Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    9

    Time to start again!

    Hey guys, I decided to get back into riding again after a 13 years of time off. last month I decided to start by buying a trainer. I'm holding my own for how long I have been out of the game. I now have a Germin heart rate monitor. My biggest thing I have seen is how much things have changed since my racing days back in the mid 90's. That brings me to my question. How bad is my bike out of date?
    I have a 1997 M2 Team S Works, Mostly XTR, and TI rock shox with elastomer.
    Having two kids and a mortgage with a job that is hit or miss, I can't yet afford to drop nice cash on a new bike. Do you guys think that this bike can hold me for a season or two?
    I will never be as good as i was, seeing that I'm 33 now, but I would like to enter a race or two by the end of the year. Is this doable with my set up?

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    190
    Welcome back to riding/racing. Remember, it's all about fun, fitness and the challenge of everything that goes into making it out to a race and riding the best you possibly can. If you do that, you'll have a smile on your face no matter what bike you ride. And btw, at 33 you might have the potential to be better than you have ever been!
    I may not have the best of everything, but I have everything.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    91
    I wouldn't be afraid to race the old S Works. In addition to some new lightweight tires, I think I would also replace the fork as they've come a long way from the '97 SID...especially in terms of stiffness. As I recall late nineties SID was especially noodly. Probably a few year old 80mm travel fork SID or Fox would be a nice improvement for not a lot of money.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    436
    Quote Originally Posted by RideStrong
    And btw, at 33 you might have the potential to be better than you have ever been!
    World Champion Thor Hushovd is 33 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thor_Hushovd

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    9
    Thank you guys for the encouragement! That helps more than you could Imagen. I will look into forks, I think my drive train may need a bit of work first tho. I am in the process of researching all the new gears and such. Seems 8 speeds are out, now its 9 or 10 speeds. Looks like I have to upgrade every thing in order to change over to one of those. sad too, i only have one season on my XTR shifters/brakes and derailers.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    175
    Absolutely no need to upgrade to 9 or 10 speed. Many will tell you they prefer 8 speed anyways. As long as your drivetrain is shifting well and without problems it should be good to go. I'd wait to go to a different drivetrain if and when you get a new bike.Defiinitely agree with the idea of a new fork.

  7. #7
    spec4life???..smh...
    Reputation: spec4life's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    1,091
    Even though the industry is forcing us into 9,10 or even 11, i have no problem with 8 and i can almost say i prefer it.

    I have 8 on my mountain bike and while my buddy is all the time snapping chains on his 9 speed iv never snapped an 8 speed chain...also how many gears do you really need?? I had rather shift once and feel the difference rather than shifting two or three times to get the ratio i want...

    tune it up with some new cables or something and ride it..

  8. #8
    CB2
    CB2 is offline
    Jam Econo
    Reputation: CB2's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    4,214
    The bike won't hold you back. Our 2009 Cat1 30-39 series winner rode a Mongoose with V-brakes.

    In my opinion, the best performance upgrade you can buy would be to convert the wheels to tubeless. Kits cost about $60. There are "ghetto" methods you can do yourself at a fraction of the cost, but the kits make it pretty easy.
    If you have the money to upgrade the fork be careful about how much travel you get. Your original fork probably only has about 60mm of travel, so if you put a 100mm fork on it it might handle like a tractor (I had a 1996 Stumpjumper and a 85mm fork worked well).

  9. #9
    mnoutain bkie rdier
    Reputation: rydbyk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    2,822
    Wow. I raced my entire '92 season on that same bike (not S Works though). Cool. The guys at the races who have been around for awhile will love it. Not sure where you race, but some events like the Keyesville Classic will actually have a retro class. I love seeing those bikes.

    Maybe upgrade the front shock. You will be blown away by how much they have improved. Also, set your wheelset up tubeless than thank me later. Your harsh hardtail will feel like it just got a rear shock added...well sorta. No more puncture flats. Also, back when you were racing everyone thought a super high PSI was the way to roll. Nope. Look up Stan's No Tubes on the innergoogles. Just do it.

    V brakes rule! I kinda wish they would come back. I ride in S. Cal and weigh less than 150lbs. Discs are overkill.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    9
    Thanks guys! Two very good ideas! I will look into both, for right now I have to focus on my training and getting back into shape. I lost 10 lbs in the last month and a all my pants are now to big for me. I'm up to 20 miles a day. I' am very excited about getting back into this! My wife is jumping in on this too. She wants to take a trip to rays indoor park already. I will look very closely at tubeless, i like that idea. The forks may have to wait a month or two. But that gives me some good time to research it.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: gjenkins@'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    1,588
    Race, 13 year hiatus from riding, now jumping back in to racing ... For the record, have you ever thought about just riding for fun?

  12. #12
    inner peace to make peace
    Reputation: TrailNut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    2,284

    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by Liljeepz
    Hey guys, I decided to get back into riding again after a 13 years of time off. last month I decided to start by buying a trainer. I'm holding my own for how long I have been out of the game. I now have a Germin heart rate monitor. My biggest thing I have seen is how much things have changed since my racing days back in the mid 90's. That brings me to my question. How bad is my bike out of date?
    I have a 1997 M2 Team S Works, Mostly XTR, and TI rock shox with elastomer.
    Having two kids and a mortgage with a job that is hit or miss, I can't yet afford to drop nice cash on a new bike. Do you guys think that this bike can hold me for a season or two?
    I will never be as good as i was, seeing that I'm 33 now, but I would like to enter a race or two by the end of the year. Is this doable with my set up?
    Equip' wise...
    a fork, with disc brake tab, with better damping than elastomer (oh how I hated them) would be faster and safer on rougher descends. then get front disk brake, later on. Tubeless rear tire conversion or UST rim with UST tire might save you time on pinch flats.
    “Everyday is a good day,” from the Blue Cliff Records, Yun-men (864-949 AD).

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    9
    Quote Originally Posted by gjenkins@
    Race, 13 year hiatus from riding, now jumping back in to racing ... For the record, have you ever thought about just riding for fun?
    NOPE!
    I will ride for fun a lot. I don't plan on racing every other week, Once or twice for fun this year, If I can hold my own maybe a little more next year. If I flop, then keep it at one or two times a year. That is the one thing about me, (Good or bad, haven't decided yet) I can't just do something, I have to go 120%. I'm just to competitive of a person to stay away from racing, even if it is one or two a year. Just to have a reason to kill my self 5-6 days a week on a trainer.

  14. #14
    inner peace to make peace
    Reputation: TrailNut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    2,284

    Good job!

    Quote Originally Posted by Liljeepz
    NOPE!
    I will ride for fun a lot. I don't plan on racing every other week, Once or twice for fun this year, If I can hold my own maybe a little more next year. If I flop, then keep it at one or two times a year. That is the one thing about me, (Good or bad, haven't decided yet) I can't just do something, I have to go 120%. I'm just to competitive of a person to stay away from racing, even if it is one or two a year. Just to have a reason to kill my self 5-6 days a week on a trainer.

    I plan to start racing again this year.

    Best part of XC racing, esp. a point-to-point course, is that I can ride as fast (or as slow, LOL) as I can without someone yelling at me, risking a citation, or risk hurting others and incur liability on the trail.

    20 to 30 miles of full-on riding's well worth the entry fee.
    “Everyday is a good day,” from the Blue Cliff Records, Yun-men (864-949 AD).

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •