Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: zgxtreme's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    156

    Gear for Indoor Training

    With a new baby boy close to arriving I see my riding time getting smaller while my desire to fine tune my fitness increases.

    While I may just stick to trail riding over racing; may try a race here and there in 2018, I'm going to pick up a Wahoo KICKR Snap and link up with TrainerRoad.

    For those who hop on a road bike and an indoor trainer, I'm curious if components on the bike have much of an effect on training in an indoor setting. Will I see much of any difference on the trainer with Tiagra over 105, Rival, etc. if anyone has experience in this area?

    Thanks for the insight!

  2. #2
    eri
    eri is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    259
    I would save up and wait for Wahoo to sell refurb kicker, they sell them for $650 including shipping. Get on their email list. The kick needs less calibration because no rear tire.

    I use an old 26" mtb on mine, just take care to perfect the riding position. Spend whatever it takes on a seat.

    As for components... you'll never brake, given erg mode you'll probably never shift, i'd say components are way down the list.
    the truth is always a gift because it offers the recipient of that information the chance to change the outcome - Grace Choi

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: zgxtreme's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    156
    Quote Originally Posted by eri View Post
    I would save up and wait for Wahoo to sell refurb kicker, they sell them for $650 including shipping. Get on their email list. The kick needs less calibration because no rear tire.

    I use an old 26" mtb on mine, just take care to perfect the riding position. Spend whatever it takes on a seat.

    As for components... you'll never brake, given erg mode you'll probably never shift, i'd say components are way down the list.
    Thank you, nice to know I'm looking down the right path. Will also look at the Refurb option as well, thanks for the tip.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    444
    Do you have space for a dedicated bike?

    I have a dedicated old bike set up on Elite Turbo Muin stationary trainer (direct drive - no rear wheel). Thing is crazy silent and I spend some 70-80% of my workout time on the machine due to 2 small kids. This made me pretty competitive last few years once out in nature.

    Old bike essentially is a MTB frame from 1990s with demolished old Shimano 105 shifters and archived cranks - it really does not matter what you have there, as long as contact points (seat, handlebar) are comfortable and properly set up.

    I am saying this as my prep time for workout is like 30 seconds, and I kick one excuse out of way - i just have to sit&start, no setting up bike on trainer time and also no wear and tear on the more expensive bikes I have.

  5. #5
    eri
    eri is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    259
    Other thing about direct drive... I had a road machine and couldn't get it to read over 1000 watts. The rear tire would slip pretty bad above about 650-700, so short high power intervals were frustrating. With the direct drive kickr I'm limited by my legs.

    I've not tried other high end trainers but am sad I didn't buy the kickr a year ago.
    the truth is always a gift because it offers the recipient of that information the chance to change the outcome - Grace Choi

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    307
    I've got a baby due in 3 weeks. This winter I bought a Kickr to use during cold, wet, and Dark winter nights, but also because I knew with a baby coming that close to race season, I would need an easy way to quick fit in training wherever I can. I totally agree with Goran...having a dedicated bike set up on it helps a lot. I just basically have to go down to the basement and turn the tv on and I can ride. I don't need to worry about switching wheels, tweaking derailleurs, etc. My bike is a Chinese carbon frame that my friend gave me for free, a bent front wheel, and then I pieced together a SRAM Apex group to go on it. I probably spent less than $200 on the bike.

    For your other questions...as others have said...components matter very little. As long as it does actually shift, you're good. You're not actually going anywhere, so weight is not a concern. Keep an eye out for used groups, or even older complete bikes that would work.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: zgxtreme's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    156
    Thank you. Yeah it's gonna be a dedicated setup next to the wife's BowFlex MaxTrainer with the ultimate goal of building a gym and home shop in the 4th car garage of our next house.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Posts
    4
    I have a dedicated setup with my roadbike w/ 105s all around (it's not seeing the road much these days) and Wahoo Kickr paired with TrainerRoad - it's fantastic. I definitely recommend the direct drive, despite the higher initial cost.
    Most of the time you can run it in ERG mode which means you don't have to shift, but you still want to maintain basic shifting ability as this is needed to do FTP tests.
    Really though, components on the bike don't matter much for this (maybe seat, pedals and bars for basic fit?) - just ride.

    I run TrainerRoad on computer (you can do your phone, but I like the bigger screen) so I've got the Suunto Movestick Mini dongle for ANT+ connectivity to the Kickr. It works well.
    You may also want to consider a heart rate monitor. I find it useful.

  9. #9
    eri
    eri is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    259
    Quote Originally Posted by zgxtreme View Post
    Thank you. Yeah it's gonna be a dedicated setup next to the wife's BowFlex MaxTrainer with the ultimate goal of building a gym and home shop in the 4th car garage of our next house.
    I have mine on a covered porch. It's high 30s right now and I need 2 fans. Can't imagine using one of these indoors. You'll produce a lot of waste heat!

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: zgxtreme's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    156
    Quote Originally Posted by JimboBoon View Post
    I have a dedicated setup with my roadbike w/ 105s all around (it's not seeing the road much these days) and Wahoo Kickr paired with TrainerRoad - it's fantastic. I definitely recommend the direct drive, despite the higher initial cost.
    Most of the time you can run it in ERG mode which means you don't have to shift, but you still want to maintain basic shifting ability as this is needed to do FTP tests.
    Really though, components on the bike don't matter much for this (maybe seat, pedals and bars for basic fit?) - just ride.

    I run TrainerRoad on computer (you can do your phone, but I like the bigger screen) so I've got the Suunto Movestick Mini dongle for ANT+ connectivity to the Kickr. It works well.
    You may also want to consider a heart rate monitor. I find it useful.
    Thanks for the insight, I'm opening up more to the direct however still leaning Snap simply to help the baby finances more.

    Given the lack of necessity of components I'm looking at lowest level Shimano even if still an 8 speed to try and free up the funding to go direct drive.

    Will swap saddle and use quality pedals due to them being contact points and certainly don't want to try suffering through inadequate equipment there as I know it'd just give me an excuse to avoid the sessions.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    3
    I'll echo what others have said. Components are your least concern, but contact points should be your biggest concern.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: rocketfuel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    143
    Yeah, what they said! I have a ergobike in the cellar, just haveto hop on and ride. It's so much more helpful to be able to ride with little or no setup time.

    Good luck with both baby and training!

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    444
    Direct drives with a large freewheel also give you the most realistic feel.

    Only thing better is rollers, but for me rollers, although fun are difficult for longer sessions and also difficult mentally as sometimes I just need to pedal half asleep to get to normal awake state after 20mins, with rollers that would be more difficult as focus just isn't there.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mnyquist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    380
    I've been using a Kickr with Zwift for the past six months. I'm using my cyclocross bike (just because it's not being used, otherwise). It has Ultegra, but I would just go with Tiagra if I was getting a bike specifically for indoor. Like others, I have two young children and a busy work schedule. I get 90% of my riding done in the basement some weeks. It actually is enjoyable and my fitness is improving. It's worth the investment! Zwift has some great group rides and races.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    24
    I have a Kurt Road machine (which I think can be "smart"/ERG now for reasonable price) - use power meter on bike. Point is this; Kurt Road Machine feels great, smooth, etc... BUT given how I use the bike, I wish I had direct drive. I use my road bike inside and outside through the summer so am changing wheels and cassettes all the time.

    Ironically, if I had a dedicated set up, direct drive WOULD NOT be as big of consideration as I could just throw a trainer tire on the bike and not mess around.

Similar Threads

  1. 24" indoor training tyre
    By Steve-XtC in forum Families and Riding with Kids
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 03-22-2017, 11:30 AM
  2. Indoor Training... WOW
    By nutfluff in forum XC Racing and Training
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 02-22-2016, 09:42 AM
  3. Training Advice Wanted - 6 hr solo w/ limited (mostly indoor) training
    By bopApocalypse in forum Endurance XC Racing
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 02-10-2015, 05:45 PM
  4. 29er - Indoor Training
    By swanny297 in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 08-24-2014, 02:45 PM
  5. Indoor training bike
    By Diaonic in forum Clydesdales/Tall Riders
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 09-30-2013, 06:33 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •