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  1. #1
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    Experimenting with cadence

    I know I need to raise my cadence, When I race and battle my buddies Iím the guy mashing big gears, I have no problem hanging or passing them. . But Iím turning about 60-70 rpm. When I try to spin or go down to an easier gear I seem to get exhausted a lot faster and I canít hang on then. My question is what I should work on this off season so I can to still maintain the same speed without losing the strong leg strength I have now?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by xcfire
    I know I need to raise my cadence, When I race and battle my buddies Iím the guy mashing big gears, I have no problem hanging or passing them. . But Iím turning about 60-70 rpm. When I try to spin or go down to an easier gear I seem to get exhausted a lot faster and I canít hang on then. My question is what I should work on this off season so I can to still maintain the same speed without losing the strong leg strength I have now?
    Some people say that power is power regardless of how you put it out. High cadence or low cadence. When you say you know you need to raise your cadence, what is your rationale for that? If you have no problem hanging or passing friends then why do you need to raise your cadence?

    I hate doing them but these have been essential for mountain bike racing:
    Leadout intervals
    Sprint intervals

    Leadouts
    0:15 to 0:25 seconds on same time off
    do sets of 4 to 6 with a rest period in between
    start at a cadence of aroun 60 and ramp up cadence to 130rpm as soon as you can and hold that cadence for the duration of the intervals.

  3. #3
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    It will be beneficial to teach yourself how to spin at a higher cadence. There are certain situations were lower cadences are better, and others where higher is better. For example, a friend of mine is a "grinder" and I am more of a "spinner". If we do a road training session, he has no problem keeping with me on the flats but as soon as we hit the hills I can disappear. If you can learn to do both then you will have great all-round ability. I doubt that you will loose your leg strength by spending some time learning to run a higher cadence.

  4. #4
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    What helped me improve leg speed was and is select a lowish gear say low on the second ring. Then start pedeling at the speed you are most comfortable. Then increase the rpm steadily. Finally you will top out, you just can't effectively move your feet with enough coordination to develop power any faster. I started topping out at about 160 rpm.. got it up to about 180 rpm. I dont think this speed is of any use but I did notice an improvement around the 115 to 125 rpm level. This ceertainly help out on some difficult tech climbs.

  5. #5
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    Cadence intervals on the trainer: very simple and effective.
    1) Your mission: spin as consistently and quickly as you can in increments of 60 seconds.
    2) The key word is consistent. Avoid increasing or decreasing cadence during the 60 seconds. So, find a brisk pace you can maintain right off the bat.
    3) Count in your head every time your right foot comes foward. The final count is your record to beat for the next increment.
    4) Do three to five increments of 60 seconds (alternate the foot you count with to avoid going heavy on one particular foot).
    5) Rest by spinning lightly for 60 seconds between increments.
    6) Do not do more than five increments in a training session, and do not do more than three sessions a week. Every fourth week, take a week off from the sessions.
    Last edited by cgee; 09-06-2006 at 07:43 AM.

  6. #6
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    Train at 95 to 100. When you drop back to 80-85, it will feel more like 60-70.

    Quote Originally Posted by xcfire
    I know I need to raise my cadence, When I race and battle my buddies Iím the guy mashing big gears, I have no problem hanging or passing them. . But Iím turning about 60-70 rpm. When I try to spin or go down to an easier gear I seem to get exhausted a lot faster and I canít hang on then. My question is what I should work on this off season so I can to still maintain the same speed without losing the strong leg strength I have now?

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