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  1. #1
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    Single speeds and trainers

    First off, I'm not a racer but would like to work on my fitness levels over the winter and maybe hit a couple of local races next year. I'm a 1 bike guy and it's a single speed. I picked up a cheap magnetic trainer to try to get some extra saddle time with, but it always feels like I'm just shy of spinning out with it. Just doesn't feel like much resistance at all, no matter how fast I pedal. Would getting a cheap, bigger chainring be a decent option for increasing the resistance for indoor rides?

  2. #2
    Formerly of Kent
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    This may seem like a dumb question, but have you adjusted the resistance on the trainer, or lowered your tire pressure?

    Because that can drastically change the amount of power required to go a certain speed on the trainer.

  3. #3
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    Get some rollers, if you want to keep riding the SS. Unless you put a much bigger gear on your SS, it's always going to feel weird and not provide enough resistance.

  4. #4
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    This particular trainer is supposed to be progressive resistance, but I can't tell much difference no matter how hard I peddle.

    Considered rollers, but I like the space savings of a trainer. How much difference is there in resistance?

  5. #5
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    Rollers don't provide tons of resistance, it all depends on the roller size you go with. You can also add a headwind unit. But they feel is much better and generally work better for SS riders.

  6. #6
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    Single speeds and trainers

    Quote Originally Posted by jonathan creason View Post
    This particular trainer is supposed to be progressive resistance, but I can't tell much difference no matter how hard I peddle.

    Considered rollers, but I like the space savings of a trainer. How much difference is there in resistance?
    Progressive resistance turbo trainers (such as the Kurt Kinetic Road Machine) are designed to be used with gears. You change up through the gears to make the effort harder.

    If you're going to be using a single speed bike you'd be better off getting a variable resistance turbo trainer - one where you have a lever on the handlebars to increase or decrease the resistance provided by the magnetic brake, so that you can change pedalling resistance without changing gear.

    This Tackx Blue Motion T2600 is an example of the manual type of turbo trainer that I'd consider.

    http://www.tacx.com/en/products/trainers/blue-motion

    .

  7. #7
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    Wind trainers - that is those that use air as resistance such as the Lemonds - could be applicable here. As aerodynamic drag increases exponentially the harder you go the more resistance is offered. And the inertia of the Lemond helps give a more road like feel.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by TapewormWW View Post
    As aerodynamic drag increases exponentially the harder you go the more resistance is offered.
    Nope, it's the proportional to the velocity cubed.

  9. #9
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    Thanks for the advice everyone. I think I'm going to head to craigslist with it and take another look at what I want.

  10. #10
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    I used a trainer for a bit last fall with my ss. I did 5-10 minute warm up at my normal 90-100 rpm, after that I would do 1 minute at 140+ rpm and then 1 minute at normal. Did this for 10 to 15 cycles then I did a 5-10 minute cool down.

    Worked ut al rght. I prefer either riding or just running instead of the trainer though.

  11. #11
    pain intolerant
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    I love the spin bike I purchased used for $100 a few years ago.
    Quieter, easy to adjust, and all the resistance you could ever want.
    Only draw back I can see is the amount of space it takes up.

  12. #12
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    Thought about a spin bike, but space is an issue unfortunately.

    I did air the rear tire down some and gave it another shot. Didn't suck as bad and was able to get my HR up to a decent level.

  13. #13
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    What gear ratio are you using? As a minimum, use a high ratio to allow a decent power output while still at a reasonable cadence.
    My rides:
    Lynskey Ti Pro29 SL singlespeed
    GF Superfly 29er HT
    S-Works Roubaix SL3 Dura Ace
    Pake French 75 track

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