Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: Max Heart Rate?

  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    129

    Max Heart Rate?

    I did a VO2 Max test today. Everything was pretty good, given my age and the training I've been doing, but the "maximum heart rate" number (154bpm) was 19 bpm below what my Garmin consistently shows as being my maximum (173bpm) when I'm out on the bike! The standard MaxHR calculators would more or less agree with the Garmin (I'm 48).
    I asked the tester (who is well respected here in Ireland) about the difference and he assures me that his equipment is accurate and that he has come across this discrepency with Garmin HRMs before. He didn't seem to think that 154bpm seemed unusually low given that I'm a pretty fit 48 year old!
    The Lactate Threshold figure from the test is also lower than I would have expected!
    Obviously this make it difficult to implement the training zone schedules that he has given me unless I buy a new HRM which I suspect may give me the same results as the Garmin!
    Any thoughts would be appreciated!

  2. #2
    Photog Cyclist.
    Reputation: 23mjm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    401
    I would say borrow a HR monitor from a friend and try it out. Do you know anyone who has a Polar or some other? You could look around and find a inexpensive one on sale to check. But i really doudt that the Garmin would be that far off if any. 154 really seam low. The not so accurate, but in the ball park 220-age gives 172 bpm.
    [SIZE="4"]We ride and never worry about the fall
    I guess that's just the cowboy in us all
    [/SIZE][SIZE="2"](Tim Mcgraw)[/SIZE]

  3. #3
    Loving Life
    Reputation: Trev's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    326
    Quote Originally Posted by 23mjm
    I would say borrow a HR monitor from a friend and try it out. Do you know anyone who has a Polar or some other? You could look around and find a inexpensive one on sale to check. But i really doudt that the Garmin would be that far off if any. 154 really seam low. The not so accurate, but in the ball park 220-age gives 172 bpm.
    Yah I agree, even though using your age for max HR is not that accurate, given that are a fit individual your should actuall be a little higher, not lower

  4. #4
    Giant Anthem
    Reputation: 2fst4u's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    701
    I've used several different models of heart rate models with my clients over the last 2 years-even the cheap ones give almost exactly the same readings as my nice polar unit. Sounds to me like the test wasn't as hard as when you are out on the bike. How was the test conducted, how long was it, was the test on a trainer? I know for me that I have a very hard time matching my trainer heart rate to a real ride.
    Racing and Training Blog
    http://dirtandgears.blogspot.com/

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    129
    Quote Originally Posted by 2fst4u
    Sounds to me like the test wasn't as hard as when you are out on the bike. How was the test conducted, how long was it, was the test on a trainer? I know for me that I have a very hard time matching my trainer heart rate to a real ride.
    I'm thinking the same thing myself! The test was on an exercise bike and took about 15 minutes. I'm guessing that I wasn't sufficiently warmed up to give my maximum. I do notice that when we're out in the hills and we do a stiff climb very early in the ride I can feel very close to maximum effort but my heart rate on the Garmin will only be in the mid 150s.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    11,271
    Quote Originally Posted by RichardL
    I'm thinking the same thing myself! The test was on an exercise bike and took about 15 minutes. I'm guessing that I wasn't sufficiently warmed up to give my maximum. I do notice that when we're out in the hills and we do a stiff climb very early in the ride I can feel very close to maximum effort but my heart rate on the Garmin will only be in the mid 150s.

    Another concept on an exercise or a road bike you won't tend to get the really sharp spikes in heart rate, that you will get say popping over top of a ledge at the top of a long climb, you will be waay of into anaerobic output levels...

    So take your Garmin HR trend lop of any peak that is say less than 30 secs long, no what is your max heart rate.

  7. #7
    No. Just No. Moderator
    Reputation: Circlip's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    4,642
    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott
    Another concept on an exercise or a road bike you won't tend to get the really sharp spikes in heart rate, that you will get say popping over top of a ledge at the top of a long climb, you will be waay of into anaerobic output levels...
    ???

    You need better roads.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    11,271
    Quote Originally Posted by Circlip
    ???

    You need better roads.

    Long smooth road up or down hit about 85% of Max heart rate and hold, yeah if some one passes you and you go....

    Exercise bike same thing....

    Long steep hill with a ledge at the top and some rocks for those who don't commit, You really don't see a difference.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: millennium's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    332
    Quote Originally Posted by RichardL
    I'm thinking the same thing myself! The test was on an exercise bike and took about 15 minutes. I'm guessing that I wasn't sufficiently warmed up to give my maximum. I do notice that when we're out in the hills and we do a stiff climb very early in the ride I can feel very close to maximum effort but my heart rate on the Garmin will only be in the mid 150s.
    First of all, max HR is really not important or useful--in my experience, some of my clients with the best fitness had the lowest max HR. If he gave you HR at threshold (and you trust that number), you can/should base HR training zones on HR at threshold anyway.

    But, to answer your question, my experience with testing is that you have to really try to spike your HR during such a test, by encouraging the pupil a lot and by demanding a "sprint" after the pupil is already saying or showing that they cannot pedal any more. That sprint will spike HR by 5-10 beats. Also, HR rising lags behind the effort itself, so you need to be at maximum effort (or very close) for a while (and then do a long sprint) in order to see maximum HR. My suspicion is that your HR never got to maximum during your test.
    -

    Addictive website!

    TwoWheelTweets.com

    All of cycling's twitter tweets in one place!

    -

  10. #10
    .
    Reputation: nomit's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    1,117
    did you take a couple days off leading up to the test? or was it train-train-train-v02 test?

    i find if i train hard for a couple days straight and then hop on a stationary bike, i can't get my HR much higher than ~155, despite feeling like i'm giving it my all (pool of sweat, legs on fire...etc). and i've tested my LTHR at 173 outdoors.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    160
    Riding indoors is completely different than riding outdoors. Everyone is different, but many people see a 10-15 bpm loss for the same RPE riding indoors on a trainer versus outdoors on the road; even more so if during a race.

    Context is everything. Being indoors on an unfamiliar exercise bike is far from being outside, on your own bike, in the heat of a race. It also sounds like you weren't sufficiently warmed up. The best indicator of performance is performance. This is why in recent years the popularity and validity of field tests has increased against lab tests.

    In any case, I would trust your Garmin.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •