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  1. #1
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    so is lance right, it isnt about the bike?

    So I am searching around for a new bike like a mad man but is it really necessary? The bike I have seems fine. It is a hard tail but I seem to prefer them over FS due to my over analyzing everything simple works better for me. Its not heavy, good components but some reason I am under the impression that if I get a nice new shinny bike I will be faster next season.

    Any thoughts?

  2. #2
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    I think for some people buying a new or better bike is motivating to them to train and/or push harder...if that's the case then you might well be faster next season on a new bike.
    '10 Pivot Cycles Mach 5! -- 07' C'dale Prophet 3 -- 08' C'dale Caffeine HT /\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/ Pivot FTW

  3. #3
    bi-winning
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffkenn
    but some reason I am under the impression that if I get a nice new shinny bike I will be faster next season.

    Any thoughts?
    I think that a new bike will not make you significantly faster. Training smarter could make you faster though.
    When under pressure, your level of performance will sink to your level of preparation.


    Shorthills Cycling Club

  4. #4
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    It's not about the bike, never was, never will be.

  5. #5
    AZ
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    New bike , same engine . Some engine work for next season might be more productive .

  6. #6
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    I know my training picked up when I bought a new bike. Just seemed more motivated because I wanted to ride it. Then again I suffer from new bike syndrome. And new car syndrome. Pretty much new anything syndrome.

  7. #7
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    Yea I agree the motivation of a new bike is great, but in the end its the same engine
    cheers
    Pagey

  8. #8
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    If you talking professional ranks where everyone is on a top level uber bikes, it's not about the bike. At the amateur level if you're trying to compete on a 26 pounder against someone on a sub-20 professional level machine, it can be about the bike. Also if you're on an old decrepit bike that can finish a race without mechanical problems, you have a great chance of losing more time to someone with significantly inferior fitness, but can ride steady for the whole race.

  9. #9
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    Even at the amateur level, Johnny Fat Boy on a 26 pound hardtail vs. Frank Fatty Pants on a 20 pound Scott Scale isn't going to make a big difference. If you're out of shape and/or have lousy bike handling skills you're not going to have the ability to get the most out of the bike.

  10. #10
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    Agreed with it's not the bike but the rider.... but the one thing that can make a difference is if it's a different geomotry. If you are cramped on your bike, then a bike with, say, a longer top tube may make you faster. There's a lot on a bike that can make a bike feel more comfortable to YOU, I emphasize the you because it's not the bike making you faster but being more comfortable on the bike that makes you able to be faster.

  11. #11
    AZ
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    If the difference between a podium and an also ran is your current ride then step up to a new one .

  12. #12
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    buy a new component or 2. it might help tons. it may just give that extra willingness to suffer through a little more training. its that new syndrome.
    Ride & Smile

  13. #13
    It's about showing up.
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    Actually

    If you listen to the folks on MTBR it's about the bike if you switch to a 29er, SS, or fully rigid.

  14. #14
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    Thanks for all the advice. One thing I noticed on my race bike from last year is the cranks are 170mm. I thought they were 175mm's. That might be a problem.

  15. #15
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    A refreshing article on pro 24hr racer Kelly Magelky.

    http://www.bikeradar.com/mtb/news/ar...-fuel-98-23633

    2nd at the 24hr MOAB on astock standard Top Fuel - and not even the top model.
    cheers
    Pagey

  16. #16
    Just Ride.
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    To a degree, if your pushing a 18kg bike and someone with less strength but the same agility pushing a sub 10kg bike they are going to have a better chance. But when it comes down to it there is a small difference.

  17. #17
    LCW
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    I think wheels and tires can play a big part... low rolling resistance and low rotating mass help reduce fatigue, especially if a tight twisty course where you're constantly having to slow down and re-accelerate...
    2011 Yeti 575 - 2015 Fox Float 36 RC2 160 / Fox Float X - 30.6 lbs

  18. #18
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    That is where the smart $ is.

    Quote Originally Posted by MI_canuck
    I think wheels and tires can play a big part... low rolling resistance and low rotating mass help reduce fatigue, especially if a tight twisty course where you're constantly having to slow down and re-accelerate...
    For technical courses a solid bike that the rider is comfortable on can be more more of an asset than absolute fitness levels. Heavy wheels and tires will turn any bike into a slug.
    The wheel is a extension of the foot

  19. #19
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    If it wasn't about the bike, why would Lance and Co. have been spending all that time in wind tunnels on bikes increasingly made of plastic over the last decade or so? Surely those scientists weren't taking accurate measurements of Armstrong's determination and grit. My friends, we should look at that sentence for what it is, a nice title for a book.
    "Bikes aren't fast--people are fast. Bikes are overpriced. It's an important distinction."---BikeSnob NYC

  20. #20
    It's about showing up.
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    LOL at calling BS.

    [QUOTE=GrantB]If it wasn't about the bike, why would Lance and Co. have been spending all that time in wind tunnels "

    Well, it's not about the bike but Lance's position and while we're at it we'll tweek the wind profile of the bike just in case it really is about the bike after all, err, uh, yeah.

  21. #21
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    bike has a lot to do with it but the law of diminishing returns is at play. For example, would an amateur riding a 30lb hardtail see an improvement by using a 26 pound short travel race bike? I would think a definite yes for most trails.

    However, would the same amateur get an equal improvement by going from that 26 pound bike to a 22 pound bike? probably not.

  22. #22
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    A great engine needs a great chassis in order to become a great car/motorcycle. So yes, the bike does matter, but there's no number you can put on how much.

  23. #23
    CB2
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    I resemble that remark

    Quote Originally Posted by Berkeley Mike
    If you listen to the folks on MTBR it's about the bike if you switch to a 29er, SS, or fully rigid.

    Well it works for me
    If you go to extremes comparing a 40 lb rigid with a 22 lb FS, yeah, the bike will make a difference. But when your in the same ballpark it's about the rider's fitness and skills.
    One way that it is about the bike is if your bike makes it to the finish line. Have your mechanical shiite sorted out so a flat or some other mishap doesn't take you out.

  24. #24
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    It's really not about the bike, but ti think what Slufyer said is 100% true and if you feel like you need a new bike it might well give you the encouragement to ride faster next year. I know when I get a new bike it sure insoires me to ride hard and try more stuff.

    Quote Originally Posted by sluflyer06
    I think for some people buying a new or better bike is motivating to them to train and/or push harder...if that's the case then you might well be faster next season on a new bike.
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??
    MTB Barbados
    My Phantom pics

  25. #25
    It's about showing up.
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    People talk about the effect of intangibles

    and athletes can be remarkably superstitious. Yet these thing address something very tangible and that is the dispostion.

    Huge.

    As such, "it works for me."

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