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  1. #1
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    Increasing Training Hours for Next Season?

    I tried searching for this, and I came up empty.

    So, I am only beginning to think about training for next season as the 2011 season is winding down (~5 races left).

    This year was my first season using a plan (Friel) and I chose 350 hours. I was doing well following the plan until about July. Then vacations, work, life, etc. began to interfere with my routine and I really began slacking. I think burn-out may have been part of this as well.

    At this point, I will probably get to about 300 hours or so, maybe a bit less. Last year, as I said, my training was just riding, so I have no idea how many hours.

    Friel says something like 10% increase in hours from season to season. At this point, I am not sure if I should got for another 350 with the plan on meeting the number, or increase to 400-450 hours with the assumption that things will arise, and I will fall short again.

    By increasing to 450, I will get more time in during the pre-race season (winter/spring) and will have some "cushion" in the summer, when things again get busy.

    Summary:
    1) 2011, planned on 350 hours, will achieve ~300
    2) 2010, increase to 450 hours, or try again to actually reach 350.

  2. #2
    LMN
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    Increasing your hours allows the training stimuli to continue to grow. The increase should be based on what you did not what you planned to do.

    I would keep it at 350 and actually achieve 350. 50 hours doesn't sound like much but if are riding 7 hours a week that it takes 7 weeks to achieve 50 hours. And that is going to have a significant change on your fitness and free time.

    I also find that keeping your goal reasonable makes it easier to achieve it when time is tight. I know for myself if I do a bunch 15 hour weeks in the spring then it seems I will have some 4 or 5 hour weeks later in the year. If restain myself in the sping then I am more consistent throughout the year.
    "The best pace is suicide pace, and today is a good day to die." Steve Prefontaine

  3. #3
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    Training time is more important early in the season while building base. Intensity is more important later in the season. Look at your performance and see if you are tapering off early in the season. Or, are you just doing shorter very high intensity rides? And, are you getting to mid season and trying to work through recovery weeks? Maybe allow a longer recovery time mid season to handle life's challenges. Then after a week or two, you'll be itching for more riding. Re-build some base and work toward a second peak race.
    Oh sh!+ just force upgraded to cat1. Now what?
    Best thing about an ultra marathon? I just get to ride my bike for X hours!

  4. #4
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    increasing hours would be nice, but it can be difficult to fit into life.

    i agree that you should aim for hitting the mark instead of increasing. though you also might be like i am where working to a daily plan doesn't fit well. i think i do better when i don't have a very strict plan and instead just have a rough idea of how many hours i need that week and what my intensity needs are for that time of year. for me it seems that stressing about individual rides/days isn't constructive. i focus on getting into a weekly routine and maintain that till i need to change "phases" (like from base to build or race)
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  5. #5
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    AlliKat, that is kind of what I was thinking. By increasing my hours, I will "front load" my training early in the season, knowing that when race season arrives, there will be a reduction in hours due to random reasons.

    whybother, I am the opposite, I need to have a schedule and a plan, do this on Wednesday for this long, or I can easily come up with something else I would rather be doing.

    That is part of the reason why I am struggling now. My work hours have been inconsistent, somewhere between 9 and 17 hours on a given day. So besides working through my evening training hours, I am not motivated to work out the next morning, or the following evening, as I need that time to "catch up" with other chores, and family.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonw9 View Post
    ...or I can easily come up with something else I would rather be doing.
    this can lead to issues IMO. (burnout, not meeting plan, etc)

    if you aren't doing what you would rather do, it is too much like work!
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  7. #7
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    I get your point, but I don't think anybody has the thought "I would rather be on the trainer" other than maybe while sitting at work, or stuck in traffic.

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    Learn to love the trainer. That is all

  9. #9
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    If you felt like you were burning out at your current load, I do not see how trying to increase the hours would help at all. I would try to stick to the 350.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spinning Lizard View Post
    If you felt like you were burning out at your current load, I do not see how trying to increase the hours would help at all. I would try to stick to the 350.
    Well, I am not sure my burn-out is related to too much training. I mean I WANT to ride my bike more, but work and other issues are what make it difficult to ride.

    I think it would actually be easier to add hours in the winter when I can hop on the trainer. Although I still don't know what my workload is going to be this winter, so this may all be for naught.

  11. #11
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    You need to look at your races in 2011 and where you can improve for 2012. This doesn't need to mean more hours, it could mean that you need to change your training. I would first identify your weeknesses than I think we could help you better.

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