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  1. #1
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    Training with weight vest/ankle weights?

    I am a former football player and we used to do alot of training with weight vests, ankle weights and other sort of resistance training. Once you took off the weight vest you felt so strong and light.

    Anyone ever do any training like this on the bike? I was thinking just base miles on the road?

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    Why not just ride faster?
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    The difference with a bike is that you have gears.

    If you want more resistance, click the gear up. Can't do that with your legs for running, hence the weighted vest and such.

    Remember over-speed drills running? (Or downhill running). It also exist on the bike. It's called spin ups and you click to an easier gear.
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    There was a thread a while ago that talked about this (I'm not trying to be one of those 'use the search function' guys). It seems that the consensus was that it was of little to no benefit. The added weight would only cause you to ride slower.
    "Donuts. Is there anything they can't do?"

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    Hmm...what if I am running a 1x10(34x12/36)? Makes sense that having the extra weight in the pack(I put 5lbs in) would make me stronger or faster uphill without. No? Very curious. Since I've been doing this, my road climbing has gotten much better.
    I am immune to your disdain.

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    Quote Originally Posted by indyfab25
    Since I've been doing this, my road climbing has gotten much better.
    So I'm guessing that you started adding the weight at the same time that you began focusing on your climbing?

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    No. I just threw it in this winter. No concentrated climbing just yet. Yet...
    I am immune to your disdain.

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    Quote Originally Posted by indyfab25
    No. I just threw it in this winter. No concentrated climbing just yet. Yet...
    Then why did you put extra weight in your pack? Obviously, you did it for a reason. So it's no big surprise that your climbing would improve, not because the work performed lifting 5 pounds of rocks is magically better than work performed lifting your body and bike weight, but because the act/decision to add the weight changed your behavior.

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    I'm throwing 5 more lbs in my Ergon for mountain rides soon.
    I am immune to your disdain.

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    Quote Originally Posted by flargle
    Then why did you put extra weight in your pack? Obviously, you did it for a reason. So it's no big surprise that your climbing would improve, not because the work performed lifting 5 pounds of rocks is magically better than work performed lifting your body and bike weight, but because the act/decision to add the weight changed your behavior.
    I threw the weight in to increase strength climbing. I figure adding some will make it easier to rip when I have 20 less pounds on my back.
    I sense you are projecting/assuming a lot. I am riding as I normally do. What behavior has changed?
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  11. #11
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    Adding weight to the bike as opposed to the rider is usually better because then you don't have the discomfort of wearing ankle weights or a hot weight vest whilst cycling.

    One popular way to add weight for training is to use a heavy winter bike with heavy tyres and wheels so that when you switch to your lightweight wheels and race bike it feels as though you get an instant boost.

    On the road you'd use something like Schwalbe Marathon Plus tyres which in a 700x28c size weigh 740g a tyre, compared to 195g a tyre for a 700x23c Schwalbe Ultremo ZX, adding 1090g to the weight of your bike.

    http://www.schwalbe.co.uk/c2-1071-sc...thon-plus.html

    http://www.schwalbe.co.uk/c2-1294-sc...ltremo-zx.html

    Another way to add weight for training is by putting lead weights in your water bottles or even in the frame.

    http://www.cptips.com/trntips.htm

    .

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    Quote Originally Posted by indyfab25
    I threw the weight in to increase strength climbing. [...] I am riding as I normally do.
    This is a contradiction. If you're adding weights to improve your climbing, then you are going to add effort to your climbs.

    But it's all about watts. Whether they come from using a heavier gear, or putting rocks in your pockets, they're the same to your legs.

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    Quote Originally Posted by flargle
    This is a contradiction. If you're adding weights to improve your climbing, then you are going to add effort to your climbs.

    But it's all about watts. Whether they come from using a heavier gear, or putting rocks in your pockets, they're the same to your legs.


    So losing weight on your body does not matter, in other words? What is the difference? Why would throwing 5lbs in my pack not increase power?
    I am immune to your disdain.

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    Quote Originally Posted by WR304
    Adding weight to the bike as opposed to the rider is usually better because then you don't have the discomfort of wearing ankle weights or a hot weight vest whilst cycling.

    One popular way to add weight for training is to use a heavy winter bike with heavy tyres and wheels so that when you switch to your lightweight wheels and race bike it feels as though you get an instant boost.

    On the road you'd use something like Schwalbe Marathon Plus tyres which in a 700x28c size weigh 740g a tyre, compared to 195g a tyre for a 700x23c Schwalbe Ultremo ZX, adding 1090g to the weight of your bike.

    http://www.schwalbe.co.uk/c2-1071-sc...thon-plus.html

    http://www.schwalbe.co.uk/c2-1294-sc...ltremo-zx.html

    Another way to add weight for training is by putting lead weights in your water bottles or even in the frame.

    http://www.cptips.com/trntips.htm

    .
    With the Ergon, the weight just disappears. Going from 1100g studded tires to a 650g tire sure as hell makes you feel like a hero for sure.
    I am immune to your disdain.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by indyfab25
    Why would throwing 5lbs in my pack not increase power?
    Because you don't have some sort of internal regulator controlling your speed. If you kept your speed 100% constant pre- and post-rocks, then you'd be working at a higher rate (i.e. increasing power) proportional to how much extra weight you're carrying uphill. But you could much more easily shift to a smaller cog for the same training effect.

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    Quote Originally Posted by flargle
    Because you don't have some sort of internal regulator controlling your speed. If you kept your speed 100% constant pre- and post-rocks, then you'd be working at a higher rate (i.e. increasing power) proportional to how much extra weight you're carrying uphill. But you could much more easily shift to a smaller cog for the same training effect.
    Speed has remained constant.

    There is no way to use a lower gear on some of the hills around here and I would like to shift as I normally would. So what you are saying is there is no benefit to adding 5lbs of weight across the gear range? Take switching to a smaller gear out of the picture for a moment.
    I am immune to your disdain.

  17. #17
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    More weight means you get tired faster.

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    Holy smokes someone please take over for me.

  19. #19
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    This has already been discussed at length...

    on RBR. The general consensus is that you can do the same by:

    Gearing UP (sorry...wrote down)
    and
    Riding faster

    Same affect..

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by rydbyk
    on RBR. The general consensus is that you can do the same by:

    Gearing down
    and
    Riding faster

    Same affect..
    Thank you.
    I am immune to your disdain.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by flargle
    Holy smokes someone please take over for me.
    Sorry man...just trying to wrap my head around it.
    I am immune to your disdain.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by indyfab25
    Thank you.

    Sorry...meant Gear UP...not down..oops

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    Quote Originally Posted by indyfab25
    Sorry man...just trying to wrap my head around it.
    Just remember, power = force x velocity.

    On a steep hill, most of your force is applied against gravity; air resistance is negligible because of the low speed, and rolling resistance depends on how chunky the terrain is.

    Whether you increase your power by adding weight (i.e. force) or by increasing velocity (i.e. changing your gear or increasing cadence), it's all the same to your legs.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by flargle
    Holy smokes someone please take over for me.

    i will. plain and simple, you are partly wrong.

    adding weight to the bike or to the body will force you to use different muscles depending on where the weight is. generally(every ones body and riding style is different) the lower the added weight the more you will feel it in your arms/back if standing. if seated the legs.

    the higher the weight, the more you will feel it in your back/core section if seated. and in the legs if standing.
    this has to do with shifting the body around the bike to make forward movement/progression. after a while your body will respond to stimulus and you will go back to using the same muscles that you used before adding weight. normalization has taken place and you have become stronger.


    adding weight will tax your body/heartrate more or less the same as gearing harder. how much weight is arguable and individual compared to one gear up. watts/heartrate can give you a closer idea for that.

    adding weights to the legs or feet will exaggerate your pedaling spin and give you bad habits. better to add weight to a non moving part of the body or bike. i like to use heavy training wheels. like mentioned, when you go to your race wheels, the feeling is quite superman like.
    Out riding, leave a message

  25. #25
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    It could work, you lot of missing out a possible scenario!!

    If he rides with others at there pace, or just rides at a comfortable speed and can't push himself to just ride faster, then adding rocks and maintaining the same comfortable speed would mean he's pushing himself harder, so therefore upon removing the rocks this might increase his riding speed as he's putting out the same watts for a while.

    Be warned, this likely is for a while unless you like the new speed and keep pushing yourself ofcourse, if you don't you'll drop back again.

    Or he might remove the rocks and go back to slacking ofcourse.

  26. #26
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    Wind resistence always matters regardless of speed. Someone said it doesn't during climbing. I train on ski hills and, despite going slow, any wind will require more effort to get up the hill. I dread climbing repeats when there is wind.

  27. #27
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    Slap on a cheap 28/38/48 Crankset.
    =P

  28. #28
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    regarding your core and lower back: if you ride with a camelback and it's packed with junk, your lower back and core strength will increase rapidly. i used to commute on a trail and had to carry food, a lock, water, clothes, and toiletries in my camelback. based on my experience, i made gains in lower back and core strength that i might not have otherwise made. (i wasn't working out with weights, mind you.)

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    Thanks for all the feedback. I will be honest I don't understand all the physics of it, but a few comments out there about "feeling like superman" and training with a heavier bike make all the sense in the world to me. During races isn't feeling good a big part of the mental approach to it? I know when I hit the first hill and people start falling back and I feel strong it gives me confidence in the race and I tend to perform better.
    Mental thing maybe? But I think I'm going to give it a try.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Novice
    Thanks for all the feedback. I will be honest I don't understand all the physics of it, but a few comments out there about "feeling like superman" and training with a heavier bike make all the sense in the world to me. During races isn't feeling good a big part of the mental approach to it? I know when I hit the first hill and people start falling back and I feel strong it gives me confidence in the race and I tend to perform better.
    Mental thing maybe? But I think I'm going to give it a try.
    As long as you don't spend money $$$, it's okay.

    If you're spending money, clicking it one gear higher and going a bit faster is much, much cheaper.

    BTW, I just came home from a hammerfest ride with a bunch of Cat 2 and 3 roadies (I'm still coughing my stretched out lungs as I type this). That will make you faster than adding any weight; OMG, it was so damn hard. I had to skip my rotation to pull several times.
    Last edited by Poncharelli; 03-22-2011 at 09:20 PM.
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    Ride a steeper hill in bigger gears.

    Personally i think having weights tied or wrapped around you is enough of a demotivator....the second you get hot and tired you'll want to take them off.

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    What if you are on a single speed?

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by sbsbiker
    What if you are on a single speed?



    Run a harder gear.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AZ.MTNS
    Run a harder gear.
    What if that is your preferred gear or the gear best suited for the terrain?
    I am immune to your disdain.

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    This is a silly argument and it seems odd that it keeps getting it repeated. Until this guy is climbing every hill in his hardest gear and spinning out b/c its too easy and he's still at a pseudo resting heart rate, adding those weights is a waste.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by indyfab25
    What if that is your preferred gear or the gear best suited for the terrain?

    Push the same gear harder.

  37. #37
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    Same discussion, different board.

    http://forums.roadbikereview.com/sho...wpost&t=244363

  38. #38
    mnoutain bkie rdier
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    Quote Originally Posted by AZ.MTNS
    Push the same gear harder.

    Or, as NINER says, "pedal dammit!"

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    I see where it could provide some advantage....if you were doing hill repeats close by your house just trying to get a better workout for the limited distance.

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    get a trailer and pull kids around in it...

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Combatcm
    I see where it could provide some advantage....if you were doing hill repeats close by your house just trying to get a better workout for the limited distance.
    no advantage... you'd just be going up the hill at slower pace

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    Well, weights are out and I am throwing a 36t chainring up front. I'll train with that and race with whatever suits the terrain.
    I am immune to your disdain.

  43. #43
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    Just to clarify: it's not that the weights are bad per se, but they don't give you any special or additional training effect above and beyond just riding hard.

  44. #44
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    Pushing a harder gear makes more sense. Why have the extra weight ripping into corners, ripping dh, and messing with sag etc?
    I am immune to your disdain.

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by indyfab25
    Pushing a harder gear makes more sense. Why have the extra weight ripping into corners, ripping dh, and messing with sag etc?
    Fair nuff.

  46. #46
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    I've got extra weight I am losing right now as well. My power to weight ratio will be improving slowly here over the next couple months.
    I am immune to your disdain.

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by noah19692000
    no advantage... you'd just be going up the hill at slower pace
    That's the point

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