much told by the LBS(Performance Cycle) that most folks just cant get the hang of it and everyone takes a long time to to get it figured out if they ever do.
    Again, I say BS...same with the danger...riding off the rollers is a non event unless you loose your balance..which happens to some people just standing over their bikes
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by crossup
    my 55 year old wife picked riding rollers on her FR bike(knobbies and full squishy) in minutes(in a doorway), we switched to slicks on my old Enduro and by her 3rd session she was riding without support for as long as she could pedal.
    Also to help those who arent sure about roller, there are parabolic shaped rollers that herd you to the center by design so its not that tough or dangerous.
    We've been told you cant ride suspension bikes because of the wheelbase change..maybe not a Jedi but otherwise BS
    We were also pretty much told by the LBS(Performance Cycle) that most folks just cant get the hang of it and everyone takes a long time to to get it figured out if they ever do.
    Again, I say BS...same with the danger...riding off the rollers is a non event unless you loose your balance..which happens to some people just standing over their bikes
    Agreed.

    I've been using rollers since 2003, and never had a problem. Today I did 2 hours on them, and they're great. I think the biggest advantage of them are (I'm going to put this in caps):

    175 WATTS ON ROLLERS, FEELS LIKE 175 WATTS OUTSIDE.

    It's something about the smooth-even pedaling resistance of rollers, the inherent flywheel affect of the wheels, and maybe combined with the act of balance. I don't know. But they just feel great and since the PE is not so torturous, you get the proper load on your legs for training.

    My Minoura Rim-lock trainer collected so much dust, I just sold it. 175W on that thing felt like HELL. So I never got the proper load on my legs and hated using the thing.

    Plus with rollers, you can do all this cool stuff (this guy is way better than me):
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MiCdm5FsJpg
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