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  1. #1
    Pauly
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    How do you ration your effort ?

    I was unable to finish my last race. It was 24 miles and I know I just went out too fast and held that pace for too long. It was a long race for me in the steep Western North Carolina mountains.

    Very disappointing. I was so glad to get a flat tire and walk out because I would have walked out anyway.

    Is a steady race intensity the way to go? Should I try to ride with the same intensity for the whole race?

    Should I take it easy in the beginning in hopes to pour it on during the last lap, do you think it will make for a better overall time? Maybe I should break out the HRM>

    Whattaya think?

  2. #2
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    Need to ride enough rides that are like the races you are entering....

    Then you know for sure how hard you can go...

    After about 2 hours you will be at a pace that you can hold for 6 to 8 hours....if you havn't already blown up that is.

  3. #3
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    in order to put a finger on how hard you can go you need to do race simulation.

    race simulation is usually on everybody's schedule as their C priority races.

    if you blew up in the race, you are not training hard enough for a long enough period of time. basically since you hadn't pushed that button yet, you didn't know how hard or how long.

    for me, it took me a long time (more than a year) to work through intensity and cramping issues. just when i got that ironed out I broke my neck... hoping that when i get built back up I don't have to re-learn!

    edit: one more thing... never quit, never give in.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pauly F
    Is a steady race intensity the way to go?
    Yes. Even pacing is the fastest strategy. It's complicated a bit by the terrain; you should be working harder on climbs than on descents, but not so hard that you redline.

  5. #5
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    The same thing happened to me my first race. Once you race and ride more and more you have a pretty good idea what speed to keep. if the race is 24mi then your training rides should be 24miles at min

  6. #6
    Pauly
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    Yes, It all makes sense. I just have work to do. Thanks all.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by ptfmb71
    if the race is 24mi then your training rides should be 24miles at min
    Nonsense.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by flargle
    Yes. Even pacing is the fastest strategy. .
    think like a bucket of water you need to sprinkle out the whole race. you don't want to dump it al out at the beginning and then be shaking the bucket for those last drops at the end. you also don't want to save it all and try to dump it all right before you finish.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
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    Race lots. Race often.

    Shortxc. Marathon xc. 24 hour team race. Crits. Time trials. Super century road races.

    All of them have their unique twist.

    I find that the best way to learn them is to do them.

    Last week I did a 150 mile road race. Twice as long as any other race I've done. Just wroteit off as a learning race. My result showed it. Next year I'll do better. Those rolling feed bags are tricky.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pauly F
    Is a steady race intensity the way to go? Should I try to ride with the same intensity for the whole race?
    For 24mi, I would say no. If you are maintaining a steady rate, either you are extremely good (able to do max effort the whole time) or you are not racing hard enough. Although it depends on the course and individual ability. On shorter climbs (where momentum can be used), or maybe on a section of trail that works to your strengths, you should try to put in a hard effort followed by a slight recovery, then maintain.

    Of course you have to know your limits, like when to turn off that hard effort. A heart rate monitor can be helpful, but the best way is just to know from experience.

    You should practice your race pace, and practice going above race pace, but don't do it for 24mi or you'll be exhausted all the time.
    Last edited by rob_co2; 08-11-2010 at 12:27 PM.

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