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  1. #1
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    Fat guy needs winter taining program

    I used to be in shape....gained 40 lbs the last 3 yrs. On verge of qualifying for Clydesdale class. Want to do more races this year. I am floundering due to a lack of a weekly regimen on my trainer. Need simple exercise plan to shed lbs and improve cardio. Any suggestions appreciated.
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  2. #2
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    Watch what you eat and drink. You can exercise all day everyday but if eat a bunch of junk and wash it down with a bottle of junk you'll stay a fatty.
    Workout program? If you're 40 pounds out of shape don't just ride your bike. Mix it up, do a lot of things. I'd say try a dvd program like P90X, Insanity, Asylum. You won't be able to do any of them right now but you can modify the moves. You could even switch Plyometrics and the Kenpo workouts for trainer rides.

  3. #3
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    Hi skankingbiker, since you haven't informed your age, I can suggest a rather general approach in your situation. Mostly, the big roadblock faced by those attempting a comeback is lack of motivation and it can be overcome by peer support in most cases. Therefore, IMO you should start in a group or try out a free spinning class for yourself.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by prince23 View Post
    Hi skankingbiker, since you haven't informed your age, I can suggest a rather general approach in your situation. Mostly, the big roadblock faced by those attempting a comeback is lack of motivation and it can be overcome by peer support in most cases. Therefore, IMO you should start in a group or try out a free spinning class for yourself.
    Age is 36
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  5. #5
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    I'm not saying that you're obese or anything, but I found this read fascinating:

    Obesity - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    For the most part, just eat less and you'll lose weight. It's that simple.

    "At an individual level, a combination of excessive food energy intake and a lack of physical activity is thought to explain most cases of obesity."
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  6. #6
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    Having just gone from 40lbs overweight to my current weight perhaps I can offer some advice. I'm a bit older than you but not much.

    The single biggest thing you can do is change your diet. It's not just about eating less, its about eating right. Here's a simple rule of thumb - if it comes in a package or a bottle --> don't eat or drink it. Start every day off with breakfast. Eat LOTS of protein, drink lots of water and eat lots of fruits & veggies. I actually eat more now than I did before - but if its white or processed I avoid it. (xcept for maybe 1 meal a week as a treat). For me, it all came down to removing bread\pasta\ empty carbs\processed stuff and cheese.

    And of course start working out - start spinning if you can. Work on building a base and getting your body used to burning fat instead of carbs. mixing in some light weights a few times a week is great way to boost your metabolism and build lean muscle mass. And again - eat breakfast every day - that kick starts your metabolism

    Good Luck. Healthy maintained weight loss will see you lose 1-2lbs a week - that should be a pretty consistent goal. 1 lb of fat is roughly 3500 calories - or 500 calories a day. can you eat 300 calories less per day and burn 200 more? that's a pretty realistic goal. If you try to binge with some fad diet etc. you may loose more quickly but you'll just re-bound and gain it back.

    Another thing to keep in mind is that as your body changes, your going to build more muscle - which weighs more than fat. So even though some weeks it may feel like you've not lost weight - you've gained muscle - which is pretty darn good in itself.

    Hope that helps
    Good luck

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by skankingbiker View Post
    Need simple exercise plan to shed lbs and improve cardio. Any suggestions appreciated.
    You have a trainer and want a simple plan. Spend $12 and buy the Time Crunched Cyclist and do the first plan in the book.

    The key is to be consistent.

    Its basically this:
    Tuesday one hour with some hard efforts
    Thursday one hour with some hard efforts
    Saturday 2 hours-ish
    Sunday 2 hours-ish

    A spin class for one of the hours on the weekend trainer helps immensly.

    That gets you on the bike 4 days a week. Add to that some weights and or core training on your rest days.

    Cut out all the starch from your diet. No more white rice, potatoes, bread, pasta and absolutely no soda. Nutrition is a whole conversation by itself, but ditching the starches is a good start.

  8. #8
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    Thanks for the tips. Its hard to not eat processed foods when you work 12 + hours a day and don't get home until 10pm.....Eating late is probably another big part of my problem.
    Veni Vidi Biki

    I came, I saw, I biked.

  9. #9
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    I am currently working with the OU cycling team with their nutrition plans and then they are helping me with my riding schedule so we can all kill it this season. I would be more than happy to help you with building a few meal plans that will best fit your schedule. Just PM and I help as much as possible.

    goodluck buddy,
    Josh

  10. #10
    Has skills-will travel
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    I found that if I want to loose weight, it really doesn't matter what or when I eat. All that matters is how many calories I eat, and how many calories I burn - that simple.

    When I started tracking my calories, I was blown away how many calories per day I was drinking, and it didn't fill me up!

    I use a simple free App for my smartphone, and it also tells me if I am good with my Macro and Micro nutrients for the day besides calories.

  11. #11
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    One of my trainer workouts is commercial break intervals.

    I ride along in zone 2 during the show.

    Then I go to the next bigger chain ring for the commercial.

    This year, I put my planned training sessions on my Google Calendar. I move them around some as the week develops, but I'm finding I'm coming a lot closer to my weekly targets than when I just claimed I'd ride xxx hours this week, without saying when. It's helpful for a couple reasons - first, it makes me really think about what's feasible in terms of the rest of my life. Second, there's something about writing them down, or typing them down, I guess, and then having them be visible when I'm looking at my calendar that helps me feel more committed, and in a more definite way.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  12. #12
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    Here's what I did.

    On February 9, 2012, I weighed 236 pounds. I am 5' 6" tall. That's a BIT obese on the BMI scale

    I started a weight loss contest at work with 15 other people. $100 buy-in, winner take all, by percent body weight lost in 90 days. I set a personal goal to be at 190 pounds at the end of the contest.

    I read that the minimum caloric content for a male my age (47) is 1500. But I'm an engineer by degree, didn't believe that, and did the math to see how much of a daily reduction I needed to hit 190. I limited my calories to 1370 and used an iPhone App to track everything I ate. EVERYTHING. A packet of sugar in coffee got recorded. A freakin' Altoid mint got recorded (10 calories for 3 mints, in case you were wondering .

    For the first 30 days, all I did was limit calories. I didn't care much about WHAT I ate but care more about how much I ate. However, when tracking daily calories, you instantly learn some things about yourself and food. First, you learn to avoid calorie dense foods because you will hit your calorie limit and still be hungry. People say "Don't eat bread or pasta! You'll get fat." Maybe, but the reason I avoided bread and pasta was because I could eat more volume in fruit than bread and I wanted volume to avoid being hungry.

    For the second 30 days, I started walking. I travel a lot for work but could always find a place to walk near the hotel or on a treadmill.

    For the third 30 days, I mixed light jogging with my walking.

    In 90 days, I was 191 pounds and took second in the contest. I was out $100 but made $300 in side bets (I work with the most competitive people you can imagine!).

    At 8 months in, I started mountain biking again after 8 years off the bike. I've been riding 3-6 hours a week since October. Mostly trails, but a few hours on a stationary trainer as well.

    Today, just a few weeks from my 1 year weight loss kickoff, I'm 168 pounds and only 3 pounds from my ultimate goal. That's 68 pounds lost but the VAST majority of it came from calorie control instead of exercise. The exercise was great for breaking through the inevitable plateaus but, in the end, it's very simple. I call it the Physics Diet.

    If you consume fewer calories than you expend, you HAVE to lose weight. It doesn't matter if those calories come in the form of broccoli or Big Macs. Eat less than you burn and you have to lose weight.

    Hope this helped.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by KevinGT View Post
    That's 68 pounds lost but the VAST majority of it came from calorie control instead of exercise. .
    Totally agree, have lost 40 pounds myself, havn't been able to lose the last 25. I've been exercising like crazy, cycling alot, and have been hitting the gym now it's winter. Havn't been eating bad, but I stopped counting the calories. Still stuck at 195-200; really want to be 175-180.

    I now have cut back the exercise and decreased my calorie intake, looks like I'm starting to lose weight again.

  14. #14
    Twin Six METAL Team
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    I'm 39, 5'10", and weighed around 225 in January 2011. Now, I weigh around 182.

    RIding the hell out of my bikes and core training helped, but I tend to credit the weight loss to a change in diet. One of the things I did was start reading labels, and I don't mean the nutrition facts...read the ingredients. If the ingredient list on your food reads like a bottle of shampoo, you probably shouldn't be ingesting it. Avoid anything in a box, and shop the perimeter of the store. That's where the "cleaner" food is. I only dip to the center aisles for spices and Larabars.

    I also started following the Paleo diet about 75% of the time. I tried going 100%, but found that I would bonk in a heartbeat during periods of hard workouts. So, I add rice, etc in to help. I'd say that I use a hybrid of Paleo and The Feedzone Cookbook.

    There are a lot of ways to skin this cat, just find one that works for you and your lifestyle. Honestly, this forum will probably be a great resource. Lots of success stories on here!

    Good luck to you, and keep us updated!

  15. #15
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    A few more things I did in terms of diet changes.

    While my "Physics Diet" technical doesn't hinge on what you eat, there were certain foods I declared as off limits regardless of my calorie intake that day. In addition to being calorie dense, these foods, for someone with obvious self control issues, are dangerous. My list of off limits foods is:

    Desert foods (cookies, cake, ice cream, etc.)
    Candy bars
    Deep fried foods (yup...nothing deep fried. Period)
    Non natural "snack foods." (no pretzels, chips, cheetos, baked lays, etc.)

    I also heavily limited alcohol. I was a 5-10 drinks a week guy and now I'm 3-4 drinks a month.

    My go-to snacks today are cheese, almonds (Blue Diamond BOLD almonds are amazing. Try the wasabi and soy! ), apples, and bananas.

    In 11 months, 21 days, I have not eaten an off limits food one time...and still going. Pretty cool!

    In that year, I've found only two scenarios where this is difficult:

    1. Airports when you're rushing to a flight. When you don't have the time to grab a healthy snack or lunch, and you KNOW it's going to be 4-6 hours before you can eat, it's tough not to bolt into that little store across from your gate and buy a bag of chips or M&Ms. I was in that situation at least 25 times in the last year. My decision, each time, was to suck it up and go hungry.

    2. Mexican restaurants. There aren't a lot of good choices at a Mexican restaurant. There are some, just not a lot. But that's not the challenge. The challenge is that never ending basket of chips they shove in your face the instant you sit down. I don't know how many calories are in that basket but since I stopped eating them, I've watched one person consume two full baskets on his own without even realizing it. I was that guy for years.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by KevinGT View Post
    First, you learn to avoid calorie dense foods because you will hit your calorie limit and still be hungry.
    That's a great point right there.

    Calories in one girl scout cookie = Calories of one small apple

    We can all dog down 10 girl scout cookies pretty easy, but try ten apples. It's nearly impossible!!

    Food choices do really matter.
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  17. #17
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    I'm totally on board with everyone's comments on calorie counting. I think KevinGT's posts are right on the mark. I've had success doing this using the Lose It! app. I didn't want to be on a diet, I just wanted to eat smarter and start by just knowing what I was doing to myself from my food decisions. Once you learn a little, you start to make different food decisions that are reflected in your weight. Exercising is a great component as it reduces your daily net calories, but the most important thing is limiting the calories in. That doesn't mean starving yourself and going to bed hungry, it means being aware if what you're eating and drinking and making good decisions.

    Sent from my XT907 using Tapatalk 2

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poncharelli View Post
    That's a great point right there.

    Calories in one girl scout cookie = Calories of one small apple
    Great example!

    Quote Originally Posted by ewarnerusa View Post
    That doesn't mean starving yourself and going to bed hungry, it means being aware if what you're eating and drinking and making good decisions.
    Spot on!

    In the last year, I've been "famished" exactly twice. Both were due to the airport scenario above. The reason eating correctly seems so hard is that we have conditioned ourselves to think that anything short of overstuffed means we're hungry. We are SO used to overeating that normal eating feels like starvation. Turn it into a numbers game (calories in vs. calories out) and you won't feel like you're starving because you can see exactly how much you're eating.

    One more quick story: I have been so focused on calories that when I started mountain biking again, I didn't change my diet. My standard Saturday ride burns about 900 calories. So if I'm eating 1500 calories and burning an extra 900, I'm way short for the day. After major bonks on my first few rides, I realized I needed to eat something before riding.

    So I'm at the grocery store with my smart-ass 18 year old son whose home from college for winter break. I'm standing in front of the energy bar displays reading nutritional information. My son, getting impatient, is telling me to hurry it up. I say "Give me a second, I'm looking for a low calorie energy bar."

    He looks at me and say "I'm not even an engineer and I know how absurd that statement is! Do you want me to find some jumbo shrimp next?"

    Good point, son!

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by skankingbiker View Post
    Its hard to not eat processed foods when you work 12 + hours a day and don't get home until 10pm.....Eating late is probably another big part of my problem.
    Blaming your work schedule isn't going to help anything. If there aren't any healthy eating options around the office then take control of the situation by packing a lunch and snacks.

  20. #20
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    Lot's of what these other guys have said! Last year for the first time in my life I made a decision to eat healthy and it did change my life for about the 6 months I maintained it. I would shop once a week for all of my meals/snacks at work, then eat dinner with the family.

    Add some form of said workout to that, and it will show results. BTW, I followed Paleo about 90%.

  21. #21
    MD Rider
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    Quote Originally Posted by skankingbiker View Post
    Thanks for the tips. Its hard to not eat processed foods when you work 12 + hours a day and don't get home until 10pm.....Eating late is probably another big part of my problem.
    You need to figure out a way to clean up your diet, or you will not lose the weight.

    I can throw a salad together in a few minutes. Drop some canned tuna in there and there's your protein. Leave the dressing off. (minimal prep time, no cooking/baking, etc = easy)

    <-dropped 35 lbs last year running, cycling and eating better.

    You can do it. Stay focused. Start small. Ride the trainer (I'd rather kill myself) consistently a few days a week and increase the time you ride each week. Keep a log - one that tracks your weight and also you time spent training. You can use a few websites to track your calories. Do that for a week or two and then you'll pretty much know how many cals you're putting in your body.

    I found the most effective time to train was in the AM, before eating anything. This will force your body to burn the fat off your body, rather than what's left over from lunch, dinner, or snack.

    Once you get into a routine, you should see the lbs come off pretty quickly if you're good about it.

    Good luck!

  22. #22
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    To chime in again and reinforce the calorie counting that we all seem to be plugging, I really have to say that using a smartphone app was the way to go for me. Calorie counting is hardly a new concept, but the actual effort of determining the calorie content of a dish per serving, then determining how many servings you've consumed, then keeping a log for a day, it just seems like a pain in the butt and way too easy to lose interest in.

    That's why the Lose It! app was so great. I haven't used others, they may be just as good or better. With this app (also an integrated website), you initially setup a plan. The plan is basically that you weigh X, you would like to weigh Y, and you would like to reach that goal of Y by losing Z pounds per week. The app then determines a daily calorie budget for you based on your goal. It is then your responsibility to keep track of all your calorie consumption and also exercise for calorie depletion. Now the responsibility is on you to be honest about logging it, and you must log EVERYTHING just like KevinGT was mentioning. If you lie about it, you're just cheating yourself.

    The Lose It app has a database of foods and their calorie content per unit. These units can be servings, cups, ounces, or whatever. The database also includes a large number of restaurant and supermarket foods. Figuring out how many calories was in your meal is as simple as looking it up in the database. To make it even easier still, the app includes a barcode scanner which eliminates the need to even look things up. If you ate or drank something that came in a package, scan the UPC barcode and its info is probably in the database. There are many other shortcuts, too, to your common foods once you have used the app for a while such as previous meals or custom recipes.

    There is also a huge exercise database. Yes, cycling is one of the exercises and it is even broken down much further into types of cycling like slow, moderate, fast, race, and even mountain biking. All based on time and I have found it to be farily close to what Strava guesses for calories burned.

    So the user keeps track of calories in and calories burned via the app, as well as your weight which you can enter daily. it keeps track of it all, so now there is no excuse to not be informed on your calorie comsumption. It helped me drop 25 lbs in about 4 months and reach my goal. Losing weight can be addictive and I see the potential for more healthy weight loss. It has gotten much harder though and this may be just a function of counting calories but eating mostly the same types of stuff. Gotta make bigger changes in my diet than just eating less of the same. And it is winter so I'm not exercising as much as before. But I'm also not putting anything back on like is typical during winter months. I feel like I'll be starting next bike season with a 25 pound head start.

  23. #23
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    My pop helped a lot of his patients with a diet plan that was so absurdly simple that the hardest part was convincing them that it would do any good. Get the tiniest little pocket notebook you can find, one that you'll have no trouble keeping on you at all times, dedicate one page for every day and write down everything you eat. No calories, no weights or serving sizes, carb counting, etc. The fact is that many people struggling with their weight simply don't have a good grasp on what they are eating in a typical day, but as soon as they see it right in front of them they start to get the perspective to see the big picture.

    Tracking all the other details may be helpful but it's mostly noise around the real issue of understanding your current lifestyle.

  24. #24
    mnoutain bkie rdier
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    Surround yourself with good people who ride a ton....aka...join a club. It is infectious and you can poach training ideas/motivation from your buddies.

    Joining Strava can be a fun motivator for those who don't even race...

    .02

  25. #25
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    Check out bikejames.com. The workouts are designed specifically for mountain biking. The dumbbell program is like $30 and the No Gym program is $20.
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