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  1. #1
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    Heat Stroke and hydration...

    At the end of my race I had to be taken by ambulance to the hospital. I had severe heat stroke and needed to be "iced" to bring my temp down and needed four bags of I V solution.


    I've been racing for several years now without any medical needs after a race (incl. crashes!). Raced yesterday in 91F w/ high humidity. Drank a decent amount before the race, though I did not really get a chance to have a gd brkfst. During the race I drank as usual, even increased it a bit due to the heat, which is a 50/50 gatorade water mix, and had 3 hammergels throughout the race, incl one at the start. After the first lap, which felt great, I started to feel like I needed to thow up, but kept on going. I was pushing real hard and knew I was, but have done so before too without serious consequences (other than cramping and being really tired!) After I crossed the finish line I began to be confused, dizzy, and started to trow up all the gatorade I had drank during the race and a lot came up!!!!


    It seems like I was drinking enough as I there was plenty to come up, but that my body was not absorbing it!! So I am wondering where I went wrong? At this point my theory is that my body was not absorbing the gatorade. Should I drink just water? Drink some other sports drinks (which will have to happen as I can never really drink gatorde again after it coming up like that). Any ideas or input would be greatly appreciated. thnx
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  2. #2
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    I'm Not a Doctor, and this is just my opinion from past experiences, but high sugar drinks like gatorade do not do well in high temp situations, I have much better luck with Hammer Nutrition Endurolytes( which is high mineral and salt content pill) and Elite( which is also an electrolyte liquid you put with your water). maybe give that a try!!

    Best of luck!!

  3. #3
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    Intakeon the course was not the issue.

    All the fancy sports drinks in the world could get you past that heat and humidity. You simply passed the limit at which your body could efficiently shed its heat through respiration and perspiration. You let your core temperature get away from you. The problem was, though, that it happened in the first lap and you didn't even know it. The lack of decent food in a timely fashion before the race was really bad. Huge mistake. You got into stress early and your stomach shut down before it could process any of the goodies you gave it. You pressed hard early on and your temp was out of control THEN and you only toughed it out. Pretty dangerous. You were a cycling tank of gatorade and hammergell until the finish line.
    You sound like an experienced racer so this must have mystified you.
    What you needed to do was dump water ON your body; in your ears, in your helmet vents, back of the neck, soaking your jersey, on your arms, and often. This is where feedzone support is criitical.
    During Floyd Landis' comeback vicotry he used 71 bottles of water in 5.5 hours; a bottle every 5 minutes. Half the time he was poouring it all over himself. I recently ddi an epic 98 mile ride in 105 heat. I felt the stress, big time:
    The hardest ride of my life. Diablo and back at 105.

    Racing takes more than stamina and technique.
    Better planning and less reliance on gutting things out will get you right back in the groove. Good luck..

  4. #4
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    put lemeon in your water.......i heard that once........ wear under armor....it uses your sweat to cool you down.



    o yea and use a camelback (you probly have one)

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Berkeley Mike
    . You got into stress early and your stomach shut down before it could process any of the goodies you gave it. You pressed hard early on and your temp was out of control THEN and you only toughed it out. Pretty dangerous. You were a cycling tank of gatorade and hammergell until the finish line.
    You sound like an experienced racer so this must have mystified you.
    What you needed to do was dump water ON your body; in your ears, in your helmet vents, back of the neck, soaking your jersey, on your arms, and often. This is where feedzone support is criitical.

    I recently ddi an epic 98 mile ride in 105 heat. I felt the stress, big time:
    The hardest ride of my life. Diablo and back at 105.
    Thank you all for all the input. I think on hot racing days I'll race with my camel back with water (maybe lemon, and some sort of electrolites), and will put a bottle of ice water on the bike to spray on if I start heating up too much.

    Berkeley Mike, that sounded like a great challenging ride. In your story you mention Heat stress tablets...can you give me more info on those? thnx
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  6. #6
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    Heat Stress.

    I have used a product from Hammer Nutrition called Endurolytes. I don't even find it on their site. The biggest component in the cap is manganese, and vitamin B-6. I have used it now and again and my guess is that in spite of sweating like a hog I never got to the point where I gave up so much of my electrolytes that I had any cramping. Cooling is another issue altogether. there is a limit to how much you cn col via respiration and natural evaporation.
    I went to the Hammer site and found a really great article on hydration and cooling:
    http://www.hammernutrition.com.au/knowledge.php

    While I imagine that they are invested in selling you something I thought the article hit the main points pretty clearly and was even handed. There was a lot of other stuff on that page, too, about nutrition and stuff whichmight give you a bit of a framework.
    The next challenge you face is finding something to drink and eat that doesn't remind you of throwing up after the race. Start testing foods as soon as possible an integrate them into your workouts, even if they are short.

    A final note or two: I've used Cytomax for quite a while. The only time I felt odd was using Gatorade and I realized it was missing the carbs and the way my body took them in and used them so directly. Also, you might learn a lot by being a Course Marshal. I've done this several times and the most telling thing is to stay in one spot and watch racers pass you on multiple laps. You can actually see the effect of poor hydration and heat on the faces of the racers with each lap. Once you have seen this it is hard to ignore. As a coach and director of a developing High School racing club I have instituted a vigorous program of feed support for our races because teens have little sense of how to take care of themselves and can get themselves into crisis. The change of consciousness which occurs when you dump a bottle of water on an overheating kid is amazing.
    Last edited by Berkeley Mike; 08-02-2006 at 11:24 AM.

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