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  1. #1
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    is therea slack XC racer?

    my first mtn bike.. a Trance4.. heavy as can be. Ive been giving the age-grouper beginner XC race class a go, lots of fun!
    Come to realize im not a great bike handler...or it's the Trance geometry....headangle is 70.5.. im always on the edge of losing the front end, washing out. i hate the bike...

    what bike has a slack frontend but light and shorter travel for XC ?
    thanks..
    Frank

  2. #2
    bi-winning
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    70-70.5 degrees is pretty standard, and works fine for most. I can't help but think that there are other factors that are giving you trouble, besides the head tube angle.
    When under pressure, your level of performance will sink to your level of preparation.


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  3. #3
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    im a slack xc racer..

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by xcracer87
    im a slack xc racer..
    How much travel do you have?
    When under pressure, your level of performance will sink to your level of preparation.


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  5. #5
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    Cannondale Rush would fit the bill.

  6. #6
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    Any Kona. Yeah, Cannondale Rush. Yeti. But any of the Kona frames tend to vary between 68 and 70 degrees with 100mm forks.
    "Bikes aren't fast--people are fast. Bikes are overpriced. It's an important distinction."---BikeSnob NYC

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    Giant Anthem X might be ideal? I'll definately buy one as soon as I can afford to change!!

  8. #8
    LCW
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    There *was* the Gary Fisher ProCaliber HiFi - 26", FS, 69.5deg head angle... not slack by definition, but for an XC bike, that's somewhat slack (ie. under 70deg)... alas, for 2010, Fisher no longer offers 26" bikes, except for the burly Roscoe...

    http://fisherbikes.com/bike/archivemodel/486

    2011 Yeti 575 - Fox Float 36 RC2 160 / Fox Float X - 31.9 lbs

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by frank6262
    my first mtn bike.. a Trance4.. heavy as can be. Ive been giving the age-grouper beginner XC race class a go, lots of fun!
    Come to realize im not a great bike handler...or it's the Trance geometry....headangle is 70.5.. im always on the edge of losing the front end, washing out. i hate the bike...

    what bike has a slack frontend but light and shorter travel for XC ?
    thanks..
    Frank
    You're probably not a great bike handler.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by GrantB
    Any Kona. Yeah, Cannondale Rush. Yeti. But any of the Kona frames tend to vary between 68 and 70 degrees with 100mm forks.
    The Hei Hei 100 is 70 degrees. Only .5 degrees different.
    When under pressure, your level of performance will sink to your level of preparation.


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  11. #11
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    Yeti ASR is 69.5*. You can get the alloy/carbon rear end model from Jenson for stupid cheap right now.

  12. #12
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  13. #13
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    i would suggest maybe adjusting your position on the bike (stem length, handlebar height) assuming the bike is the right size for you in the first place.

    after getting the position squared away then it is time to work on technique.

    good luck and have fun!!!

  14. #14
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    Agree w/ whybotherme

    Quote Originally Posted by whybotherme
    i would suggest maybe adjusting your position on the bike (stem length, handlebar height) assuming the bike is the right size for you in the first place.

    after getting the position squared away then it is time to work on technique.

    good luck and have fun!!!
    The position of the handlebars makes a HUGE difference in how a bike handles. A diffence of one or two spaces, 10mm in stem length change and even handlebar width (see recent thread by Le Duke A big thanks to LMN, A. Craig, and the locals.) will significantly change the handling of the bike. Unless this bike is way too big, or way too small that's probably your problem as the Trance is already a pretty good all round bike, not a twitchy race bike.

    From personal experience, I couldn't believe the difference in going from my ss to my greared bike which I thought were both set up the same. Identical bars, stem and frames have identical geometry (both Vassago's). I was mostly riding the rigid SS but for a longer ride jumped on my geared/suspended bike and couldn't believe how unstable it was. Only difference was the front end was a bit higher on the geared bike from two small spacers - approximately a 10mm difference. I wish I'd noticed this during the race season - no wonder I was 10 minutes behind the guy in 1st .

    Good luck sorting it out, but if you get the right combo for you I'm guessing you'll be much happier with the bike.

    PT

  15. #15
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    Yup...

    Yeti ASR carbon. 73 degree seat angle and 69 degree head angle with a 100 mm fork. I am strongly considering the new ASR 5 carbon, with 5" travel and a 120 mm fork for endurance racing, it has a 68 degree head angle, so should have super stability for those times when one is seeing crosseyed. The Yetis are very light, and the simple suspension design works very well-the yeti geometry centers the rider between the wheels, making for very balanced handling going up and down, and none of the typical XC racer twitchiness.

  16. #16
    LMN
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    If you feel like you are going to lose the front end a steep head angle is not the problem. In order to get the front end to bite you have to weight it, steep angles help with this.

    Your issues are probably not bike related (although 70.5 is a little slack for my taste). Try working on getting your weight forward when you are cornering. When you find the sweet spot the rear wheel will actually drift through the turn without you having to grab the brakes.

    Slack angles are for steep trails where gravity gets your weight on the front end. A slack angle bike on the typical XC makes cornering rather difficult.

    There is a lot of changes you can make to your position and suspension setting to help it corner. Going a bit softer in the front fork can really help with front end bite. Increase the air pressure in the rear end, to use a nascar term, you can "loosen" the bike up.
    Last edited by LMN; 10-20-2009 at 04:07 PM.

  17. #17
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    Trance is slack enough

    Assuming your bike setup is right the problem may be the front fork and or tire. I've noticed that my fork and how it's setup; as well as my front tire and it's air pressure is usually the culprit when my front end washes out.

    I also agree with the others; if your bike isn't setup properly for your body (reach, inseam, etc) then you won't feel in control. Bike setup is huge; seat height and fore aft; handlebar height and width, stem length are the biggies.

    I had a trance 2008 and it was the easiest bike to corner and descend with-sounds to me like it could be a tire/tire pressure issue.
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  18. #18
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    what tires and what PSI you running? might be your fork set up too, if it "dives" in the corner, that can feel sketchy. i am also guessing it is not the geometry, but some other set up or just general riding issues.

    good luck.

  19. #19
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    as others are chiming in the order of importance should be:

    set up the bike to work right.

    learn how to use it.

  20. #20
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    one more vote for 69 degree yeti asr, stupid fast and stable

  21. #21
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    ok thanks..i'll go over all your tips..i need it stable..
    still think i'll throw it on Craigslist though..

    Frank

  22. #22
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    the new blur xc has a 69.5 head angle with a 100mm fork.

  23. #23
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    Most off the shelf mountain bikes will do you fine in the handling department so long as you practice enough at it and your skills / body adapt to the bike (provided that it is a good fit for you). I have some friends who ride fully rigid and they can keep up to me on some pretty gnarly trails while I am on a hardtail. It's about how the bike but more importantly how the rider handles the trails.

  24. #24
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    What tire and psi?

    What front fork?

  25. #25
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    If you're washing out in the front maybe consider a different tire before you sell the bike off - something a little larger and maybe run less psi for grip? Might be worth a try and you can still keep the tire if it doesn't work out. Weighting the front end might help too, or google up some vids to see if there's something you're missing as far as bike handling goes. If you have a skinny high pressure tire up front you might just have to deal with sketchy handling.

    I've got a yeti asr ('03) and I feel like its great on the uphill and handles well on the down. It has a long wheelbase which also contributes to stability, good stuff for the rocky terrain here in the front range. I'd rather have a slightly slacker setup too, I don't feel like the hills in typical XC races are so technical that I need super steep angles for steering.

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