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  1. #1
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    Training on the road with a 26" hardtail MTB

    I ride a 2013 camber comp carbon and have a 2006 giant xtc team. I don't have a road bike or any extra cash for one. I've being told to help my endurance and fitness I need to rack up some serious miles. I'm just curious what I'm missing or lacking by doing my road riding on a moutain bike instead of a road bike
    Thanks

  2. #2
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    Efficiency...

    Which in this context is not desired. You want resistance/load to keep your power up as well as your endurance form(aka pedaling rpm) which both happen more consistently on the road. Besides, if your are going to compete in one form or another you will be well to stay in that form for muscle memory and balance. If the feel is too draggy or noisy due to mud tread, change to a more solid tread pattern for the road work. Unless you are out to get there fastest possible there is no real need to have a dedicated road rig just to work out on.
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    Quote Originally Posted by supersedona View Post
    ... change to a more solid tread pattern for the road work.
    I love to ride these on long road rides. I inflate them to 45 lbs, which keeps me up on that center bead on pavement, and then if i find myself off road for a few miles, I get by. They are dirt cheap too so i don't have to worry about burning them up on pavement. but they're really heavy.
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  4. #4
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    Training on the road with a 26" hardtail MTB

    Quote Originally Posted by supersedona View Post
    Efficiency...

    Which in this context is not desired. You want resistance/load to keep your power up as well as your endurance form(aka pedaling rpm) which both happen more consistently on the road. Besides, if your are going to compete in one form or another you will be well to stay in that form for muscle memory and balance. If the feel is too draggy or noisy due to mud tread, change to a more solid tread pattern for the road work. Unless you are out to get there fastest possible there is no real need to have a dedicated road rig just to work out on.
    Thanks for the info!
    I'm going to be doing a 50 mile MTB race in late September. The Vermont50 and I was to get my Clydesdale butt in the right shape not to only finish but also do it in a respectable amount of time.
    One other question. Average speed on a mountain bike on the road is going to be lower than a road bike I would guess. I do about a 14.5 to 15.5 mph average with about 350ft of elevation per hour am I dogging it? Or can I squeeze more out of my ride?
    Should I be doing more to build endurance and strength and prepare for 50 miles than 60+ road miles and 20+MTB miles a week?

  5. #5
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    14-18 would be about average for a good pace. Depending on the tires it can affect your top speed output/drag ratio. 50-60 road miles plus 20 is not out of the question, but as with any venture, don't be afraid to try it and make adjustments along the way.
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    Training on the road with a 26" hardtail MTB

    2.1Hutchinson out front and a 2.0 sworks something or other out back.. I don't mind the tires if I get into shoulder sand or have to hop the curb or hit a monster New England pot hole they keeps me and the wheels still rolling and rubber side down.. : )

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    I train on the road loads using my 26" mtb. Use whatever tires are on at the time, find the buzz quite therapeutic sometimes.
    Actually a lot more comfy than a road bike and you don't have to worry about every pothole like they do.
    I've done some group rides too and as long as you stay in the pack the extra wind resistance is not a problem.
    Even did a 10 mile TT the other day. Averaged 21.4mph with 1x9 gearing (lots of high cadence work!)
    Otherwise 14-15mph is cool. Road work is often about long steady distance, so take some snacks and go out for a few hours at a pleasant pace and enjoy the scenery. Do that twice a week and you'll feel great.

  8. #8
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    I have road bike in addition to my mtn bike. However I did that because I wanted to. There not wrong with using mtn bike on the road other than efficiency. My road bike is just much more efficient. Faster to accelerate and better in the wind and will fly up climbs. However a mtn bike will do the same, just a bit slower. If you are just training then does it make a difference? The only difference is fun factor. I enjoy the road bike on the road much more than mtn bike.
    Joe
    2003 KHS Alite 4000 26" Hardtail - XC, All mountain, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

  9. #9
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    Grawp, my road bike is comfortable and I don't have to worry about every pot hole. I just bunny hop them or go around them. I just wanted to dispel those myths. Anyways, if you're out there solo on the mtb, it will work fine on the road. 3 hours of work is 3 hours of work and it doesn't matter what bike you're on. You could get farther on a road bike, but as long as you put in the effort, don't worry about it. Just don't show up for a group ride on your mtb unless you're crazy fast or it's a B or C group.

    Another option would be to ride fire roads if you have those nearby. Good luck to you.
    There is not much choice between rotten apples.

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    Thanks for all the replys!
    Im going to continue to ride my 26" and log all those much needed training miles.

    What do you folks think of zone training with a HRM? Is it hype or worth the money and the time?

    thanks

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ksousa81 View Post
    Thanks for all the replys!
    Im going to continue to ride my 26" and log all those much needed training miles.

    What do you folks think of zone training with a HRM? Is it hype or worth the money and the time?

    thanks
    I believe training in HR zones is very effective for gaining fitness and targetting areas of improvement. If you plan to keep racing and training with emphasis on improvement, I'd recommend purchasing a HR monitor and the book The Cyclists Training Bible by Joel Friel. I picked mine up on Amazon used, for cheap. Hope this helps.

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