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  1. #1
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    Non-cycling home exercises that are most effective?

    I haven't ridden consistently for the last year but a friend just started a summer race series and I'd like to join him (and hopefully be competitive). With my work schedule I can only fit in 1 or 2 rides over the weekend but have time on weekday evenings to workout at home. I have a road bike and rollers, but I usually get bored of that. This week I started doing jump rope and burpees. Have you guys had any success getting in shape doing stuff like that? Or should I just suck it up and use the rollers? I can't do intervals on it quite like a trainer, but it's good for base miles.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    lgh
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    If you want to get good at riding the bike, you have to ride the bike. The other stuff might make you feel/look good or help you prevent/correct muscle imbalances but is secondary to riding.

    Larry

  3. #3
    spec4life???..smh...
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    If you want to get faster on the bike you need to get on those rollers. The best thing to do both not to get bored and get the best fitness from limited time is to just do high intensity intervals for just an hour two days a week. then get in your 2 couple hour rides on the weekend. Try reading the time crunched cyclist.

  4. #4
    Zero Miles from Myself
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    get you a trainer and some slicks and sign up for Cyclo-Club. $27 a month, cancel anytime. It works and Graeme has many workouts that you can down load that come with the membership that DO NOT need a bike ... can be done off the bike and with limited "tools". They can even be done in your office thru the day.

    If the club is not good for you, order some of the products from Cyclo-Core Training. Hit 30 sessions will crush you into shape if you have a trainer. And also Lots of Plans and programs and single sessions for core strength and on the bike stuff too.

    I have used Cyclo-Club in the past ... it works !!

    Might also want to check out:
    Bike James
    MTB Strength Training Systems
    or
    Better Rider

    For tips, tricks and plans. I have read a bit of these but never really messed much with them ... so no experience with these.

  5. #5
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    This question comes up all the time. Can you get in shape for riding without riding the bike? Of course you can. Will you be able to keep up with people that ride all the time? Maybe but probably not.

    A fit guy that doesn't ride much will most likely get dropped by slightly out of shape people that ride all the time. If you asked them to do burpess or chin ups or jump rope then you would win. The only thing they're good at is riding a bike.

    I would say try a home workout program like P90X, Insanity, Asylum and do at least three rides every week. Two of the rides have to be hard and one should be an easy spin. You could even do warm ups/cool downs on the rollers before/after your dvd workouts.

    Once you ride/race you'll know immediately how you stack up against your competition. If it's a Sport class race you might be able to hang in there if you're very fit with limited riding. If you're trying to ride with Experts you'll get dropped in the first minute and never see them again.

  6. #6
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    I have raced for years and used to train alot. Not anymore. I simply ride my bike for the fun of it. But, I will probably race some time again this summer. The only training I do: 100 yards sprints on foot. Give it everything I have for 100 yards then walk back. do it again, 6 or 7 times. Your lungs burn like crazy and if you really give it everything you've got each time, you'll feel the burn during the next few days. I do this no more than once a week. The only other thing I do is kettlebell swings in my backyard, with a 16kg and a 24kg kettlebell. You don't have to do those for long before you just can't do it no more. The most important part: recuperation and sleep. I'll see how it goes...

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by trip221 View Post
    Or should I just suck it up and use the rollers?
    Yes.

    I guess it's all about how much performance you want, where you are and where you want to be relative to the group.

    Last year I won our local "B" group and moved up to the As in our weekly series. I had to start preparing in January to perform like this in July, spending A LOT of time on the bike and doing supplemental core work and such.

    I don't possess the aerobic capability to go jump rope and do few burpees and do well in a bike race. Unless I just did the "C"/beginner group.
    Head Coach, Ben Lomond HS MTB Team
    www.utahmtb.org
    Cycling Team and local Club:
    http://www.roostersbikersedge.com/

  8. #8
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    I'll just have to dust off the rollers I guess. If I take it seriously enough this year maybe I'll invest in a good trainer at the end of the year.

    I don't know how you guys find time to train between work, family, house, etc, but I'll just have to make it work. Maybe when I come in last the first race my wife will understand I need more time to ride.

  9. #9
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    I doubt you'll come in last. The most important thing is to have fun. The second thing is mental. A positive mental attitude can make up for a lack of training.

  10. #10
    Zero Miles from Myself
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    ^^^ +1

  11. #11
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    There are plenty of things you can do besides sitting on those rollers. Like was mentioned above, a kettlebell can get you a great functional workout in a short period of time. And in doing that sort of thing, you gain strength and endurance while improving movement patterns (if you're doing them right). Great gains can be made off the bike as long as you're not already an expert / pro rider. Even then, the right exercises can be helpful.

  12. #12
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    As stated above, a positive outlook can make up for a lot of things. I used to race motocross for a lot of years and my dad always told me before every race, "Positive thoughts breed positive results. Have fun." In my opinion, some of the best advice I have ever received, and not just in racing. This is true in almost every aspect of life.

  13. #13
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    If you don't have much time, I recommend picking up "The Time Crunched Cyclist" by Chris Carmichael. It's usually two workouts during the week (best done on an indoor trainer or rollers) and two rides on the weekend.

  14. #14
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    Lots of great suggestions here. You can do a version of squats by pretending to slowly sit in a chair with your back against the wall. I use rollers as a max-resistance low-rpm kind of exercise, not an endurance exercise. But that's me.

    IMHO, the Carmichael book has been replaced by Joe Friel's work. Just reduce the time and increase the intensity. IMHO, Carmichael's background leaves much to be desired too. PM me if you want more on Carmichael's shady past.

  15. #15
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    good excercises to compliment riding are: squats, lunges, calf raises, ab work (crunches and planks), and good mornings for your lower back. these will help with boh strength and endurance.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrm1 View Post
    get you a trainer and some slicks and sign up for Cyclo-Club. $27 a month, cancel anytime. It works and Graeme has many workouts that you can down load that come with the membership that DO NOT need a bike ... can be done off the bike and with limited "tools". They can even be done in your office thru the day.

    If the club is not good for you, order some of the products from Cyclo-Core Training. Hit 30 sessions will crush you into shape if you have a trainer. And also Lots of Plans and programs and single sessions for core strength and on the bike stuff too.

    I have used Cyclo-Club in the past ... it works !!

    Might also want to check out:
    Bike James
    MTB Strength Training Systems
    or
    Better Rider

    For tips, tricks and plans. I have read a bit of these but never really messed much with them ... so no experience with these.
    I started the MTB strength training at home program that James Wilson offers. I have only done it for about 3 days, but let me tell you that if anyone says that body weight exercises don't do anything for you obviously has never really tried a full workout. After doing these basic workouts I find myself sore the next day and sweating my a$$ off when I complete the day's workout. I recommend trying it if you are crunched for time or don't want to go to they gym. Takes between 30 and 45 minutes to do the whole workout.

  17. #17
    Registered Dietitian
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    Deadlifts for posterior kinetic chain to address quad-dominance from only cycling.

    Dips, pullups for upper body to stabilize shoulder joint.

    Assorted planks, bridges (I love gymnast's bridges) for core strength and flexibility.

    Light stretching.

    All done as SUPPLEMENTARY work to riding, which should comprise the vast majority of training hours.

    This time of year, I spend 2-ish hours/week on the above and ride 8-12 hours/week.
    Registered Dietitian, Cycling Coach, E3: Elite Human Performance

    www.e3ehp.com

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by trip221 View Post
    I'll just have to dust off the rollers I guess. If I take it seriously enough this year maybe I'll invest in a good trainer at the end of the year.

    I don't know how you guys find time to train between work, family, house, etc, but I'll just have to make it work. Maybe when I come in last the first race my wife will understand I need more time to ride.
    I agree that you will probably do better than you think.

    I also have a demanding job, a wife (who is not so demanding), and two kids (endlessly demanding). I'm no pro, but I ride to work, ride trails 3-4 hours on the weekend and run during the week (X2). I have to do my running at night after the kids go to sleep so as to be a participating member of the household! But its really nice to run at night these days – too hot during the day.

    About 3 times a week I also do some strengthening work. This will not impact endurance as others noted, but there is value to having some strength to pull you through tough situations. I don’t do anything fancy: push ups (regular and “spiderman” for obliques), 20lb barbell curls and related, stomach work (leg lifts and the like). I do feel this extra strength makes a difference for me on the trail, but not in terms of endurance. I do these things when I can fit them in – even at lunchtime. It doesn’t take long, but it is helpful. I'm not that consistent, but its enough.

    Another strategy to consider if you are preparing for a race is interval training. There are many ways to do it (just do a search), but it is a very efficient way to build up endurance, especially if you are strapped for time.

    Swimming also can help with endurance and doesn’t take that long. 20-40 minutes of consistent swimming is a pretty serious workout!

    Personally, the idea of clocking time on a trainer sounds terribly boring.

    I just signed up for a run next week and I haven’t been running for over two weeks now (hurt my toe). But I’m just out for some fun. I know I can run 5k, so it’ll just be a nice time to be out with other people. Its all about having fun!!

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