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  1. #1
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    Training Plan for MTB racing AND Tris

    Here is a copy of a post I did in trainingpeaks forums, but thought I'd x post here. Any thoughts. Some of the coaching packages for custom training plans are crazy expensive and usually only cover 12 weeks. Too rich for my blood, but just looking for some feedback here. I usually use Friel but I think my racing is getting too complex for that (with the Xterras and Tris). At least too complex for me to put together. Also was owned in the Expert category and that wont happen again. Need to redeem myself.


    I did 15 mountain bike races last year, one Xterra, and four triathlons (sprint). Yes, I was busy.

    Mountain Biking is my primary sport, but will continue to do TRI's, with my first Olympic TRI next season. This past year I really focused on my swimming and running and my mountain biking suffered. How can I balance these different race formats?

    I was thinking about using the ATP in Training Peaks for my mountain biking and then just do some swimming and running on the side.

    Another thing. I did two 6 hour mountain bike races.

    What's the best approach to getting a solid training plan? Some of the prices from the coaches get pretty expensive. d

  2. #2
    AZ
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    IMHO , your training goals need to be more focused . Each disipline is specialized and trying to train for each of them dilutes the training program . Focus on the disipline which is of primary importance .

  3. #3
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    That is the way I'm leaning. My focus in MTBing, especially after this past season and embarrasing myself in Expert.

    I am very competitive in the biking during TRI's and not so bad in the swim. Running is a whole different story.

  4. #4
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    I would agree with AZ.about focus. I know from experience racing Cat. 1 mtn bikes this year, if you want to be fast and competitive it needs to be the primary. You will be hard pressed to excel at less than 8-12 of well structured training. Now throw in tris, Xterras and Ultra endurance is just asking for a massive case of burnout! If you just want to pin a number on and "Hang out" with a bunch of racers and have a good time, then lower your expectations and have fun.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by n8rhino
    I would agree with AZ.about focus. I know from experience racing Cat. 1 mtn bikes this year, if you want to be fast and competitive it needs to be the primary. You will be hard pressed to excel at less than 8-12 of well structured training. Now throw in tris, Xterras and Ultra endurance is just asking for a massive case of burnout! If you just want to pin a number on and "Hang out" with a bunch of racers and have a good time, then lower your expectations and have fun.
    I need to kill at MTB racing next year so I'll focus on that. Xterra, Tri's and Endurance are just for fun, challenge.

  6. #6
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    I have a very simple training plan for you:

    If you ran yesterday, ride today. If you rode yesterday, run today. If it's a work day, do it for an hour. If it's a weekend, do it for 2 hours (running) or 4 hours (riding). Don't shy away from hills.

    Two months before your triathlon, swim 30 minutes twice a week. One month before, up it to 45 minutes three times a week. If you want a fancy interval workout, do 20 x 100 on a fixed interval.

    Also two months before your target race, replace the long weekend run with a tough brick.

    When you need a day off, take a day off. The longer your target race is, the longer you need to taper.

    The key to success is consistency and avoiding injury. There are also two important training concepts: specificity and generality. Specificity means that doing pushups and pullups and burpees won't do crap for your performance in a mountain bike race. Generality means that riding hard for an hour or two will have basically the same adaptive effect whether you structure it as 2x20, 4x10, or "ride as you feel", if you push yourself according to your central governor.

  7. #7
    BDT
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    I also do tris / xterra / MTB racing. I'm pretty casual about training and would probably fall into that pin a number and have a good time crowd, but did a few things last year that got me much faster. I joined a local masters swimming program. Swimming with the group and getting a few stroke tips from a coach was very helpful. Since the group met at 6am 3x a week, I could get my swimming out of the way. I also found a guy that was a track coach and traded bike skills training for running training. He made me a much faster runner by a). teaching me how to run proper intervals b). proper breathing c). yelling expletives at me when I wasn't going fast enough. One other thing I did that might have helped was running a little every time I got off the bike. Even if it was only 400m it got my legs used to the transition.

    After looking to your website, these ideas probably aren't new to you. You could probably give me a few tips.

    FYI - If you are fast on a bike and want to feel like a bad ass. Enter an xterra race. You will blow past about 90% of the field on the bike portion. It's like Mario Cart.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BDT
    FYI - If you are fast on a bike and want to feel like a bad ass. Enter an xterra race. You will blow past about 90% of the field on the bike portion. It's like Mario Cart.
    If you are a slow swimmer, you don't even get to see the guys that swim and ride faster than you.

    I don't know what Xterras you've done, but the ones I've done have plenty of strong mountain bikers. Plenty of weak ones too, but plenty of strong ones.

  9. #9
    BDT
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    Average Cat2 MTB racer = Top 10% Xterra bike portion in the 5 races I've done. It seems like many xterra folks have more of a roadie / tri background and have trouble with the more technical (for xterra) courses. I also feel this way because I exit the water mid-pack and have half the field in front of me to pass.

    Don't get me wrong, the pro's and age group winners are super strong mtb bikers. But once you get past the elite group you have steep drop off.

  10. #10
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    Race with a HR Monitor?

    Good day,

    I am new to this forum so forgive me if this has been asked before. Do people usually race with a heart rate monitor or leave them at home. I am conflicted between the two. When I race, I usually place in the top 25% for my group. There are a few ahead of me that are significantly faster (tier 1 of my group). Often when I try to hang with the tier 1 guys I sometimes get excited/adrenaline and redline over the climbs. This leaves me feeling week for a few minutes after the climb and therefor slower. Note I am weight training and planning a winter of alternating long rides to drop fat, and intervals to build top end speed and climbing. I was thinking that if I used my HR monitor I would know to back off a bit. On the other-hand, do I want to back off?

    Your input would be welcomed and appreciated.

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