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  1. #1
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    Knee injury, safe to train?

    For the new season, I decided to move from eggbeaters to shimano. Big mistake, first ride (after about a 4 week layoff from serious riding) led to severe knee pain. Took another week off, knee seemed fine, but even 10mins on the bike and I can feel the knee going again. For the last few weeks I've been experimenting with cleat angle, saddle height etc. but nothing is working. I'll be moving back to eggbeaters once things stabilize, but I notice at my local gym, on a flat-pedal exercise bike that I can peddle as normal, for a couple hours, with no knee issues whatsoever. The lack of lateral forces (from aggressive bike handling) might be helping as much as the fact that my feel are finding their natural angle, which seems to change depending on load.

    My main question is, if the stationary bike seems OK, can I continue to train on it? Or should I wait for complete healing?

    Also, am thinking Time ATACs might be somewhere between the eggbeaters float and the shimanos durability- any thoughts?

  2. #2
    mutaullyassuredsuffering
    Reputation: used2Bhard's Avatar
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    Both ways

    Quote Originally Posted by Henchman
    For the new season, I decided to move from eggbeaters to shimano. Big mistake, first ride (after about a 4 week layoff from serious riding) led to severe knee pain. Took another week off, knee seemed fine, but even 10mins on the bike and I can feel the knee going again. For the last few weeks I've been experimenting with cleat angle, saddle height etc. but nothing is working. I'll be moving back to eggbeaters once things stabilize, but I notice at my local gym, on a flat-pedal exercise bike that I can peddle as normal, for a couple hours, with no knee issues whatsoever. The lack of lateral forces (from aggressive bike handling) might be helping as much as the fact that my feel are finding their natural angle, which seems to change depending on load.

    My main question is, if the stationary bike seems OK, can I continue to train on it? Or should I wait for complete healing?

    Also, am thinking Time ATACs might be somewhere between the eggbeaters float and the shimanos durability- any thoughts?
    I would just stick with what your body knows and go back to beaters. If you can ride the stationary without pain I'd keep doing that. Put the Shimano's on ebay and forget about them. Float/knee issues are nothing to screw with given the high volume we racer types hammer out.

    I've managed to hose myself 3 times by messing with the float. I have found that I can reduce the amount of float I need by eliminating some of my pronation through using the Specialized varis inserts in my shoes. After running them I can keep my heels from whacking my chainstays now.

    Basically I've learned that my knees are sensistive to any change in shoes, pedals, or cleats, and I cannot mess aorund with different combinations if I want to stay healthy.

    All my issues popped out during long rides, on equipment that caused me no problems during training rides. After 6ish hours in the saddle they reared their ugly heads.

    1) First time was a move from shimano to exustar. I spend 3 months nursing a inflamed IT band. Pedal didn't have enough float. Ebay'ed them and got eggbeaters
    2) Inflamed my ligaments at a 125 miler by having too much float with an old worn out pair of shoes, that I decided to run last minute due to the hike-a-bike quantity. That took a month to go away. Threw those shoes away.
    3) Inflamed ligaments in other knee by running a newish pair of shoes at a 24 hour that had too thick of a sole and didn't give any float to my left foot. That one is still bugging me 6 weeks later. I ground the sole down a bit with a belt sander and now life is good.

    Through each of these times it was a change in pedals or shoes, that I immedeately reversed. Each time I took 1 week off, went easy for the next 2 weeks, and by the fourth week I could ride with just an occasional twitch of pain. I iced me knees every night for a month as well.


    Good luck. You'll get over it soon enough.
    Free will is an illusion, people will always choose the perceived path of greatest pleasure.

  3. #3
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    many mtb have setback seatpost, as the farther back your saddle the less pressure under your knee cap......mtber usually don't sit back on their seat in perfect position like roadies....b/c ur in/out of the saddle so much.....

  4. #4
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    Couple pieces of advice:

    -Pain is a good thing. It tells you went not to do something, or to take a rest. Listen to it. Right now it's telling you Shimano pedals are not compatible.
    -Ice as often as possible. Ice at work if you can. Really helps accelerate healing.
    -If pain persist, see a sports medicine type doctor. They see all sorts of injuries and recognize potential cures right away; there's a chance you have pain to a unrelated issue (muscle imbalance, tendonitis, etc.).

    Ponch
    Head Coach, Ben Lomond HS MTB Team
    www.utahmtb.org
    Cycling Team and local Club:
    http://www.roostersbikersedge.com/

  5. #5
    LMN
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    Take a break to let things heal. Then slowly work your way back.

    I am a big fan of high frequency low volume. Do 5 rides a week but keep them to 30 minutes. Overtime slowly increase you ride length.

  6. #6
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    There has been some great advice here.

    I agree that its time for the new pedals to hit the spare parts bin.

    Secondly you need to treat the inflammation as suggested by Ponch (Who is a Fellow I-Cup Racer). use the Acronym PRICE.

    P= Protection. Not really relevant here its more for joint dislocations and skin lacerations

    R = Rest. This means resting the affected area and NOT training through the pain. You might need to crosstrain with swimming or something else that allows your knees to rest. I would start with 5 to 7 days until there is no pain to the touch or while doing normal daily activities. Once you return to activites you need to resist the temptation to return to 2 hour hammer fests. Start with a 30 min easy spin. Then an hour. Take a days off and then add some intensity to a an hour ride. Work your way back up to your usual training hours over the course of a week ot 2. Going from injury to resting to Hammering is a recipe for more injury. Also Ice you knees Post activity for the first week at least.

    I= Ice. As suggested above I would try to ice the affected area 3x per day for 15 or so min. I would also take some N-Saids to combat the inflammation if they are not counter-indicated for some other reason.

    C= Compression. Get and Ace bandage or a simple compression knee brace from walmart and wear it. The compression keep fulid from accumulating and causing more iuflamation and lengthing the healing process. This may or may not be necessary for your situation. You did not mention any swelling, but I would say there is some chance this will help you heal faster and really no reason not to. Use this post activity as well.

    E= Elevation. Ehhh give it a shot if you like. This is more appropriate for injuries with severe swelling.

    I also think that looking at the Varus/Valgus situation of your lower extremities is indicated. A well trained bike fitter (very well trained) can probably tell you what type of feet you have and if a shim or insert could be of value. I have been a little disapointed with the Specialized system, not so much the system, but the people doing the assesments at the stores that I have been to are just not educated enough expalin and impliment the process properly. I think its a great system. A better option is to see if there is a local PT that has experience working with cyclists. There are a couple PT's here in SLC utah that do bike fits and I think this is worth the cost.

    Sorry for the long post.
    Visiting St george/Hurricane? Stay at my vacation rental. Discounts for MTB's

    http://www.vrbo.com/392904

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