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  1. #1
    Dad
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    New question here. Tacx Bushido vs Computrainer?

    Apologies if this thread already exists; ran a search and drew a blank, so...

    I'm looking to buy an ergo trainer and have been lead to believe that the top end choices are a Computrainer or a Tacx Bushido?

    Can anyone provide any reviews/feedback or even comparisons for these two models? I think the Bushido comes in at a much lower price and can do everything the Computrainer can?

  2. #2
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    heres a few reviews:

    tacx review

    tacx review

    cycling news review

    bike rader computrainer review

    pez cycling computrainer review

    link reviewing tacx and computrianer

    I have used a computrainer extensively and found it to be a great tool. Well made but dated. Spare parts are cheap. Way to many wires. lots of courses.
    I found Tacx units to be cheap and service to be an issue.

  3. #3
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    I've had a Tacx Excel Basic Ergotrainer for several years along with a powertap; I've also had clients with computrainers and SRM's at the same time. The computrainer is quite accurate on power readouts; the Tacx units are not nearly as accurate on power. (I've used my Tacx with a powertap dozens of times, and it's not accurate on power and not really that consistent on power either--although I've heard that the newer Tacx models have more consistent readings because of a calibration feature--examples: consistently high by xx% or consistently low by x%.) Of course, you pay for that accuracy. Don't really know about the other features (videos, interaction, etc.) because I've mostly been focused on power numbers.
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  4. #4
    Dad
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    Now I'm completely confused. I am looking to get something high end to really ramp up fitness over the winter while dispelling boredom. What about VR trainers? Reviews seem to be all over the place in terms of opinion, with some pretty strong language directed at Tacx as a company. That really makes me wonder.

    Maybe I should re-phrase my question and ask what is, quite simply, the best indoor trainer on the market?

  5. #5
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    I have the Tacx VR trainer and I love it. I get a really good work out and am not bored during the session. I've also used my GPX data from my Garmin to replicate actual rides I've done. While not VR-enabled, you do see the contour and can pretty easily match up where on the trail you are relative to the trainer. I have the Polar T31 strap for the HRM function and it works fine. Real-life videos are cool, but I've only used the demo that the software comes with. The SW does come with a fair amount of VR terrain, however you can purchase the RLV and do some famous road routes from what I've seen.

    Overall, I cannot imagine a better experience. I've read others say the power measurements are very accurate, and the new software does have a calibration feature. It gets the job done - challenging, motivating, fun work outs any time you have time!

  6. #6
    Dad
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    And now friend of mine, whose opinion I value very much, has also sung the praise of the Tacx VR line. What to do!?;

    "I have had a Tacx iMagic virtual trainer for 6 years & love it- apart from sitting in the basement for hours going nowhere. No problems with it, lots of fun features & racing against virtual partners, I have yet to beat them, but I'm sure I'll die trying!

    Power, Watts, Cadence, HR, you can pre-program you own power, slope, HR workouts. You need a spare computer or a laptop to run the software. I also have a regular Tacx trainer which has been fine. So not sure why you are hearing they are crap, not in my world - Thankfully.

    But, a power tap in your rear hub will do the same thing & you can take it on the road with you on the spring & there will be no discrepancy of Power. Makes your bike heavier, but hey it's a training tool. Those run ~$1000, cheaper if it's not wireless. Then you just need a regular wind trainer or rollers, which are pretty cheap."

  7. #7
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    sounds like you need to spend a little more time understanding what you need and want from a trainer/ power meter
    There are many choices and huge differences in quality, accuracy and cost. If you can, try each one and compair yourself.

  8. #8
    Dad
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    Yes - you're right. I do however know I would like;

    Power
    HR
    Cadence
    Ability to design and program workouts
    Pre-set workouts
    Tracking and development software - goal setting, etc
    Some 'cool stuff' would be nice, like ability to use Google Maps/Earth for route creation, some level of VR, racing, etc

  9. #9
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    Yes - you're right. I do however know I would like;

    Power
    HR
    Cadence
    Ability to design and program workouts
    Pre-set workouts
    Tracking and development software - goal setting, etc
    Some 'cool stuff' would be nice, like ability to use Google Maps/Earth for route creation, some level of VR, racing, etc

    Budget is up to around $1,000

  10. #10
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    I think the tacx will do more for you regarding VR, Google Earth, etc. It will certainly handle the basics such as power/hr/cadence, as well as specific work outs such as time/slope distance/slope power, etc. Virtually every combination you can think of in this vein, it should do. Be sure to have road-type gearing though. My mountain gearing of 44/12-28 doesn't work so well on the downhills since i max at 25MPH. 50t+ is needed to be able to pedal and I just got a crank to do that.

  11. #11
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    computrainer

    I have had mine over 15 years and it still works great.It use the old nintendo box .I have mad up my own course and ride some that came pre loaded.I have the newer type that uses a real computor and has great graphics but havent took the time or effort to set it up. I usualy ride 1-2 hours and go as hard or as easy as I want.Music with headphonmes, big screen tv.and window to see outside help.I use mine year round when I cant get outside to ride road or mountain.

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