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  1. #1
    Smarter Than He Looks
    Reputation: Sinker's Avatar
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    The older I get,

    the quicker I lose fitness!

    I'm 50 and have been riding for about three years. I'm not very fast, but have no trouble riding 10-15 miles of local rolling singletrack. This summer I started running a couple of mornings each week in addition to a weekly group ride and maybe one or two other mtn or road rides.

    Three weeks ago I went down with a flair-up of an existing back problem. Through rest and PT I'm finally back to feeling fine so I went for a trail ride this afternoon. MAN, I was sucking air and my legs were weak! Trying to climb, I almost felt like I had never ridden before. Pretty discouraging.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
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    Not to worry. Give yourself a few weeks and you should be fine. I find that sometimes it is a psychological factor. Either that or I get excited to be back on my bike and I go too hard at the beginning. Good luck.

  3. #3
    LMN
    LMN is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sinker
    the quicker I lose fitness!

    I'm 50 and have been riding for about three years. I'm not very fast, but have no trouble riding 10-15 miles of local rolling singletrack. This summer I started running a couple of mornings each week in addition to a weekly group ride and maybe one or two other mtn or road rides.

    Three weeks ago I went down with a flair-up of an existing back problem. Through rest and PT I'm finally back to feeling fine so I went for a trail ride this afternoon. MAN, I was sucking air and my legs were weak! Trying to climb, I almost felt like I had never ridden before. Pretty discouraging.
    Happens even when you are younger.

    I was sick almost three weeks ago and I am still sucking wind. Last weekend I went for a group ride and was worked over. This weekend I rode by myself, don't want a repeat of the unpleasantness of the weekend before.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: iWiLRiDe's Avatar
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    the older i get....the slower i get up from crashing. I'm not as resilient as i used to be lol.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sinker
    the quicker I lose fitness!

    I'm 50 and have been riding for about three years. I'm not very fast, but have no trouble riding 10-15 miles of local rolling singletrack. This summer I started running a couple of mornings each week in addition to a weekly group ride and maybe one or two other mtn or road rides.

    Three weeks ago I went down with a flair-up of an existing back problem. Through rest and PT I'm finally back to feeling fine so I went for a trail ride this afternoon. MAN, I was sucking air and my legs were weak! Trying to climb, I almost felt like I had never ridden before. Pretty discouraging.
    Yeah, don't waste one more moment worrying about it.

    Get on the bike and have fun riding. Every weekend at the moment I ride with people a lot more experienced, fitter and faster and they mentally smash me. Not intentionally.
    They are good people.

    It's good (and not good) watching them disappear from view in about 3 minutes.
    It is discouraging to see how low my level is compared to theirs.

    BUT... now I can ride hills I could not even look at four months ago.
    Oh.... I'm 52, been riding about 18 months.

    It'll come. Just takes a while to see it sometimes.

    Cheers

  6. #6
    ups and downs
    Reputation: rockyuphill's Avatar
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    In the past month of monsoons there have not been many riding days that wouldn't have involved wearing SCUBA gear. On the days I got out the wind suckage was bad on climbs. The nice thing is that if you were in shape before stopping, it only takes a couple of weeks of riding to get it back. I'm 54, and I find it is a bit more work to get it back in the post 50's than in younger days, but the same principle seems to apply.

    You want to avoid trying to get back on the bike and matching your best time before you pressed pause, just go out and ride and give it a couple of weeks to come back. You're more likely to pull, pop or burst something if you try to get back out and match your best ride speed right away.
    I'm a member of NSMBA and IMBA Canada

  7. #7
    Giant Anthem
    Reputation: 2fst4u's Avatar
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    Yep, took 3 weeks off cause of new house little projects and my first ride back was a nightmare-it was my usual 2 laps at a local race course but I was slow and sore the next few days. It's taken me awhile to build back to some respectable form (nothing near my race form in mid october)
    Racing and Training Blog
    http://dirtandgears.blogspot.com/

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