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  1. #1
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    FOX FLOAT iCD riders

    are any of you guys using the new fox iCD setup on your bikes?

    I'm surprised any mention of this system is pre-2013. not a single review or mention of it this year, and now there's a 2014 version out.

    just curious what your experience is like with the float icd fork/shock--especially those of you running FS bikes.

  2. #2
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    I am riding an Orbea Oiz with the iCD. The system works well, but the bike doesn't really need it. Still, I probably lock and unlock the bike more than a 100 times a ride. I use it way more than any other lockout system.
    "The best pace is suicide pace, and today is a good day to die." Steve Prefontaine

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    i read somewhere that there's a spacer you can remove to enable 'the middle' switch option (which you can program with the accessory software).

    can you confirm this?

    gorgeous bike, btw.

  4. #4
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    That would be news to me. I have heard their is suppose to be a middle option available or coming available.

    Thank you. Believe it or not the bike rides better then in it looks.
    "The best pace is suicide pace, and today is a good day to die." Steve Prefontaine

  5. #5
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    ---from the bicycling.com article on iCD:
    "The first iCD bike I rode had an intermediate setting that put the shock in Climb mode and the fork in Descend but data acquisition and athlete feedback suggested that an all-or-nothing approach would be more favorable. As a result the intermediate setting was removed from production units but it can be reactivated via a PC interface and removing a small spacer on the switch. "



    How much does your frame weigh? Seemed suspicious that orbea won't give the weight on their site and even talks about how "feel" is more important. Still, I'd be all over a 29er version of that bike

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jamesm925 View Post

    How much does your frame weigh? Seemed suspicious that orbea won't give the weight on their site and even talks about how "feel" is more important. Still, I'd be all over a 29er version of that bike
    I have never weighed the bare frame. I think the claimed weight is around 1.8kg.

    My bike set up with the iCD, XTR, including wheels, Pro components, comes in at 20 to 22lbs. 20lbs is with single ring, race wheels and tires. 22lb is with a double and durable tires and wheels.

    It is too bad for Orbea that they didn't release the bike in 650b or a 29er version. It kills me to say it but 26inch bikes just don't sell anymore. Still if you get a chance to demo one you should, I have never ridden a bike that comes even close on technical climbs.
    "The best pace is suicide pace, and today is a good day to die." Steve Prefontaine

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    yea, bought mine, then saw the orbea and drooled...but it's not a 29er...so yea.

    lemme know if you figure out anything regarding the 'spacer' in the switch.

  8. #8
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    just wanted to share this with you guys, especially those of you that paid attention to the winning bike equipped front and rear with fox's new iCD system:

    FOX FLOAT iCD riders-men-118-603x440.jpg

    pay little attention to all the negative criticism people have been giving this system in the comments on the press-releases. All of these comments just amount to verbal masterbation prompted by a press-release. None of these people that are trashing the icd technology have actually ridden a bike equipped with it.

    I just picked up the 2014 fox float iCD fork/shock kit.

    in no particular order:

    1) the system defaults to 'open' if the battery dies or one of the wires is damaged---not the closed position.

    2) it's completely waterproof and can withstand riding in nasty conditions for days on end.

    3) fox will deny this if you call them (their reps are idiots), but the electronic switch has THREE positions. Default is 2, but the middle position can be enabled by removing a simple stop screw and configuring the buttons using the SM-PCE1 interface. They supply extra decals to relabel the buttons, and the MANUAL even confirms the 3rd/middle switch option.

    I called and inquired about this, and both reps told me it only supports climb/descend modes only.

    THIS is utter ********.

    you can program 3 settings in a number of combinations ranging from:

    climb, trail, descend - to - climb, locked rear/open front, descend - to - climb, locked front/open rear, descend.

    In effect, this is a digital version of CTD, with the option to run C/D or C/hardtail mode/D etc.

    Apparently there's not much communication between fox and shimano, b/c the system is fully compatible with shimano's new BTR2 internal seat post mounted battery and the EW-90 junction box and external charger.

    If you add up the cost of a 2014 fox float 32 29 100mm remote adjust fork and the rear shock, you end up with roughly $900 for the fork and $500 for the shock (before taxes). after taxes, you're looking at around $1500 for the setup.


    now add in the electronic components: wiring kit: $150, battery: $100, battery mount: $130, battery charger $100, iCD switch: (???)

    that's another $480, not even account for the iCD switch (lets say that costs $150.

    so now you're at $630 for the electronics and $1500 for the analogue suspension.

    guess what: the digital/icd shock/fork and icd electronics kit is $1999 before tax.

    $630 more than going the analogue remote lever route....

    most people's bikes dont come stock w/ a remote lockout on their shock. so you end up having to buy a new rear shock.

    if your fork didn't come stock w/ a remote lockout, it's around $300+ to upgrade it to a remote lockout--so it'll cost you around $800 to upgrade to a remote lockout front/rear analogue setup.

    or you could just sell your stock setup for around $1,000, and the icd kit will only cost $1000.

    if you're building a new bike, you're only looking at around $630 more than the analogue alternative--not too shabby.

    Switchback - fuel for the trail.


    pics to follow shortly.

    btw, this system can be routed almost completely internally on a bmc four stroke or most any frame with internal routing for a dropper post or remote shock lockout.
    with the internal battery, the only evidence of the setup is the servo box on the shock and the wires leading into the fork. it's very, very clean and not a clunky setup at all.

  9. #9
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    update w/ pix

    a few updates:

    I borrowed the SM-PC interface controller from my mechanic to enable the middle switch setting. just go to the shimano e-tube project page and download the pc software, which conveniently includes all firmware updates for the battery (where the firmware is stored).

    *I couldn't find any reference to this, but you have to plug the controller's 2 wires as follows: one into the battery itself, and one into the shock servo where the battery connects. You basically have to complete the 'circuit'; otherwise, it wont be able to detect the battery, shock, fork, iCD switch. also to note is that you have to initially update the firmware (in the battery) by just plugging it into the battery.



    got a chance to tool around on the iCD setup this evening on a local trail I walk my dog on (wasn't wearing mtb shoes or gear).

    a few observations: it's fricken schweet!

    "zip zip" and you can go from fully locked out to fully open, or climb/hardtail mode/descend (depending on how you configure it).

    basically you have 3 switch settings with 3 combinations of locked/open front/rear.

    The iCD switch needs to be position correctly or the ergonomics suffer a little. It does have a thumb indent and an index finger indent for moving the switch.

    The switch is TINY and fits snugly between your grip and bar (assuming your grip's lock from the outside like ergons).

    wire clutter is minimal if you take advantage of your bike's internal dropper post routing (or just use the wire cover kit).

    the damping on the 2014 shock and fork is pretty dramatic compared to the 2013 setup, which definitely blew through it's travel too easily in 'descend' mode.

    I went from 95 psi in the rear (around %15 sag) to 60psi and from 90 to 65 up front in order to get it to feel similar to my old set up.

    There's definitely a pretty noticeable platform feeling with the suspension unlocked. It's more firm, but seems to have more bump sensitivity.

    even climb mode has good small bump sensitivity so the tires track the terrain better when w/ the suspension locked.

    If you ride the iCD setup while using your old PSI settings, you wont notice a dramatic difference going from locked to unlocked since the 2014 float line-up has way more damping when fully open (at least not on fairly smooth trails and fire roads).

    iCD really lets you run more sag and travel on your suspension since you can firm it up instantaneously.

    This may not seem like a big deal to the trail rider, but to someone in the thick of a technical race or someone w/ DW-link suspension that has a long reach to the CTD lever, this means the difference between actually using climb/descend and just staying in trail mode b/c you can't take your hands off the bars due to technical terrain.

    I currently have the battery ghetto-rigged until the internal BTR2 seatpost battery arrives. Then, it'll be super stealth.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails FOX FLOAT iCD riders-img_5593.jpg  

    FOX FLOAT iCD riders-img_5594.jpg  

    FOX FLOAT iCD riders-img_5595.jpg  

    FOX FLOAT iCD riders-img_5596.jpg  

    FOX FLOAT iCD riders-img_5597.jpg  

    FOX FLOAT iCD riders-img_5623.jpg  

    FOX FLOAT iCD riders-img_5625.jpg  


  10. #10
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    Praying Mantis wanted to take the iCD-equipped Fourstroke for a test ride.

    he rode along for a good 1/2 mile.

    Praying Mantis approves

  11. #11
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    FOX FLOAT iCD riders

    I just installed the CTD remote (cable Actuated) on my 2014 float. It works great.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by RSAmerica View Post
    I just installed the CTD remote (cable Actuated) on my 2014 float. It works great.
    this thread is about the electronic iCD 'remote'--totally different setup.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jamesm925 View Post
    this thread is about the electronic iCD 'remote'--totally different setup.
    It was just an FYI.

  14. #14
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    The BTR2 internal battery works flawlessly with the iCD setup. didn't even need to update the firmware or anything. It's super stealth; keeps the battery out of the elements. You can't even tell it's an electronic setup unless you look closely.

    I used this 1/4 in rubber foam tape from the plumbing dept at the local hardware store and added some double sided tape on the end, then twirled the battery into my easton ec90 seat post. It's super snug, but can be pulled out pretty easily if needed. dont even really need the double sided tape to be honest.

    you'll also want a short (around 150-200mm di2 connector wire to go from the iCD switch to the 3 port terminal). The battery comes with a 'dummy plug' you can put into the middle port hole so water doesn't get in.

    Charging is a little annoying since you have to plug it directly into a computer w/ a USB port (or one of those new wall outlets w/ a USB port).

    hopefully Fox picks up on this and starts providing it as an option instead of the clunky, outdated external battery.

    most MTBs come with internal routing for a dropper post and remote shock lockout.

    for a large BMC, you need a 1400mm wire connector for the shock to fork, and around 1000 for the shock to the internal battery.

    you also need a 300 from the fork to the junction box, and a 100-200 from the junction box to the iCD switch.

    it sounds like it's a lot of wiring, but it can be done to look way cleaner than any external, analogue remote lockout.

    I tested this out at our local short track race, and it makes a MASSIVE difference in being able to get out of the saddle and sprint, and then open it up for technical sections.

    I can get out of the saddle and put the power down again, sprinting instead of mashing while seating and having to lose power from Trail mode soaking up my efforts.

    IMHO, Fox's iCD system is a better performance upgrade than even a pair of lightweight Enve wheels. It essentially eliminates ANY loss of power due to suspension bob. My bike is already very efficient w/ the suspension open; but, it doesn't matter how efficient your bike is, they all will bob around and rob your power when you try to sprint out of the saddle.

    sure, you could go w/ a brain system, but that's not exactly plush from what i've seen.

    previously, I could only managed to run it in trail mode, lock the front on climbs, switch back to trail on descents.

    the bike was all over the place when I would get out of the saddle, and I also ended up running around %15 sag w/ a really stiff shock to add in the extra platform lacking in the 'descend' setting on the 2013 CTD shock and fork.

    the 2014 shock and fork have way more platform built in, so: 1) you can run less sag b/c it's not needed, and 2) the iCD lets you run it even more plush b/c you can firm it up so quickly.

    with my 2013 CTD shock and fork, I was running around 95 PSI front/rear.

    Now, i'm running around 65 and am not even using all the travel popping off jumps and wall rides at the local bike park.

    This setup is fantastic for races, especially short track and XC races with lots of quick changes from technical sections to even shorter, smoother single track or fire roads. It's also very effective on flow trails that you can ride like a pump track.








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  15. #15
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    FOX FLOAT iCD riders

    Quote Originally Posted by Jamesm925 View Post
    Charging is a little annoying since you have to plug it directly into a computer w/ a USB port (or one of those new wall outlets w/ a USB port).
    Unless you have a high voltage USB port a computer's USB ports aren't great for charging devices. It usually takes ages.

    Something like this New Trent USB charger is more effective for recharging any battery powered device that connects via USB, as it can do it much quicker. For the bike you could put the charger on a long mains extension so that it can be located near to where you store the bike.

    http://www.amazon.com/New-Trent-high...ds=Usb+charger

    How often do you think the internal battery will need charging? I don't think Fox iCD draws as much power as Shimano Di2 so it could be quite infrequent?

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    I think the Di2 road stuff needs charging every month or so (maybe longer). This can prob go a really long time. It took around 2 hrs plugged into a mac usb port.
    thanks for the recommendation on that charger. 'preciate it.

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    btw, I tried using my iphone AC USB adaptor, and it didn't work. do you think this trent charger will work?

  18. #18
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    FOX FLOAT iCD riders

    I'd have thought that a generic USB charger ought to work. According to this an iPhone charger should work with a Shimano SM-BCR2 charger unit:

    http://glorycycles.blogspot.co.uk/20...onversion.html

    Sending a quick email to Glory Cycles or Fairwheel bikes to ask what USB chargers they recommend might provide a lead on a suitable charger to buy, as it's possible the Shimano SM-BCR2 charge unit could be picky about which USB chargers it will work with. Have you tried a different USB cable with the iPhone charger also?

    http://www.extremetech.com/computing...our-smartphone

    I'm not sure if it's any use but apparently there was a firmware update late June for the battery also. If it isn't installed that may help?

    http://weightweenies.starbike.com/fo...bile_disable=1

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    Bumpity bump

    Is this still being promoted? In the UK it only seems to be available on one (650B) fork for 2015, disappointingly.

  20. #20
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    FOX FLOAT iCD riders

    Fox iCD is still around. At World Cup level a lot (most? ) of the Fox sponsored riders use it on both their hardtails and full suspension bikes. It's not very obvious on the hardtails but Julien Absalon and all the BMC team use it. Here are links to some pictures from the 2014 Nove Mesto round where the iCD shocks are visible:

    Moritz Milatz was riding a BMC Fourstroke FS01 29 fitted with Fox iCD electronic shocks.

    XCO World Cup #3 – Nove Mesto Elite: Nino Schurter und Pauline Ferrand-Prevot siegen [Fotostory] - MTB-News.de

    Dan McConnell rides a Trek Superfly 29er and also has the Fox iCD electronic shocks. If you look in the mtb-news.de pictures the iCD rear shock is distinctive.

    XCO World Cup #3 – Nove Mesto Elite: Nino Schurter und Pauline Ferrand-Prevot siegen [Fotostory] - MTB-News.de

    Catharine Pendrel uses Fox iCD on her Orbea:

    XCO World Cup #3 ? Nove Mesto Elite: Nino Schurter und Pauline Ferrand-Prevot siegen [Fotostory] - MTB-News.de

    Shimano have recently launched their XTR Di2 electronic shifting also. XTR Di2 has native support for Fox iCD electronic suspension built in. The wiring and a single battery is shared between the electronic gears and electronic suspension whilst the XTR Di2 head unit display also has the ability to show the Fox iCD suspension settings on screen:

    Shimano Unveils XTR Di2 M9050, Mountain Bikes Go Digital, Lose a Shifter

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    Thanks for that. I think my confusion is because it's only available on one fork in the UK, and then not in a wheel size that you'd associate with XC racing. Are things different in the 'States?

  22. #22
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    FOX FLOAT iCD riders

    So far as I can tell the Fox website is broken, which is why it's only listing that one 650b fork. If you do a search for iCD it lists the forks and shocks below, although the web pages themselves are missing.



    Have you spoken to Mojo? (the UK distributor for Fox). They might have more of an idea. With this sort of complicated and expensive big ticket item thing you probably want to get it through a bike shop if possible, rather than somewhere like eBay, so that if there is an issue later on you don't have any warranty concerns.

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    I'll drop Mojo a line and see what they say.

    TBH it's largely of academic interest for me at the mo, but when XT Di2 is launched things will be different.

    Edit - just heard from Mojo. The iCD system isn't available in the UK
    Last edited by ratherbeintobago; 06-11-2014 at 03:10 AM.

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    compatibility of iCD fork mechanism?

    To any of you iCD users out there . . .

    Lets say I have a 2013 iCD fork and a 2014 CTD fork without a remote. Could I swap the top cap mechanisms from one fork to the other?

    The goal is to end up with a 2013 non-remote (still with its 2013 damper) and a 2014 iCD (still with its 2014 damper).

    Essentially I'm asking if the engagement mechanism is easily decoupled from the damper itself.

  25. #25
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    Hi:
    first time posting so forgive me if i am making some errors.
    Buying a used bike ( Scott spark 900 rc) with Fox float iCD.
    Selllers does not have the charger.
    Which charger do i need and where can i buy it?
    Cheers
    Quote Originally Posted by Jamesm925 View Post
    The BTR2 internal battery works flawlessly with the iCD setup. didn't even need to update the firmware or anything. It's super stealth; keeps the battery out of the elements. You can't even tell it's an electronic setup unless you look closely.

    I used this 1/4 in rubber foam tape from the plumbing dept at the local hardware store and added some double sided tape on the end, then twirled the battery into my easton ec90 seat post. It's super snug, but can be pulled out pretty easily if needed. dont even really need the double sided tape to be honest.

    you'll also want a short (around 150-200mm di2 connector wire to go from the iCD switch to the 3 port terminal). The battery comes with a 'dummy plug' you can put into the middle port hole so water doesn't get in.

    Charging is a little annoying since you have to plug it directly into a computer w/ a USB port (or one of those new wall outlets w/ a USB port).

    hopefully Fox picks up on this and starts providing it as an option instead of the clunky, outdated external battery.

    most MTBs come with internal routing for a dropper post and remote shock lockout.

    for a large BMC, you need a 1400mm wire connector for the shock to fork, and around 1000 for the shock to the internal battery.

    you also need a 300 from the fork to the junction box, and a 100-200 from the junction box to the iCD switch.

    it sounds like it's a lot of wiring, but it can be done to look way cleaner than any external, analogue remote lockout.

    I tested this out at our local short track race, and it makes a MASSIVE difference in being able to get out of the saddle and sprint, and then open it up for technical sections.

    I can get out of the saddle and put the power down again, sprinting instead of mashing while seating and having to lose power from Trail mode soaking up my efforts.

    IMHO, Fox's iCD system is a better performance upgrade than even a pair of lightweight Enve wheels. It essentially eliminates ANY loss of power due to suspension bob. My bike is already very efficient w/ the suspension open; but, it doesn't matter how efficient your bike is, they all will bob around and rob your power when you try to sprint out of the saddle.

    sure, you could go w/ a brain system, but that's not exactly plush from what i've seen.

    previously, I could only managed to run it in trail mode, lock the front on climbs, switch back to trail on descents.

    the bike was all over the place when I would get out of the saddle, and I also ended up running around %15 sag w/ a really stiff shock to add in the extra platform lacking in the 'descend' setting on the 2013 CTD shock and fork.

    the 2014 shock and fork have way more platform built in, so: 1) you can run less sag b/c it's not needed, and 2) the iCD lets you run it even more plush b/c you can firm it up so quickly.

    with my 2013 CTD shock and fork, I was running around 95 PSI front/rear.

    Now, i'm running around 65 and am not even using all the travel popping off jumps and wall rides at the local bike park.

    This setup is fantastic for races, especially short track and XC races with lots of quick changes from technical sections to even shorter, smoother single track or fire roads. It's also very effective on flow trails that you can ride like a pump track.








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  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by paraiba View Post
    Hi:
    first time posting so forgive me if i am making some errors.
    Buying a used bike ( Scott spark 900 rc) with Fox float iCD.
    Selllers does not have the charger.
    Which charger do i need and where can i buy it?
    Cheers
    The Fox iCD system uses the Shimano Di2 etube wiring and chargers. It's all fully interchangeable so you can buy the Shimano parts.

    If you get the new Shimano XTR Di2 electronic shifting that will integrate fully with the Fox iCD system, using the existing battery and wiring.

    If your Scott Spark 900 rc has an external down tube Shimano BTR-1 battery it is charged with a Shimano SM-BCR-1 battery charger:

    http://www.wheelies.co.uk/p51440/Shi...ower-Lead.aspx

    If it has an internal seat post mounted Shimano battery it is charged with a Shimano SM-BCR2 USB charger.

    http://www.wheelies.co.uk/p62927/Shi...onnection.aspx

    As part of the bike's wiring with an internal battery you'll need a Shimano SM-EW90 junction box for the charger to connect to.

    http://www.wheelies.co.uk/p62924/Shi...-A-3-port.aspx

    If you're in the US try Arts Cyclery. They appear quite knowledgeable about Shimano Di2.

    http://www.artscyclery.com/

  27. #27
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    Something worth mentioning is that Magura offer a similar eLECT wireless suspension system, consisting of a fork, rear shock and handlebar remote. It uses bluetooth so doesn't require the wiring loom and internal battery of the Fox iCD system.

    It can be run manually or in a "full automatic" mode also:

    http://www.pinkbike.com/news/magura-...pers-2014.html

    .

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    Hey guys, hopefully someone is still watching this.

    I need a new shock for my Niner RIP 9 Or send the current one back to Push'd.

    I'm seeing the iCD shocks selling new for less than service costs.

    Problem is that it's only the shock.

    So some questions...

    Can you use this without a fork? How much do the other parts cost (switch, battery, cables, etc).

    Can this thing be hacked? Does anyone know more about how it works? I am wondering if it is just a normal servo inside but I think not. If the system truly is fail proof in the sense of reverting to open mode when a cable is severed then my guess has to be that it applies a constant voltage to the shock to hold it in modes other than open. This could be confirmed by learning more about what happens to a bike that is just sitting in locked mode... Does the battery die, does it eventually go back to open after a certain amount of time to keep the battery from dying? Or was I wrong about the thing going back to open when disconnected from the system while locked out?

    Anyways I don't lock out my front I either run it open or platform so all I'm really worried about is locking out the rear. At this time I don't do that on the rp23 because it's to dangerous to do while riding. I'd like to lock it out while climbing.

    Anyways I think I'm going to buy this thing no matter what... So if you guys know anything that could help let me know.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Givmedew View Post
    Hey guys, hopefully someone is still watching this.

    I need a new shock for my Niner RIP 9 Or send the current one back to Push'd.

    I'm seeing the iCD shocks selling new for less than service costs.

    Problem is that it's only the shock.

    So some questions...

    Can you use this without a fork? How much do the other parts cost (switch, battery, cables, etc).

    Can this thing be hacked? Does anyone know more about how it works? I am wondering if it is just a normal servo inside but I think not. If the system truly is fail proof in the sense of reverting to open mode when a cable is severed then my guess has to be that it applies a constant voltage to the shock to hold it in modes other than open. This could be confirmed by learning more about what happens to a bike that is just sitting in locked mode... Does the battery die, does it eventually go back to open after a certain amount of time to keep the battery from dying? Or was I wrong about the thing going back to open when disconnected from the system while locked out?

    Anyways I don't lock out my front I either run it open or platform so all I'm really worried about is locking out the rear. At this time I don't do that on the rp23 because it's to dangerous to do while riding. I'd like to lock it out while climbing.

    Anyways I think I'm going to buy this thing no matter what... So if you guys know anything that could help let me know.
    I have been using ICD for a long time, longer then just about anybody. One of bikes still has the first pro-type on them.

    The system has been absolutely bomb proof. Huge battery life, even when the light is red you telling you it needs to be charge you still a couple of weeks of riding. The only time I have had to deal with dead battery is when I have let the bike sit through the winter.

    Of course once you have one on your bike, you now have a battery that can be used for di2......
    "The best pace is suicide pace, and today is a good day to die." Steve Prefontaine

  30. #30
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    I have the 2016 version and I have been having battery issues with mine. With a new internal battery and fully updated firmware versions, my battery will only last a few days.

    I have contacted Fox and they mentioned that there are a few incidents out there as of late with faulty ICD switches that are draining the battery. I have a new ICD switch coming so I will report when I get it. Other than that, the system works great. It really is nice having the 3 positions available.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by eggdog View Post
    I have the 2016 version and I have been having battery issues with mine. With a new internal battery and fully updated firmware versions, my battery will only last a few days.

    I have contacted Fox and they mentioned that there are a few incidents out there as of late with faulty ICD switches that are draining the battery. I have a new ICD switch coming so I will report when I get it. Other than that, the system works great. It really is nice having the 3 positions available.
    Have you tried disconnecting the switch when you store the bike? Nice way to confirm that issue is in the switch.
    "The best pace is suicide pace, and today is a good day to die." Steve Prefontaine

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    Updated on my ICD set up. Mine all of a sudden was burning thru the battery with only about a 2 day lifespan before it died and needed a full charge. Fox mentioned that the switch was at fault and sent a new one. That was the ticket! New switch and all is back to normal again!

  33. #33
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    Is there a way to use the same battery for both the di2 and fox icd?

  34. #34
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    The Fox IRD electronic shocks and Shimano XTR/XT Di2 electronic shifting both use the same type of Shimano etube wiring and integrate together. They connect to the same battery, so you have one battery running both systems without any duplication.

    If you have the Shimano Di2 SC-MT800 or SC-M9051 display it will show your Fox IRD suspension settings on the onscreen display as you ride too.

    It's only the Shimano and Fox electronics that use the same wiring however. If you had a bike with XTR/XT Di2 and the Rock Shox E:I electronic shocks (Eg: Lapierre bikes) then they would require a seperate battery and wiring for each system - one battery for the gears and one for the suspension.

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