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  1. #1
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    LeMond Revolution trainer or HTFU and keep riding outdoors?

    My schedule has enough flexibility that I can ride any time of the day. With winter coming up I need to decide if getting the likes of a LeMond Revolution trainer is "worth it". A local seller has a barely-used one for $400. I don't want to turn into the guy with an expensive trainer not being used.

    Local temps can get pretty nasty but for the most part riding in 45 degree is tolerable. I have a CX bike. A ss 29er rigid. And lots of good clothing.

    If you've been in my shoes would you get the nice indoor trainer or just use my schedule's flexibility and cycling equipment investment (bikes, clothing) to grin and bear it by riding outdoors.

  2. #2
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    What part of the country?

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    Boise, Idaho. We have deserts about 45 minutes away and if the sun comes out it's a dry winter air in the valley.

    Quote Originally Posted by Iowagriz View Post
    What part of the country?

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  4. #4
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    I say buy a less expensive trainer and ride outside. A $100 set of rollers from Performance will get you through the winter just fine. If you have daytime temps of 45F you are lucky. That's fairly nice in the winter. My comfort limit seems to be about 25F and some people think that is warm. I know that by the time winter really sets in I will be dreaming of 45F.

  5. #5
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    Agree with above. Get yourself some winter cycling shoes and find some gravel roads (for better traction). Also ride the MTB, as the slower speeds will help reduce the wind chill and help with warmth. I've been to Boise a few times, seems like you could find some good stuff with less snow and less traffic south of town?

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    Great advice!

  7. #7
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    Goin against the grain here. My trainer sessions tend to be far more an intense workout that trail rides, and it is easier to focus on specific workouts. I'd buy the trainer.

  8. #8
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    I got a trainer last winter. I haven't used it much since the weather opened up in the spring, but when things get nasty again, I imagine I'll be back at it.

    IMO, part of training well is removing obstacles to training well. If the crappy weather where you are is an obstacle, a trainer is worth a try.

    I have good clothing too, and a milder winter than you. (Seattle, WA.) But I'd rather ride my trainer than ride outside when it's dark and raining. Do your homework on that specific model, and give a trainer a shot.

    I've worked out on computrainers. I think power is a pretty cool feature. I don't know if you have a power meter on one of your bikes. I don't, so if I didn't train with power on a computrainer, I'd never train with power.
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  9. #9
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    I live in Ogden, Utah which is colder than Boise, and I ride outside quite a bit. But the trainer is still necessary for winter riding over here, especially when I can't get a ride in during the day because of snow or temps below 30 degrees.

    But looking at my winter training calendar, I rode 6 days a week and only 1 day would be on the trainer (my job lets me ride during the day as well). Last winter was pretty mild. Some days were better for winter hiking or XC ski. Maybe you could hit up Bogus mountain on the weekends for some skate ski action.

    I don't know if I'm a fan of that trainer though. It seems that it's pretty noisy and pretty heavy to lug around for races. I also have a PowerTap on my RB and it doesn't work with the Revolution. But they say the road feel on that trainer is phenomenal due to its huge flywheel.
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  10. #10
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    trainer

    I have a compuserve racermate trainer and it works well.Turn on the music,tv,and fan and its not hard to get quality workout in.1-2 hours is my max though.Nice to compare sessions since there are no varibles with weather or wind.You can make ur own course or ride known one already in the machine.I have a model that is over 15 years old,it uses the old nintendo console,and still going strong with no issues.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by AZ.MTNS View Post
    Goin against the grain here. My trainer sessions tend to be far more an intense workout that trail rides, and it is easier to focus on specific workouts. I'd buy the trainer.
    Further, buy THAT trainer. It is by far the closest thing to riding a bike outside (resistance feel and inertia) that I've found.

    I did 2 x 20s on mine this AM, on my MTB as my road bike is in the shop. This trainer is worth its weight in gold if you can't ride outdoors (and with a 15-month-old, I often can't).

    I do any interval less than 1.5 hours indoors as it's just such a more stable, controlled environment.
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poncharelli View Post
    I don't know if I'm a fan of that trainer though. It seems that it's pretty noisy and pretty heavy to lug around for races. I also have a PowerTap on my RB and it doesn't work with the Revolution. But they say the road feel on that trainer is phenomenal due to its huge flywheel.
    It's louder than most (especially at high speeds), so I have wireless headphones.

    I have brought it to races, it's not that heavy. If I had to carry it a long way from the car I wouldn't bother. I prefer to warm up on a real hill anyway.

    I have the Power Pilot head unit that goes with it. I use a PowerTap outdoors. They have a very similar "feel" for a given wattage, enough so that I use the same wattages for intervals indoors or out.

    It's just so much easier to do them indoors for hard intervals - no need to worry about traffic, stoplights, wind, terrain - just pedal hard and focus on the hurting
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by tommyrod74 View Post
    It's louder than most (especially at high speeds), so I have wireless headphones.

    I have brought it to races, it's not that heavy. If I had to carry it a long way from the car I wouldn't bother. I prefer to warm up on a real hill anyway.

    I have the Power Pilot head unit that goes with it. I use a PowerTap outdoors. They have a very similar "feel" for a given wattage, enough so that I use the same wattages for intervals indoors or out.

    It's just so much easier to do them indoors for hard intervals - no need to worry about traffic, stoplights, wind, terrain - just pedal hard and focus on the hurting
    Just curious, does it work with different bikes? 26er, 29er? At least no worries with nobby tires.
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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poncharelli View Post
    Just curious, does it work with different bikes? 26er, 29er? At least no worries with nobby tires.
    Yep. If doing long rides on a 29er on the trainer you could throw a road front wheel on the bike to lower the front end slightly (so it's like riding on level ground), but for 2 x 20s this morning I didn't bother and it wasn't an issue. Like being on a 2-3% incline or so, not really noticable in the saddle.

    The only real issue was my gearing. The 40t big ring (coupled with the 12x27 cassette) made me have to spin 90+ RPM during my intervals which isn't my natural cadence for threshold wattage. No big deal, just made me have to focus a bit harder. If I used an MTB on it regularly I'd want a bigger ring so I could stand at lower cadence/higher wattage as well.

    There's a 5mm spacer on the trainer's QR that usually goes outside the bike's rear dropout (for a road frame). You just put it inside the rear dropout for a 135mm spacing (like a MTB frame).
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by tommyrod74 View Post
    Further, buy THAT trainer. It is by far the closest thing to riding a bike outside (resistance feel and inertia) that I've found.

    I did 2 x 20s on mine this AM, on my MTB as my road bike is in the shop. This trainer is worth its weight in gold if you can't ride outdoors (and with a 15-month-old, I often can't).

    I do any interval less than 1.5 hours indoors as it's just such a more stable, controlled environment.
    How loud are the LeMond trainers? That is the worst part of indoor riding for me. They look nice and where I live riding indoors is a necessity in the winter, much as I prefer the outdoors.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmal View Post
    How loud are the LeMond trainers? That is the worst part of indoor riding for me. They look nice and where I live riding indoors is a necessity in the winter, much as I prefer the outdoors.
    Loud enough that I use wireless headphones for intervals Honestly, it rides so smoothly that it's a non-issue for me.

    For some reason, it's a dealbreaker for some. If you have an apartment or condo with thin walls a neighbor might hear it. My 15-month-old sleeps right through it (it's downstairs and her bedroom is upstairs). It's a droning noise, like white noise, kinda like a vacuum cleaner.
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  17. #17
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    I'd buy the trainer and do both. Some days after work you just don't feel like heading outside for a ride. Gearing up, getting ready, possibly getting the bike all dirty and salty is a pain. Much easier to grab a bottle and a pair of shorts, head downstairs, turn the fan on and go. You can watch t.v. or a video. I like to watch football, and do sprints during the commercials or whatever.
    I do get the urge to be outside though, in the fresh air, actually piloting the bike. Obstacles and inclement weather actually make you a better rider, and it really seems to improve my mood and keep the winter blues away. I'd love to only have it get down to 45 degrees here...

  18. #18
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    sorry to hijack- what headphones do you use?

    to stay on topic, i vote for the trainer. its a great tool for doing structured intervals, as long as you're into that kind of thing.

    Quote Originally Posted by tommyrod74 View Post
    Loud enough that I use wireless headphones for intervals Honestly, it rides so smoothly that it's a non-issue for me.
    something about the west coast...it makes me wanna ride

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by uncreative View Post
    sorry to hijack- what headphones do you use?

    to stay on topic, i vote for the trainer. its a great tool for doing structured intervals, as long as you're into that kind of thing.
    Sennheiser HDR120. Work well for the purpose.
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  20. #20
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    Low and behold I was given a large gift certificate to the local Performance Bike shop this week. Thought about the Kurt Kinetic then thought about my weather and current cold weather clothing. Think I'll use the money for other stuff and just ride the SS or HTFU and do longer slower road rides on decent days or make the hour drive to the local deserts where it's always a tad warmer.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by AZ.MTNS View Post
    Goin against the grain here. My trainer sessions tend to be far more an intense workout that trail rides, and it is easier to focus on specific workouts. I'd buy the trainer.
    I agree 100%, but oh how I hate it!!! Know who you are, if you love to train and can stand riding in one place for over a hour - than get a trainer. If you can't stand the thought of being on a bike and not moving - than ride outside.
    I find that doing both in the winter works for me: intense intervals on the trainer; long tempo rides outside. This is what I did in Utah last winter, now that I live in Southern Oregon that has a milder climate - I will probably ride outside more!!!

  22. #22
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    Within 20 minutes on a trainer I feel like I want to kill myself. It doesn't matter if I'm watching something on TV that I'm interested in. Usually tape sports but even then it's just painfully boring. I live in upstate NY so as long as there is not snow on the ground I'll try to get outside until my body freezes. Last year one of my rides was at below zero with the wind chill. I somehow get this euphoric feeling riding in the winter, I feel like I'm accomplishing something because I'm doing something most people aren't.
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  23. #23
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    get a less expensive trainer as others have said. I mean when the weather is really nasty. Sleet and freezing rain for instance, your not gonna wanna ride in that. You can still ride most of the winter. Just have a back up incase the weather really goes to sh!t
    SS ==> Nut up or Shut up!

  24. #24
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    Lemond Revolution - indoor training thoughts

    As with a few of the comments in this thread I agree that if you can stand a trainer then the Lemond revolution or the Wahoo Kickr are great options (see links below). I work mon-Fri, have a family, so getting up and putting in a 2 X 20 tempo workout (without gearing up and all of the prep for outside riding) or interval session are invaluable off season workout options, add a long tempo ride on the weekend, even better.

    Some cannot stand indoor trainers and it DOES take a few sessions to mentally get used to 1 hr or 1.5 hr workouts but getting up at 6am, knocking out a workout, and getting on with your day has worked great for me but again everyones mojo is different!
    The Lemond is LOUD so if noise is an issue or you or you live in an apartment then that has to be factored in. My HT 29er is what I use and so far so good. Best of luck with your choice.


    wahoofitness.com/KICKRPowerTrainer
    lemondrevolution.com

  25. #25
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    Apparently you'll be able to use a 142x12mm rear thru axle mountain bike frame with the Wahoo KICKR trainer.

    "One of our engineers is a mountain bike nut. Heís worked out a kit for 12mm thru axles, but we canít quite pull off 15mmm, just not enough room. We will be offering the kit as an accessory, but not sure exactly when it will be ready." Chip Hawkins, Wahoo

    Wahoo Fitness KICKR now (sorta) available for pre-order | DC Rainmaker

    .

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