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  1. #1
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    recipes for food on the bike?

    Anybody cook food that goes down easy on the bike?
    I dread eating goo's and bars. I was intrigued by Allen Lim's rice cakes but they are high in cholesterol with the eggs and bacon and unfortunately my body has a hard time converting those damn LDL's.

    Got any ideas for things to cook and stuff in the jersey pockets?

  2. #2
    I'd rather be riding
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    I like baked goods!

  3. #3
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    I make a variation of the Lim rice cakes without the bacon and eggs, but with some almond flour and cinnamon. Works great. A touch of whey isolate can be added for protein.

  4. #4
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    Figs and bananas all the way bro, no messing around, natural and you can throw away the wrapper

  5. #5
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    Sensitive stomach here. I eat potato's, mini ones, cooked, little salt, olive oil and seasoning added. Easy to eat on lower intensity training rides. I've done mashed potatos and eaten them like a gel in endurance races. Never have an issues with potatos upsetting my stomach. For shorter, high intensity races (less than 2 hours), gels get me through as they are convenient.

  6. #6
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    I've been racing/training for 10 years now and I seem to get lazier and lazier.

    Whole grain bread sandwich with nutella and bananas seem to work well for long rides. And is about as much effort as I want to put into homemade fuel.

    When i get lazy I just grab cliff bar and/or measure out EFS gel in a flask. And take some extra money to buy stuff in the store. I like the PowerBar Harvest stuff they sell in the convience stores.

    But I do up to 1.5 hour training rides taking nothing with me. If 2+ hours, then I plan some calories.

    I think a lot of people tend to go overboard on bike fuel.
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  7. #7
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    I like to borrow ideas from Lim by making a waffle sandwich with Nutella and raspberry preserves. If I'm feeling lazy I'll just grab a Clif bar, but the waffle is definitely preferred.
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  8. #8
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    recipes for food on the bike?

    Liam's rice cakes and variations of them are great, but you have to plan ahead and make a batch. When I get tired of gels, chews and waffles (and combinations, such as honey stinger gel and waffle sandwich - messy but packs a punch) I often grab fig newtons, prunes, bananas or dried banana, a protein bar, and/or some nuts. And a camelback full of scratch labs drink mix.

  9. #9
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    I am on a gluten free diet. I eat Udi's gluten free cinnamon raisin bread with apple butter and almond or peanut butter. I will swap out apple butter with other jellies when I want too. I then cut the sandwich into thirds and put it in a sandwich saver. I can eat it on the fly when I wear cheaper baggy jerseys, if I have on a nice tight jersey I can't get to it without stopping or really slowing down. This works better for me than jels on really long rides. I typically eat first 1/3 at 45 minutes and then an additional third every 30 minutes. If I need to bring more than one sandwich. I have also found eating a gel in between sandwich pieces also helps.

    Hope this helps, it took me a while to get the timing down.

  10. #10
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    Cooking is overrated. Dried Fruit for short rides, add nuts as the rides get long.

    Fructose is immediate fuel and fruit is tasty.

    Nuts are high in fat and protein which can help with satiety for long days on a bike.
    Raised in a Chicken-Coop by Chickens

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sheepo5669 View Post
    Cooking is overrated. Dried Fruit for short rides, add nuts as the rides get long.

    Fructose is immediate fuel and fruit is tasty.

    Nuts are high in fat and protein which can help with satiety for long days on a bike.
    Also know as peanut butter and jelly sandwich.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crispy01 View Post
    Figs and bananas all the way bro, no messing around, natural and you can throw away the wrapper
    Dont panic. Its organic!
    Raised in a Chicken-Coop by Chickens

  13. #13
    mnoutain bkie rdier
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    I do like Lim's rice cakes, BUT I can't stand white rice when it is out of the fridge. Are you guys eating these things cold? Disgusting..haha.

    On warmer days, they warm up a bit in my jersey pocket, but still don't taste anywhere near as good as they do fresh out of the rice cooker sorta thing..

    Other than that, I just eat normal food. PB&J white bread. Higher fiber products are a no no for me...tear up my stomache!

    You will also notice that you can almost eat a cheeseburger on a base mile day, whereas you have to be much more careful on high intesity days that stress the stomache's digestive system a lot more..

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by rydbyk View Post
    You will also notice that you can almost eat a cheeseburger on a base mile day, whereas you have to be much more careful on high intesity days that stress the stomache's digestive system a lot more..
    So true. I can eat pretty much anything on base rides but have to be pretty selective on high intensity rides. Gu is my go-to for high intensity stuff as my stomach can handle it no problem. Last time I tried eating a bar on a high intensity ride was not so good.

  15. #15
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    Banana - Peel it, eat it, chuck it, done.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sheepo5669 View Post
    Fructose is immediate fuel
    That's not technically correct. Fructose requires conversion to glucose which I think happens in the liver. This is why, for example, honey (which is high in fructose, though it varies by blend / processing / adulteration / etc) has a lower glycemic index than glucose syrup.

    However, dried fruit contains a mixed of glucose and fructose and perhaps added sucrose as well (which itself is 50/50), so you get some blood glucose immediately and some after a bit of time. It certainly seems to be effective. I have read blog posts to the effect of "back in the day we just used Fig Newtons", before energy bars per se existed.

  17. #17
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    The ones with Apple and cinnamon are really good. The recipe is on the website.

  18. #18
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    Howdy folks. New here.
    When I'm lazy, I stick with bananas and Cliff bars. When I make something, I make these:


    Raw Energy Bars~Chocolate Espresso

    Ingredients



    2 Cups (280g) Raw Hazelnuts

    Cup (60g) Raw Almond (without skin)
    1 Cup (150g) Moist Medjool Dates, pitted and chopped
    1 Cup (140g) Unsweetened Dried Cranberries
    1 Cup (160g) Tart Cherries
    1 Cup (100g) Cocoa Powder
    1 Tbsp Ground Espresso

    
 tsp Sea Salt

    Cup (40g) Unsweetened Shredded Coconuts

    1 Tbsp Vanilla Extract
    1 to 2 Tbsp Cold Water



    Equipment: Food Processor
11 x 4 inches (29 x 12 cm) Loaf pan, lined with aluminum foil

    

Method
:

    Combine hazelnuts and almonds in a food processor and process until the nuts are finely ground.




    Add chopped dates, cranberries, tart cherries, cocoa powder, ground espresso, and sea salt, pulse and process all the ingredients together until the texture is coarse. Then add the shredded coconut, a quick pulse, and add the vanilla extract, a little water at a time until it reaches a dry but moist dough consistency. Scrape the dough mixture into the lined pan, press evenly with a rubber spatula, and chill for about an hour before serving.

  19. #19
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    Dates!!!
    If you are on a 4+ long ride than put some Peanut Butter in the Date!

    Easy and yummy!

  20. #20
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    Roots Market has some date-coconut bars that are super yummy and have 30g carbs (120 cal.) each. The only ingredients are dates and coconut.

    They also sell some natural energy chunks in various flavors, which are a good alternative to commercial energy bars.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by mooddude View Post
    Dates!!!
    If you are on a 4+ long ride than put some Peanut Butter in the Date!

    Easy and yummy!
    I go with Dried dates & almonds. Easy to throw in snack-size zip lock bags & dates are one of the few dried fruits without any sugar or preservatives added. BJ's has them in bulk
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  22. #22
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    Just put Dates-Coconuts-Favorite Nut (almonds, pistachios, Cashews, hazelnuts,...) in a blender, blend until uniform mix and roll the mixture into a ball - there you made your own Energy bar for far less than it cost to purchase a Bar!! If you want to be creative than roll the ball in shredded coconut - yummy.

  23. #23
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    For me, even more important than cost is the fact that the homemade bars use real food ingredients of my choosing. I generally try to avoid processed/refined foods and refined sugar and corn syrup. Most commercial energy bars are just expensive candy bars or chemical brownies with some brown rice added, and the energy chews are just over-priced candy.

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