Results 1 to 18 of 18
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    138

    FOX FLOAT iCD riders

    are any of you guys using the new fox iCD setup on your bikes?

    I'm surprised any mention of this system is pre-2013. not a single review or mention of it this year, and now there's a 2014 version out.

    just curious what your experience is like with the float icd fork/shock--especially those of you running FS bikes.

  2. #2
    LMN
    LMN is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    3,392
    I am riding an Orbea Oiz with the iCD. The system works well, but the bike doesn't really need it. Still, I probably lock and unlock the bike more than a 100 times a ride. I use it way more than any other lockout system.
    "The best pace is suicide pace, and today is a good day to die." Steve Prefontaine

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    138
    i read somewhere that there's a spacer you can remove to enable 'the middle' switch option (which you can program with the accessory software).

    can you confirm this?

    gorgeous bike, btw.

  4. #4
    LMN
    LMN is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    3,392
    That would be news to me. I have heard their is suppose to be a middle option available or coming available.

    Thank you. Believe it or not the bike rides better then in it looks.
    "The best pace is suicide pace, and today is a good day to die." Steve Prefontaine

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    138
    ---from the bicycling.com article on iCD:
    "The first iCD bike I rode had an intermediate setting that put the shock in Climb mode and the fork in Descend but data acquisition and athlete feedback suggested that an all-or-nothing approach would be more favorable. As a result the intermediate setting was removed from production units but it can be reactivated via a PC interface and removing a small spacer on the switch. "



    How much does your frame weigh? Seemed suspicious that orbea won't give the weight on their site and even talks about how "feel" is more important. Still, I'd be all over a 29er version of that bike

  6. #6
    LMN
    LMN is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    3,392
    Quote Originally Posted by Jamesm925 View Post

    How much does your frame weigh? Seemed suspicious that orbea won't give the weight on their site and even talks about how "feel" is more important. Still, I'd be all over a 29er version of that bike
    I have never weighed the bare frame. I think the claimed weight is around 1.8kg.

    My bike set up with the iCD, XTR, including wheels, Pro components, comes in at 20 to 22lbs. 20lbs is with single ring, race wheels and tires. 22lb is with a double and durable tires and wheels.

    It is too bad for Orbea that they didn't release the bike in 650b or a 29er version. It kills me to say it but 26inch bikes just don't sell anymore. Still if you get a chance to demo one you should, I have never ridden a bike that comes even close on technical climbs.
    "The best pace is suicide pace, and today is a good day to die." Steve Prefontaine

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    138
    yea, bought mine, then saw the orbea and drooled...but it's not a 29er...so yea.

    lemme know if you figure out anything regarding the 'spacer' in the switch.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    138
    just wanted to share this with you guys, especially those of you that paid attention to the winning bike equipped front and rear with fox's new iCD system:

    FOX FLOAT iCD riders-men-118-603x440.jpg

    pay little attention to all the negative criticism people have been giving this system in the comments on the press-releases. All of these comments just amount to verbal masterbation prompted by a press-release. None of these people that are trashing the icd technology have actually ridden a bike equipped with it.

    I just picked up the 2014 fox float iCD fork/shock kit.

    in no particular order:

    1) the system defaults to 'open' if the battery dies or one of the wires is damaged---not the closed position.

    2) it's completely waterproof and can withstand riding in nasty conditions for days on end.

    3) fox will deny this if you call them (their reps are idiots), but the electronic switch has THREE positions. Default is 2, but the middle position can be enabled by removing a simple stop screw and configuring the buttons using the SM-PCE1 interface. They supply extra decals to relabel the buttons, and the MANUAL even confirms the 3rd/middle switch option.

    I called and inquired about this, and both reps told me it only supports climb/descend modes only.

    THIS is utter bullshit.

    you can program 3 settings in a number of combinations ranging from:

    climb, trail, descend - to - climb, locked rear/open front, descend - to - climb, locked front/open rear, descend.

    In effect, this is a digital version of CTD, with the option to run C/D or C/hardtail mode/D etc.

    Apparently there's not much communication between fox and shimano, b/c the system is fully compatible with shimano's new BTR2 internal seat post mounted battery and the EW-90 junction box and external charger.

    If you add up the cost of a 2014 fox float 32 29 100mm remote adjust fork and the rear shock, you end up with roughly $900 for the fork and $500 for the shock (before taxes). after taxes, you're looking at around $1500 for the setup.


    now add in the electronic components: wiring kit: $150, battery: $100, battery mount: $130, battery charger $100, iCD switch: (???)

    that's another $480, not even account for the iCD switch (lets say that costs $150.

    so now you're at $630 for the electronics and $1500 for the analogue suspension.

    guess what: the digital/icd shock/fork and icd electronics kit is $1999 before tax.

    $630 more than going the analogue remote lever route....

    most people's bikes dont come stock w/ a remote lockout on their shock. so you end up having to buy a new rear shock.

    if your fork didn't come stock w/ a remote lockout, it's around $300+ to upgrade it to a remote lockout--so it'll cost you around $800 to upgrade to a remote lockout front/rear analogue setup.

    or you could just sell your stock setup for around $1,000, and the icd kit will only cost $1000.

    if you're building a new bike, you're only looking at around $630 more than the analogue alternative--not too shabby.

    Switchback - fuel for the trail.


    pics to follow shortly.

    btw, this system can be routed almost completely internally on a bmc four stroke or most any frame with internal routing for a dropper post or remote shock lockout.
    with the internal battery, the only evidence of the setup is the servo box on the shock and the wires leading into the fork. it's very, very clean and not a clunky setup at all.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    138

    update w/ pix

    a few updates:

    I borrowed the SM-PC interface controller from my mechanic to enable the middle switch setting. just go to the shimano e-tube project page and download the pc software, which conveniently includes all firmware updates for the battery (where the firmware is stored).

    *I couldn't find any reference to this, but you have to plug the controller's 2 wires as follows: one into the battery itself, and one into the shock servo where the battery connects. You basically have to complete the 'circuit'; otherwise, it wont be able to detect the battery, shock, fork, iCD switch. also to note is that you have to initially update the firmware (in the battery) by just plugging it into the battery.



    got a chance to tool around on the iCD setup this evening on a local trail I walk my dog on (wasn't wearing mtb shoes or gear).

    a few observations: it's fricken schweet!

    "zip zip" and you can go from fully locked out to fully open, or climb/hardtail mode/descend (depending on how you configure it).

    basically you have 3 switch settings with 3 combinations of locked/open front/rear.

    The iCD switch needs to be position correctly or the ergonomics suffer a little. It does have a thumb indent and an index finger indent for moving the switch.

    The switch is TINY and fits snugly between your grip and bar (assuming your grip's lock from the outside like ergons).

    wire clutter is minimal if you take advantage of your bike's internal dropper post routing (or just use the wire cover kit).

    the damping on the 2014 shock and fork is pretty dramatic compared to the 2013 setup, which definitely blew through it's travel too easily in 'descend' mode.

    I went from 95 psi in the rear (around %15 sag) to 60psi and from 90 to 65 up front in order to get it to feel similar to my old set up.

    There's definitely a pretty noticeable platform feeling with the suspension unlocked. It's more firm, but seems to have more bump sensitivity.

    even climb mode has good small bump sensitivity so the tires track the terrain better when w/ the suspension locked.

    If you ride the iCD setup while using your old PSI settings, you wont notice a dramatic difference going from locked to unlocked since the 2014 float line-up has way more damping when fully open (at least not on fairly smooth trails and fire roads).

    iCD really lets you run more sag and travel on your suspension since you can firm it up instantaneously.

    This may not seem like a big deal to the trail rider, but to someone in the thick of a technical race or someone w/ DW-link suspension that has a long reach to the CTD lever, this means the difference between actually using climb/descend and just staying in trail mode b/c you can't take your hands off the bars due to technical terrain.

    I currently have the battery ghetto-rigged until the internal BTR2 seatpost battery arrives. Then, it'll be super stealth.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails FOX FLOAT iCD riders-img_5593.jpg  

    FOX FLOAT iCD riders-img_5594.jpg  

    FOX FLOAT iCD riders-img_5595.jpg  

    FOX FLOAT iCD riders-img_5596.jpg  

    FOX FLOAT iCD riders-img_5597.jpg  

    FOX FLOAT iCD riders-img_5623.jpg  

    FOX FLOAT iCD riders-img_5625.jpg  


  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    138
    Praying Mantis wanted to take the iCD-equipped Fourstroke for a test ride.

    he rode along for a good 1/2 mile.

    Praying Mantis approves

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: RSAmerica's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    74

    FOX FLOAT iCD riders

    I just installed the CTD remote (cable Actuated) on my 2014 float. It works great.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    138
    Quote Originally Posted by RSAmerica View Post
    I just installed the CTD remote (cable Actuated) on my 2014 float. It works great.
    this thread is about the electronic iCD 'remote'--totally different setup.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: RSAmerica's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    74
    Quote Originally Posted by Jamesm925 View Post
    this thread is about the electronic iCD 'remote'--totally different setup.
    It was just an FYI.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    138
    The BTR2 internal battery works flawlessly with the iCD setup. didn't even need to update the firmware or anything. It's super stealth; keeps the battery out of the elements. You can't even tell it's an electronic setup unless you look closely.

    I used this 1/4 in rubber foam tape from the plumbing dept at the local hardware store and added some double sided tape on the end, then twirled the battery into my easton ec90 seat post. It's super snug, but can be pulled out pretty easily if needed. dont even really need the double sided tape to be honest.

    you'll also want a short (around 150-200mm di2 connector wire to go from the iCD switch to the 3 port terminal). The battery comes with a 'dummy plug' you can put into the middle port hole so water doesn't get in.

    Charging is a little annoying since you have to plug it directly into a computer w/ a USB port (or one of those new wall outlets w/ a USB port).

    hopefully Fox picks up on this and starts providing it as an option instead of the clunky, outdated external battery.

    most MTBs come with internal routing for a dropper post and remote shock lockout.

    for a large BMC, you need a 1400mm wire connector for the shock to fork, and around 1000 for the shock to the internal battery.

    you also need a 300 from the fork to the junction box, and a 100-200 from the junction box to the iCD switch.

    it sounds like it's a lot of wiring, but it can be done to look way cleaner than any external, analogue remote lockout.

    I tested this out at our local short track race, and it makes a MASSIVE difference in being able to get out of the saddle and sprint, and then open it up for technical sections.

    I can get out of the saddle and put the power down again, sprinting instead of mashing while seating and having to lose power from Trail mode soaking up my efforts.

    IMHO, Fox's iCD system is a better performance upgrade than even a pair of lightweight Enve wheels. It essentially eliminates ANY loss of power due to suspension bob. My bike is already very efficient w/ the suspension open; but, it doesn't matter how efficient your bike is, they all will bob around and rob your power when you try to sprint out of the saddle.

    sure, you could go w/ a brain system, but that's not exactly plush from what i've seen.

    previously, I could only managed to run it in trail mode, lock the front on climbs, switch back to trail on descents.

    the bike was all over the place when I would get out of the saddle, and I also ended up running around %15 sag w/ a really stiff shock to add in the extra platform lacking in the 'descend' setting on the 2013 CTD shock and fork.

    the 2014 shock and fork have way more platform built in, so: 1) you can run less sag b/c it's not needed, and 2) the iCD lets you run it even more plush b/c you can firm it up so quickly.

    with my 2013 CTD shock and fork, I was running around 95 PSI front/rear.

    Now, i'm running around 65 and am not even using all the travel popping off jumps and wall rides at the local bike park.

    This setup is fantastic for races, especially short track and XC races with lots of quick changes from technical sections to even shorter, smoother single track or fire roads. It's also very effective on flow trails that you can ride like a pump track.








    anatolian shepherd not included



  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WR304's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    3,420

    FOX FLOAT iCD riders

    Quote Originally Posted by Jamesm925 View Post
    Charging is a little annoying since you have to plug it directly into a computer w/ a USB port (or one of those new wall outlets w/ a USB port).
    Unless you have a high voltage USB port a computer's USB ports aren't great for charging devices. It usually takes ages.

    Something like this New Trent USB charger is more effective for recharging any battery powered device that connects via USB, as it can do it much quicker. For the bike you could put the charger on a long mains extension so that it can be located near to where you store the bike.

    http://www.amazon.com/New-Trent-high...ds=Usb+charger

    How often do you think the internal battery will need charging? I don't think Fox iCD draws as much power as Shimano Di2 so it could be quite infrequent?

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    138
    I think the Di2 road stuff needs charging every month or so (maybe longer). This can prob go a really long time. It took around 2 hrs plugged into a mac usb port.
    thanks for the recommendation on that charger. 'preciate it.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    138
    btw, I tried using my iphone AC USB adaptor, and it didn't work. do you think this trent charger will work?

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WR304's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    3,420

    FOX FLOAT iCD riders

    I'd have thought that a generic USB charger ought to work. According to this an iPhone charger should work with a Shimano SM-BCR2 charger unit:

    http://glorycycles.blogspot.co.uk/20...onversion.html

    Sending a quick email to Glory Cycles or Fairwheel bikes to ask what USB chargers they recommend might provide a lead on a suitable charger to buy, as it's possible the Shimano SM-BCR2 charge unit could be picky about which USB chargers it will work with. Have you tried a different USB cable with the iPhone charger also?

    http://www.extremetech.com/computing...our-smartphone

    I'm not sure if it's any use but apparently there was a firmware update late June for the battery also. If it isn't installed that may help?

    http://weightweenies.starbike.com/fo...bile_disable=1

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 5
    Last Post: 07-16-2013, 02:37 AM
  2. Replies: 5
    Last Post: 05-07-2013, 09:53 PM
  3. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 03-09-2013, 07:43 AM
  4. Fox float 29er bits fit into float 26er??
    By stejekyll in forum Shocks and Suspension
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 10-11-2012, 07:34 AM
  5. Replies: 5
    Last Post: 04-27-2011, 07:10 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •