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Thread: Intervals

  1. #1
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    Intervals

    I have started doing some interval training this winter and I wanted to get some advice if I am doing it right.

    I use the spin bike at my gym.

    I warm up for 15 min.

    I tighten up the resistance a good bit and then go hard sitting for a minute. Basically, the resistance is such that I am about to die on the last 15 sec.

    Pull the resistance back down and rest of a minute.

    I give the resistance knob three turns and go hard for 30 sec. standing up. I am about to die the last 10 sec.

    Pull the resistance back down and rest for a minute 30sec.

    Repeat the whole thing six times for a total of 12 intervals (not including the warm up).

    Cool down for five minutes.

    After six of these (twelve intervals) I am beat. I know there is no “right” way, but I want to make sure I am not doing anything wrong. I plan to do these once or twice a week and add one cycle a week – so next week I will be at 7 sit down stand up intervals – 14 total.

    Thoughts?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    lgh
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    Approach sounds about right. There are different types of intervals. The different types are for different purposes. ex. sprint, climbing, tt, etc. They vary based on length of effort and recovery. Generally, they are done at an intensity that makes them difficult to complete. Obviously, the intensity is higher for shorter intervals. You seem to be doing that. Try to keep the same intensity level (resistance and RPM) the same for a given interval. Don't puke on the gym equipment.

    Hope this helps.

    Larry

  3. #3
    spec4life???..smh...
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    the general approach is what you are doing - warm up, intervals, cool down. What happens in between the warm up and cool down varies alot. There are longer intervals that seek to stress lactate threshold, short intervals stressing VO2 max and then the shortest and most intense intervals to stress anaerobic systems.

    It seems you are doing the last. Generally you dont start with anaerobic intervals however and instead allow you body to get accustomed to hard efforts gradually before hitting the highest intensity.

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    ^^^ +1

    The Time Crunched Cyclist book has a bunch of interval examples in it which vary for lactate, VO2 max etc. It's like $12 on amazon and a really easy read.

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    Thanks for the responses.

    So, there are basically three types of interval.
    Lacte threshold
    VO2 MAX
    Anaerobic

    What does each interval type session look like? What do each of these do to your body and what part of your riding do they effect?

    Thanks.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by gsheffer View Post
    Thanks for the responses.

    So, there are basically three types of interval.
    Lacte threshold
    VO2 MAX
    Anaerobic
    Most would tell you that you're putting on the icing before the cake is baked. A session dedicated to very short intervals (1 min or even 30 seconds) is usually saved for after you have been doing longer intervals.

    There are lots of different approaches depending on how many hours you train and what your goals are and what your weaknesses are.

    The Time Crunched Cyclist is a good book with lots of detail and is geared towards those of us with less than 8 hours a week to train. That approach is to start with 8 minute intervals, then 10 minute intervals, then move to 3 minute intervals, then over-under intervals where you spend a few minutes above lactate threshold and few minutes below it. Of course its not all intervals - longer less intense rides on weekends at first.

    Joe Friel's Training Bible books are also great references for the science of the body's response to the various intensities. The Training Bible books preach a base period with no intervals and gradually introduces them in later stages of training.

    Yet another approach is to do sweet spot training - a bit below threshold intensity from 20 minutes to an hour in length. Sort of an interval, I guess, but staying below LT the whole time.

    The right recipe depends on how much time you have, how your body responds and what you're training for.

    I think the super short intervals that you're doing are usually done after a couple of months of longer intervals like those described above. They would give you short burst power.

    People do throw in one or two of those fast intervals into an otherwise easier ride early season to keep the muscles remembering how to fire and to keep from putting a gun to their heads doing boring base training for weeks on end.
    Last edited by crashtoomuch; 01-15-2013 at 09:45 PM.

  7. #7
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    What is your training history before this? How long have you been riding? How old are you?

    Latest book by Hunter Allen "Cutting Edge Cycling" has good info in it. Describing (HIT) High Intensity like you are doing versus others

    Try these
    Joe Friel - Intervals, Part 1

    Off this forum
    Base Training or Intervals

    Is base training dead?

  8. #8
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    I agree...

    Quote Originally Posted by crashtoomuch View Post
    Most would tell you that you're putting on the icing before the cake is baked. A session dedicated to very short intervals (1 min or even 30 seconds) is usually saved for after you have been doing longer intervals.

    There are lots of different approaches depending on how many hours you train and what your goals are and what your weaknesses are.

    The Time Crunched Cyclist is a good book with lots of detail and is geared towards those of us with less than 8 hours a week to train. That approach is to start with 8 minute intervals, then 10 minute intervals, then move to 3 minute intervals, then over-under intervals where you spend a few minutes above lactate threshold and few minutes below it. Of course its not all intervals - longer less intense rides on weekends at first.

    Joe Friel's Training Bible books are also great references for the science of the body's response to the various intensities. The Training Bible books preach a base period with no intervals and gradually introduces them in later stages of training.

    Yet another approach is to do sweet spot training - a bit below threshold intensity from 20 minutes to an hour in length. Sort of an interval, I guess, but staying below LT the whole time.

    The right recipe depends on how much time you have, how your body responds and what you're training for.

    I think the super short intervals that you're doing are usually done after a couple of months of longer intervals like those described above. They would give you short burst power.

    People do throw in one or two of those fast intervals into an otherwise easier ride early season to keep the muscles remembering how to fire and to keep from putting a gun to their heads doing boring base training for weeks on end.
    I have to agree with crash, I would start with 10, 15, 20m long working in some type of "base" before doing high intensity. this is what I do during non-competitive season. Then 8 weeks before first race start adding "race like" intensity

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