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  1. #1
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    Training with mtb shoes & pedals on road bike for base miles and spring races?

    Lots of good sale prices on road shoes and pedals. I currently wear Specialized Pro mtb shoes with a great stiff carbon sole and they fit so great. Pedals are eggbeaters. I swap these over to my road since multiple days are spent riding. No hot spots, but my rides are not over 3 hours. Yet.

    Would I see any benefit going to a traditional road shoe and pedal? Obviously it's extra cost which I can afford, but don't want to "waste" money if all I'm doing is losing some weight from the shoes.

    Will the larger pedal platform be useful? I do plan to race a handful of spring series road events. Other than showing up with hairy legs and mtb shoes/pedals on a road bike I'm wondering if things are good to go as-is.

  2. #2
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    I have both road and mountain setups. There's a few differences that are mostly just luxuries:
    -Better pedal shoe connection; especially with speedplay zeros. I currently run ultregra pedals which are okay.
    -LIghter weight. I currently have the Sworks road shoes which are stupid light, but also stupid expensive.

    I think the biggest physical issue will be crank length and Qfactor differences, which most times can't be eliminated regardless of shoe setup.

    Also, if considering a road shoe, go specialized again since they have the foot angle tilt design. Especially if it works well for you. I have Shimano MTB shoes and notice the tilt difference every time I change shoes. When the Sworks wear out, I'll probably go full Shimano per the sponsoring shop.

    I have a riding friend who was one of the best climbers in the state (road racer). He used SIDI mtb shoes and SPDs even though he's never raced a single MTB race. He just wanted to have them for MTB recreational use while saving some money.
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  3. #3
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    i use the mtb pedals and shoes in the winter as they are warmer and my speedplays clog with snow. MTB shoe-pedal is a little annoying on the road because there is some extra play and rattle but for normal training they are just fine

  4. #4
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    You could just get some eggbeater pedals for the road bike and be done. I doubt road riders will be offended by that. But it is always good to have more than one bike shoe.

    I have Eggbeaters on all my bikes and 4 mountain bike shoes (for all occasions and weather). I used the shims that come with the shoe-pedal interface to make sure there is no rattle and it works for me.
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  5. #5
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    I was a bit nervous at first using my CB EBs with Mavic Razor MTB shoes in our summer crit series (here in Oz it's just going on summer). But after a few podium finishes from sprints I am amazed I haven't pulled a shoe. But I do use a plastic pipe wired over the ends of the pedals to take up the slack.

    Bottom line, I wouldn't bother with roadie shoes/pedals...

    BTW my roadie is an Aluminium TCR

  6. #6
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    I used carbon soled pearl izumi mt shoes and spd mt pedals on my road bike for 1 season then finally went to a normal shimano road shoe and 105 pedals-I like the wider platform and feel of the road pedals/shoes better than using mt shoes.
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  7. #7
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    The only issue with mountain pedals is the thickness. Most road pedals do not have much meterial under the spindal which helps for clearance when pedaling thru corners. For most training rides you are fine in MTB shoes and pedals. A lot of the guys from my race team train on the road in the same shoes and pedals. I have road and mountain shoes because the AZ rocks tear up shoes fast and my road shoes last forever.

  8. #8
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    I ride road shoes on the road and CB EBs in the woods. I personally like the larger platform of my road pedals on long rides. I also like the fact that there is much less play in my road pedals.

    Personally preference though. A bunch of guys I ride with swap back and forth depending on the time of year and the shoes they are wearing.

    As another poster said, check the specialized shoes. You can also buy their inserts for other brands. I ride with the inserts in both my road and MTB shoes. It's not really an issue in the woods, but if I don't have the inserts or specialized shoes on the road I get knee pain after a few rides.

  9. #9
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    i run my eggbeatrs and bontrager rxls on my road bike. someday when i can afford road shoes and pedals i will buy them. i dont care what the roadies think
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  10. #10
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    There is a minor weight penatly that is negligible. The biggest drawback will be sneers or teasing from the road racing community, which has very strict aesthetic rules. It helps if you can dole out a little smackdown to them, as well as walk confidently in the coffee shop before and after the ride.

    The exception (in my eyes) is if you want to race and be competitive in time trial events (or triathlon) on the road. Shoes account for a nontrivial amount of drag, and shoe covers are frequently cited as contributing a significant aero advantage. You may have trouble making such technology work with MTB shoes if you intend on doing such stuff.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by serious View Post
    You could just get some eggbeater pedals for the road bike and be done. I doubt road riders will be offended by that. But it is always good to have more than one bike shoe.

    I have Eggbeaters on all my bikes and 4 mountain bike shoes (for all occasions and weather). I used the shims that come with the shoe-pedal interface to make sure there is no rattle and it works for me.

    this....


    don't care if the road snobs huff at me in MTB shoes and on a CX bike riding them into the ground on the road. i do most of my long rides on the road. very comfy and better for endurance training.

  12. #12
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    Use mt shimano SPD shoes when on my mtb and road bike. For the road bike I got shimano A520 pedals. These are SPD pedals, but single sided and With a larger platform. My mtb uses 175mm cranks and the road bike 170mm both on tripple chainrings with XT and Ultrgra cranks. Not fit issues between the bikes. Longest ride on the road bike has been 1:45 and 31 miles. Typical mtb rides are 2-3 hrs.
    Joe
    2003 KHS Alite 4000 26" Hardtail - XC, All mountain, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

  13. #13
    Rod
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    I use the same shoes and pedals on both bikes without problems. I have completed centuries etc. without any problems. I use simple egg beater pedals and shimano mtb shoes. I have used other shoes with the same great result.
    There is not much choice between rotten apples.

  14. #14
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    Speaking as a cyclist who started on the road, transitioned to track, eventually took up mtb (XC and marathon), and who enjoys a nice gravel grinder now and then, let me say wholeheartedly that "roadies" don't give a half a happy rat fart about the shoes you wear. Just ride.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by mudge View Post
    "roadies" don't give a half a happy rat fart about the shoes you wear.
    Very true. There's too many other things to worry about, to worry about other people's shoes.
    Head Coach, Ben Lomond HS MTB Team
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  16. #16
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    I use SPDs and Sidis for both.

    I'm sure I am losing 0.35 sec per kilometer in time but, what the hey.
    I don't rattle.

  17. #17
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    Going from Crank Brothers Eggbeater pedals and stiff carbon soled MTB shoes to road shoes and pedals (such as Shimano SPD-SL) isn't going to make much difference to your riding. If anything using the same shoes all the time is good because it means your shoe cleat alignment doesn't change at all between bikes, keeping your knees happy.

    The two main advantages of road shoes and some road pedals (such as Shimano SPD-SL) over Crank Brothers Eggbeater pedals are that you have a larger more stable pedaling platform than with the small MTB pedals and the road pedals also tend to have a higher release spring tension when clipping out.

    If your pedalling style isn't super smooth (eg: if your heels move in and out) or you tend to throw the bike around when sprinting then higher pedal release tension can be an important consideration, especially when racing where you're trying hard. Because Crank Brothers Eggbeaters pedals don't have adjustable release tension and are intended for offroad use, where you need to be able to get your foot in and out of the binding quickly, it doesn't take that much sideways pressure to unclip your foot from them.

    Pedal release tension is a bit of a sore point for me at the moment. In August I was trying to accelerate across a roundabout but pulled my right foot out of the MTB SPD pedal binding under maximum pressure and crashed as a result, dislocating my left clavicle and fracturing my left femur.

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