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  1. #1
    Giant Anthem
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    Saddle sores/Good seat recommendation.

    Any suggestions for a comfortable road seat?-I don't care about weight too much since I only race XC and train on the road.

    I got a Selle Italia with my XC race bike and put it on my road bike for the winter since I'm on the rollers now. I'm adjusting to the seat to some extent but I'm fighting it most of the ride. It's great on the mountain bike but killing me on the rollers. Saddle sores and all.

    My last seat, an old performance slx works not much better and neither does a WTB rocket V race. Actually I've never had a comfortable road seat. I'm 5'8", 150 pounds and have a medium hip structure any suggestions?

    I use chamois butter and take care of the nether regions so its not that-also bike fit is dialed in as well.
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  2. #2
    I'd rather be riding
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    I have a bontrager take off saddle (from a lower level alloy bike) on my road bike (used only for training) and I really like it. I'd check with your local shop and see if they have anything cheap you can try. I run a bontrager evoke rxl on my mtb for reference.

  3. #3
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    Use a dedicated washrag in the shower. When you shower, soap it up real good and scrub the hell out of the infected area.

    Make sure to keep it separated that way your family members don't use it by accident. That always cures the problem for me.

    Oh, and the following saddles work for me:
    -Specialized Toupe (road saddle for last 4 seasons)
    -Fizik Tundra
    -WTB Silverado or Rocket V.
    But preferances are still pretty individual. I run them all slightly nose down.

    Our team shop has a great saddle demo program:
    Biker's Edge - Northern Utah's Best Road Bikes, Mountain Bikes, Cyclocross Bikes, Certified RETUL Bike Fitting, Cycling Apparel and Cycling Accessories
    It's nice to try before you buy. It's really the only way to make saddle determinations.
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  4. #4
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    I have just learned this recently as I went through pressure seat testing at Cyclologic in AZ to get the right saddle for me. People’s sit bones are different so each saddle requirement is different for each person. It is similar to shoe foot beds and which one fits your feet better. You will get many different answers as there are many different shapes of feet. There are a lot of saddle shapes that are better for one rider and not for someone else. This being said, you might have to try a few out or see if a local bike shop has a 3d fit system or pressure sensing system to get you in the right saddle. The downside… $$.

  5. #5
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    Maybe you need better bibs. I've never gotten a saddle sore while using my Rapha bibs even while riding in the rain. If I wear anything but my Raphas in the rain I will usually get a sore.

    Saddles? You're really going to have to try a bunch out and see what works for you. Go with something new like the Ergon or old school like the Turbomatic. Maybe you can find a local store with a demo program. Good luck.

  6. #6
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    Is this a problem that's specific to turbo training? Are you ok comfort wise when riding outdoors on a roadbike?

    Turbo training is much tougher for staying comfortable as you tend to stay in the saddle pedalling more than when riding outdoors.

    If you're getting saddle sore on the turbo trainer I'd suggest experimenting with lowering your saddle height and also try pointing the nose of the saddle down. By lowering your saddle it means that your hips won't rock as much side to side, reducing friction and therefore saddle sores hopefully. By pointing the saddle nose down it takes some pressure off also. I have an old bike just for the turbo trainer. The saddle position on it looks odd but it works. My main mountain bike has a much more traditional saddle setup though.

    Saddle sores and boils can often be down to irritated hair folicles. Where your pedalling action makes the hair folicles rub is where you can get discomfort. If you shave any hair from the areas where you're getting saddle sores it could help reduce the frequency and recurrence of the saddle sores.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by WR304 View Post
    Is this a problem that's specific to turbo training? Are you ok comfort wise when riding outdoors on a roadbike?

    Turbo training is much tougher for staying comfortable as you tend to stay in the saddle pedalling more than when riding outdoors.

    If you're getting saddle sore on the turbo trainer I'd suggest experimenting with lowering your saddle height and also try pointing the nose of the saddle down. By lowering your saddle it means that your hips won't rock as much side to side, reducing friction and therefore saddle sores hopefully. By pointing the saddle nose down it takes some pressure off also. I have an old bike just for the turbo trainer. The saddle position on it looks odd but it works. My main mountain bike has a much more traditional saddle setup though.

    Saddle sores and boils can often be down to irritated hair folicles. Where your pedalling action makes the hair folicles rub is where you can get discomfort. If you shave any hair from the areas where you're getting saddle sores it could help reduce the frequency and recurrence of the saddle sores.

    Yeah, the problems I'm having is from the rollers. A lot more time spent in the same position. I'll try lowering the seat, I like the shaving idea but not sure if I'll try that yet.
    Last edited by 2fst4u; 02-11-2013 at 06:50 PM.
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  8. #8
    lgh
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    "Saddle sores and boils can often be down to irritated hair folicles."

    1. Always change shorts/bibs and clean them between sessions on the bike. If you are not doing this, I suspect that is the problem.
    2. If you shave around your sit bones, stop doing it. The hair stubs slip below the skin surface, start the irritation, and drag some bugs down there. Infection sets in and you have a boil.
    3. Saddles and their setup are personal. You have to find what works for you. I'm guessin' most everyone on this forum has or had a box full of saddles they tried before they found one that worked. After you find one that works, don't change or you will be re-creating problems.

    Larry

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by limba View Post
    Maybe you need better bibs. I've never gotten a saddle sore while using my Rapha bibs even while riding in the rain. If I wear anything but my Raphas in the rain I will usually get a sore.
    Best Advice

    I have like 3 good pairs of bibs that I rotate through... I need to buy some more.
    If your shorts are bad, just go ahead and throw them out to reduce temptation to wear them instead of doing laundry. Cheap, ill fitting shorts are a recipe for sores.
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  10. #10
    mnoutain bkie rdier
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hoverbike View Post
    I have just learned this recently as I went through pressure seat testing at Cyclologic in AZ to get the right saddle for me. People’s sit bones are different so each saddle requirement is different for each person. It is similar to shoe foot beds and which one fits your feet better. You will get many different answers as there are many different shapes of feet. There are a lot of saddle shapes that are better for one rider and not for someone else. This being said, you might have to try a few out or see if a local bike shop has a 3d fit system or pressure sensing system to get you in the right saddle. The downside… $$.
    +1. You will find alot of overlap though. There seems to be the standard 10 or so saddles that generally work well for each diff person sorta thing. I have a Fizik Chameleon on my road bike. Seems like there is a break in period...not loving it, but has potential. The Specialized body geom saddles seem to be fairly popular too. On my race mtb, I am currently running the carbon railed PRO Turnix saddle and I like it.

    Like you mentioned though, a TRUE test of a good saddle is one that you can survive a trainer session on. You can get away with a saddle that is not perfect on a mtb because you are standing so much during mtb rides or lightly hovering on the saddle.

    Those long road rides with limited standing are the true tests here..

    Still....not sure if I will ever find that dang "magic" saddle. Is it out there? Also, make SURE you have good bibshorts with a GREAT chamois...as important as anything here!

  11. #11
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    What I have found when I'm having unusual seat problems, is that I have the seat a little too high, causing me to rock back and forth a little bit, creating friction.
    dm

  12. #12
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    Thanks for the suggestions. I changed my seat back to my older one. The shape is nicer on the sit bones and doesn't rub the crease between the legs and nether regions... as much. But it's "slidey" and I have to adjust frequently pushing my butt back all the time-so I tilted the seat up a hair and and moved the seat forward, this helped a lot. I adjusted it like 8 times in an hour basically not getting in a great ride on the rollers but just adjusting a lot. As others have said I'll have to re adjust when it's time to ride outside again Also, I'm going to get a better post so I can micro adjust the tilt and get some new chamois. And yes I wash mine after every use-who the heck would not wash their shorts after every use?? Gross!
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  13. #13
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    In my opinion shaving is a bad idea. Hair reduceds friction and friction causes saddle sores.

    If you have a local specialized dealer they offer saddles in various widths. mine has some demo saddles so you can try a few and pick the best for you. They also have a way to measure your sitbones and did not charge me for the service. Probably not as good as a 3d ass-map but it helped me alot. I started searching for saddles for the same reason and went with an Avatar gel 143.
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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sheepo5669 View Post
    Cheap, ill fitting shorts are a recipe for sores.
    It's not just a factor of cheap. One of the most expensive pair of shorts I have owned caused more problems than all the rest combined. The pad probably had some sort of anti-microbial treatment that my parts didn't approve of.

    The best advice I've seen on here is what I'll repeat. Find yourself a good saddle demo program and make sure that you get in a lot of hours on each one unless it is hurting right off the bat. You won't know if that saddle works for you until you've been on it at least three hours. I think I tried at least six saddles before I landed on the Tundra 2 on my MTB and the Arione on my cross bike.

  15. #15
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    May have missed if it was mentioned but you could have the right type of saddle but the wrong size. To be uncomfortable after only an hour is a serious problem

  16. #16
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    Saddle sores/Good seat recommendation.

    As far as saddles go I like one with a perfectly flat profile along with a cutout. Three saddles I really like are the Terry Zero, Terry Fly Ti and Selle Italia SLK.

    As for preventing saddle sores I've found that a good chamois cream (I like AsMasters) helps a lot but not nearly as much as a pair of shorts/bibs with a "great" chamois. I really like Specialized's RBX bibs myself. A little pricy but are worth every penny IMO.

    Oh, and DO NOT SHAVE down there!!! That is Horrible advice!!! Lol

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by lgh View Post
    2. If you shave around your sit bones, stop doing it. The hair stubs slip below the skin surface, start the irritation, and drag some bugs down there. Infection sets in and you have a boil.
    This is one of those subjects where it's hard to be specific and go into detail without being too specific.

    You did ask so here goes.

    You can use other methods of exfoliating or trimming excess hair besides a razor, for example scissors or wax. A razor isn't going to work in some delicate locations anyway. I tend to use scissors. Small scissors such as nail scissors work best. That means the issue of ingrowing hair doesn't arise because you haven't cut the hairs so close to the skin.

    Saddle soreness is one of those all encompassing terms that covers most discomfort arising from sitting in a bike saddle. I wasn't thinking so much of the sit bones as the focus for hair removal as hair there isn't an issue for me. What I tend to find is that I'm far more likely to get chafing on my inner thighs and taint. In those areas having the hair rubbing is noticeable whilst riding. It's a sharp pulling pain. If I'm doing a lot of miles then the hair in those areas actually all gets removed naturally from friction. That takes time though so it's more effective to make sure the hair there is short enough to begin with that it isn't being snagged or pulled whilst pedalling.

    My preferred chamois cream is the Assos version. It's antibacterial and quite a thick formulation which tends to stay in place longer than the others for reducing friction. Many of the chamois creams you can get are too thin and soak into your skin or the pad of your shorts really quickly. An example of one that doesn't work very well is Udderly Smooth. I wasn't impressed by that at all.

    Assos Chamois Cream
    Assos Chamois Creme | Buy Online | ChainReactionCycles.com

    My method for applying chamois cream is to leave it as late as possible. Put some on the shorts pad and then just before you head out of the door or begin the turbo session apply plenty directly onto your skin in the areas where you tend to get chafing. After applying chamois cream I'll try not to sit down again so it will still be in the correct position on the body. By leaving it as late as possible it has less chance to soak away, staying effective for longer into the ride.

    My favourite cycling shorts for comfort are the Castelli Bodypaint bib shorts. They have one of the best pads around.

  18. #18
    lgh
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    A colleague of mine, recently deceased, is a renowned dermatologist and former President of the American Academy of Dermatology. The irritation and creation of a boil is as he explained it. It is more likely an issue with certain hair types such as coarse, curly hair and with certain types of shaving methods. Specifically, some people will not tolerate an electric razor because it pulls the hair up before cutting it to a length that keeps it just below the skin surface. Not good. For those, a rich shaving cream , qualtiy brush, and sharp razor are best. For some, they can shave with whatever they want and never have a problem. For some, they should never shave unless required.

    Larry

  19. #19
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    I definitely wasn't suggesting an electric razor!

    Since switching to using exclusively Assos chamois cream several years ago I've had dramatically fewer (only 2-3 times in total per year) saddle boil issues. Maybe that's down to the antibacterial properties but it does seem to be helpful for me.

    The other thing to mention is that how you wash your cycling shorts makes a difference. Because you wear cycling shorts without underwear you're sitting with your bare skin directly against the pad. Cycling shorts should only be worn once before being washed whenever possible. Wearing them multiple times is a recipe for problems.

    If you just throw your cycling kit in with normal clothes the washing machine detergent can end up not being rinsed out, staying in the pad and causing skin irritation. A good example was a ride in 2010. I was with another rider when we were caught in a heavy rain shower. His cycling shorts started bubbling as the detergent started reacting. It looked bizarre.

    I wash my cycling kit seperately from normal clothes, use Stergene handwash liquid (a small amount poured on a jersey in the machine, and a delicate wash setting in the washing machine. A delicate setting helps to protect the lycra shorts from damage and extends their life also.




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