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  1. #1
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    need seat advice

    I currently have an SLR XP Kevlar on my Scott Scale 20. I end up having a painful pressure point on my sit bones in the ol' rear end. Im very thin about 155 6'1" so I imagine I have less natural padding down there. I have done dome winter riding with two layers and the double padding doesnt help at all. What about the Flow saddles? I have never had a problem with numbness, but will that design relieve any of the pressure issues im having? I would like to stay generally light as its my xc race bike and would like to spend less than $200.

    Thanks for any advice!
    2009 Scott Scale 20
    2005 S-works Epic

  2. #2
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    Get a gel, comfort orientated, saddle.

  3. #3
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    I need an xc race saddle. Do you consider the gel flo's comfort orientated?
    2009 Scott Scale 20
    2005 S-works Epic

  4. #4
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    jfair...I would suggest going to your local treck dealer and seeing if they have the bontrager seat fitment bench deal. Sounds like to me you just have the wrong width and that will tell you where the pressure is falling (i.e. where your sit bones are sitting) and it will give you a range of widths. Sometimes your spot on an exact size sometimes you're between 2 sizes but I would take that step first then pick up a cheap bontrager seat in the given size and ride it a few times and see how it works for you.

    FDC
    '99 GT Aggressor 1x9 XT shadow, race face ride XC and Judy TT's and Panaracer XC pro

    '09 Fisher Paragon 29'er

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by FiveDogCycling
    jfair...I would suggest going to your local treck dealer and seeing if they have the bontrager seat fitment bench deal. Sounds like to me you just have the wrong width and that will tell you where the pressure is falling (i.e. where your sit bones are sitting) and it will give you a range of widths. Sometimes your spot on an exact size sometimes you're between 2 sizes but I would take that step first then pick up a cheap bontrager seat in the given size and ride it a few times and see how it works for you.

    FDC
    He's on a Scott, why would he want to introduce cancer on it with a Bontrager saddle? I like the Selle San Marco Aspide myself, but everybody is different.

  6. #6
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    I know you wanted to stay under $200, but competitivecyclist.com has saddle demo program the might be the right ticket. For about $200 they send you a massive box of saddles, you ride them for a week or so, keep the one that works best and send the rest back.

    On a side note... I'm skinny and tried the SLR - it had one good spot for me, so I ended up going back to my trusty Flite. I've heard the Flite tends to work better for skinny guys.

  7. #7
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    try WTB Rocket V. Is great saddle all around.
    Originally Posted by XC62701
    Agreed...make it longer. I want to know death is an option

  8. #8
    I Tried Them ALL... Moderator
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    I have ridden a road century on Selle Italia SLR, without discomfort...BARELY. I suggest the 248g Fizik Gobi XM marathon saddle...the finest, most comfortable XC saddle ever made. Don't be fooled by the slim "Alligator jaw" climbing nose...its so ergonomically perfect its surreal:

    "The mind will quit....well before the body does"

  9. #9
    cougarbait
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    I have good luck with my SLR XC gel flow. 5'9, 120lbs
    09AS-Rsl/09Six

  10. #10
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    I'm 6' and weigh 148, so pretty close to your size. I prefer the specialized toupe. I used the phenom for a little bit but felt like it was less forgiving than the toupe. My width is 143.

    The problem is, no matter what size you are your body can be different from one person to the next. ex a big 225# guy might have narrow sit bones and need a narrow saddle and you only being 155 might have wider sit bones and need a 145. Your best bet is to go to a Trek or Specialized dealer and sit on the fit device to get a good ballpark of what you are looking for. From there you can check out the different widths of saddles and eventually find one that fits.

    The good news with the Bontrager is that it has a 90 day comfort guarantee so if for any reason you don't like it take it back with the receipt and return it no questions asked. Not sure about the specialized but they are good saddles.

  11. #11
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    I'm with Slim and FiveDog, it seems primarily like an issue of width. The SLR shape works well for me - it's a good width, has a wide nose and a flat profile. The outline shape is good and doesn't hit me anywhere it shouldn't. I have a Specialized Toupe 135 on my road bike which works well. I'm 6'1 x 165# and fit best on a 135 width, my wife who is way smaller than I am likes a 143 width. Your skeleton is your skeleton and that's going to be the biggest factor in which saddle works best. If you are a "sit in one place" kind of guy a saddle with a curved profile might be better. I have a tendency to use all of the real estate on a saddle so the flat profile works for me. But Specialized and Trek dealers have the tools to measure your sit bones - you are under no obligation to buy a Specialized or Bonti saddle if there are preferable alternates.

  12. #12
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    Thanks!! all great info! I def need to figure out what width is right for me. Ive never measured checked or even cared before lol. I will start there!

    Generally speaking, your sit bones should, stupid question but, sit on TOP of the rear part of the saddle? What should be where for a generally correct fit? I think my current slr is too narrow and im sitting a little forward on it. Causing kind of an outward pressure on the sit bones. Just a guess....
    2009 Scott Scale 20
    2005 S-works Epic

  13. #13
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    You'd be surprised that some really thinsaddles are actually quite comfortable, do what others are saying and go to a bike shop with Trek or Specialized and see what they can do to find you something that will fit to your booty.

  14. #14
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    My advice is to demo as many saddles as possible, focusing on some tried and true ones that are very popular. I did some research a little more than a year ago on popular saddles, then tried out a few out on demo, and finally bought one that has been great for me: the WTB Rocket V. I have done a 10 hour ride on it, a 2 day, 24 hour event, and multiple 3+ hour rides.

    I then tried to find a saddle for my road bike, riding 12 different saddles from multiple companies--on demo through the Competitive Cyclist demo program--and finally said screw it the WTB Rocket V works best for me so I got another one and put in on my road bike.

    When I did my research--on the endurance racing forum--some of the very popular saddles that kept coming up again and again were the following:

    WTB Rocket V
    WTB Laser
    Fizik Gobi (mentioned above)
    Selle San Marco
    A Brooks saddle (I forget which one)

    Go to the Competitive Cyclist website and check out their demo program. You'd get to ride something like 12 saddles. And part of the money you pay goes toward your purchase is you purchase one. I ended up wanting the Rocket V--which wasn't a part of their road saddle program--and they gave me the credit anyway.

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