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  1. #1
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    Eventually get a road bike or is the MTB doing double duty?

    I have a heavier set of wheels that came with a new bike; they're pretty much an after thought and I am having a new lightweight set built for my 26" 4-inch FS with both ends locked out. I am doing 2 hour pavement rides and was thinking of putting on 26" slicks for the road and then slapping the lightweight wheelset for the trails. One bike, two wheelsets.

    How many of you continue to ride the road on a mtb whether it's an old beater or your current main bike with different wheels, or did your pavement miles/time get so great you eventually purchased a road bike. Or is your main mtb a 29er and you slap on slicks; presume that's a pain if running tubeless brew.

    Taking the time to dial in fit on the road bike won't be an issue nor will transitioning to the mtb. I say 50/50 is the ride time split and I'd like to do longer rides but don't know if 3 hours on a mtb on pavement is pleasurable.

  2. #2
    WIRVNTANASHRSH?
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    Road biking is much more fun with other people. So as soon as you start training on the road some, you'll likely find yourself wanting to start doing some fast group rides, metrics, centuries, etc. You sure can't do this with a 26" mtn bike unless you are VERY strong (yes, I've tried) and while I suposed the 29er wheel size will help some, you'll still be at a marked disadvantage in regards to aerodynamics and weight. Unless you plan on riding by yourself 100% of the time, get a road bike.

  3. #3
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    Yeah get a road bike, even if you have lockouts on your fork and shock, your going to wear the bushings and pivots and loose some pedaling efficiency. For the price of a nice wheelset, you can find a used road bike/ cx bike that will make riding on the road much more enjoyable.

  4. #4
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    I just ride my bike on the pavement when the trails are messy, or to the trails when I ride the local ones close enough to my house, best way for me to get in my hours year round. I was doing 3.5 hour rides on my FS bike in late feb/march/early april

  5. #5
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    I got a set of slicks for my mtn bike thinking it would be kinda close to the speed of a roadie........Its nowhere close.

    I find road biking a lot more fun than I thought I would.

  6. #6
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    I built up a nice 29 SS ti I use for training. I slap on a13 tooth in the rear and climb 30 miles of hilly road terrain. I don't know what it is about a SS, road or mtn, I'm lovin it. It's all I ride, fad maybe, but until then, who cares as long as I find fun in road riding.

    Mojo

  7. #7
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    I built up a nice 29 SS ti I use for training. I slap on a13 tooth in the rear and climb 30 miles of hilly road terrain. I don't know what it is about a SS, road or mtn, I'm lovin it. It's all I ride, fad maybe, but until then, who cares as long as I find fun in road riding.

    Mojo

  8. #8
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    Now this bike is real fun on the road.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Eventually get a road bike or is the MTB doing double duty?-img_20110724_090329-1.jpg  

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  9. #9
    zrm
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    Road bike. Get one. The nicest one you can afford and you'll find out why.

  10. #10
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    Thanks. I think tomorrow I'll go and look at the 2011 Giant TCR Composite.

    TCR Composite (2011) - Bikes | Giant Bicycles | United States

    Local dealer has it for $1450 but that's before I haggle some. Seems to be a decent 18.5 pound training bike with a fantastic warranty. The wheels will probably be heavy pigs but the dealer does good trade-in; he owes me one for the last bike purchase so I'm hoping to come out with a lighter wheelset for less than 1500 bucks. Nothing on the local CL.

    I know this isn't roadbikereview.com but I couldn't find anything locally from the likes of Jamis, Specialized (wow, they want a lot for their composite 105 bikes!), Raleigh or even Performance Bike/Nashbar, etc. that had mainly 105, composite and lifetime warranty.

    Again, thanks to all for the input.

  11. #11
    psycho cyclo addict
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    I ride my 29er's on whatever is available dirt, road, rocks, single track, etc. No road bikes for me since the '80's.
    【ツ】 eDub 【ツ】

  12. #12
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    I've been using my mtb for some road rides and I thought I was going quick until a roadie blew by me the other day from out of nowhere. I want a road bike but need to wait a bit cus I'm saving for my new mtb before I get a road.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by danK View Post
    Thanks. I think tomorrow I'll go and look at the 2011 Giant TCR Composite.

    TCR Composite (2011) - Bikes | Giant Bicycles | United States

    Local dealer has it for $1450 but that's before I haggle some. Seems to be a decent 18.5 pound training bike with a fantastic warranty. The wheels will probably be heavy pigs but the dealer does good trade-in; he owes me one for the last bike purchase so I'm hoping to come out with a lighter wheelset for less than 1500 bucks. Nothing on the local CL.

    I know this isn't roadbikereview.com but I couldn't find anything locally from the likes of Jamis, Specialized (wow, they want a lot for their composite 105 bikes!), Raleigh or even Performance Bike/Nashbar, etc. that had mainly 105, composite and lifetime warranty.

    Again, thanks to all for the input.
    That TCR looks pretty sweet for the money. This is only my view but I did buy something similar last year and I didn't regret it.

    If you exchange the wheels, go full custom. If your shop can swap the 105 derailleurs and cranks for ultegra, go for it - ultegra is like XT and is the sweet spot in value. Although 105 is still very good, especially the new 105 shifters with internal cabling... keep those.

    Also when your tires are all worn out, get some 320 TPI clinchers for the ride of your life!

  14. #14
    mnoutain bkie rdier
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    +1 on purchase of true road bike.. I agree with climr..

  15. #15
    mnoutain bkie rdier
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    Quote Originally Posted by DarkoMTB View Post
    I've been using my mtb for some road rides and I thought I was going quick until a roadie blew by me the other day from out of nowhere. I want a road bike but need to wait a bit cus I'm saving for my new mtb before I get a road.
    From a fitness standpoint, it really does not matter. IF you are doing road group rides, then you will most likely need the road bike to keep up depending on how fast the group is.

  16. #16
    Grip it and rip it.
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    Yeah road bike all the way.

    Also if you use your mtb a lot on the road you'll wear the drive train a lot quicker too, not good.
    "Pain is inevitable, suffering is optional"

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  17. #17
    It's about showing up.
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    A second bike, if you can afford it, does spread out the wear and tear. A bike purposed for the road does a superior job over a mtb with slicks.
    I don't rattle.

  18. #18
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    I went with a CX bike. I throw some road tires on and do group rides, or I throw cross tires on and pound some gravel. Even gravel is better then riding the road solo....ugh.

    I'm fortunate enough that a state park within riding distance has over 50 miles of fire road, you may not be as lucky.
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  19. #19
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    I always hated riding the road before I got a road bike. I actually like riding the road (with a road bike) as much as I like riding dirt now.

    Get a road bike!

  20. #20
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    Ive done lots of both road and mtb. Nothing is as versatile as a geared ht29er, even my cx bike as versatile and fun as that was is no comparo...
    Build a nice set of dirt wheels and get a pair of mavic speed-city's for the road, unless you plan on big rides at a fast pace ( centuries, racing) there's no NEED for another bike just WANTs...
    I dig dirt!

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poncharelli View Post
    Now this bike is real fun on the road.
    Send it this way so I can try it!
    Yes its retro but IT WORKS!

    8 Speed is great and V-Brakes rock!

    Ex-wrench...have a Question just ask!

  22. #22
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    Every time I get a road bike I tire of it within a couple months and end up selling it. Even owning both, almost always choose my MTB for the road. I just feelt too restricted on the road bike, can't explore as much as you're more limited by terrain.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by danK View Post
    ... Specialized (wow, they want a lot for their composite 105 bikes!), ...

    It's the Zerts. NASA technology ain't cheap........

  24. #24
    Team Livemedium
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    Road curious are we?

    They are like little carbon rocketships shooting you to the stars.
    Happy hunting.
    Keep trying to do the awesomest thing you've ever done.

  25. #25
    Fat-tired Roadie Moderator
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    I got a road bike not too long after I started riding bikes as a sport, as opposed to just transportation. I still think of myself as more of a mountain biker, but I'm up to three road bikes now - the nice one I bought back in 2000, a 'cross bike, and one I can leave locked outside - to my one mountain bike. I haven't done it this season, but last season I went to my first couple of training crits; a fair chunk of road riding, both alone and with friends, has been part of my riding since I got the bike. My current team has more roadies, although it does have a pretty good MTB contingent as well, so I also get a lot of opportunities to do small group training rides that I wouldn't have a hope of keeping up with on my MTB. In retrospect, I might have been better off if I just bought a 'cross bike in the first place. But I do like my road bike better on the road...

    Actually it got a new rear derailleur today. Thank you, ******y finance guys with weird market research surveys, for the Amazon.com gift certificate.

    Looks like this thread's getting a little old - did you look at the TCR?
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  26. #26
    Grip it and rip it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by brentos View Post
    Every time I get a road bike I tire of it within a couple months and end up selling it. Even owning both, almost always choose my MTB for the road. I just feelt too restricted on the road bike, can't explore as much as you're more limited by terrain.
    But spending time "exploring" Isn't "training". That's the key.
    Efficient training is the main reason to own a road bike.
    "Pain is inevitable, suffering is optional"

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  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Damitletsride! View Post
    Efficient training is the main reason to own a road bike.
    This is true for me. I have a road PT wheel and do purely training rides on the RB: intervals, sprints, group rides, recovery rides.......with power files as an expected product. Short group rides are great for getting highest normalized power, as well as short power PRs (30s, 1min-5min).
    '
    But once I get sick of training, the RB gets hardly any use.

    Right now I have sore knees, inflammed left IT band, and I'm burn't out on racing/training (I've been 6 days a week since start of April). Perfect time for a week off and going back to crossfit class!!
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  28. #28
    Fat-tired Roadie Moderator
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    ^^^
    Good thing it's August. Where I am, at least, MTB and road season are both winding up.

    I can't remember the price on the Speed City off the top of my head, but I seem to remember thinking, "Wow... I could build a better wheel for less than that."
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  29. #29
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    ITB problems

    Quote Originally Posted by Poncharelli View Post
    Right now I have sore knees, inflammed left IT band, and I'm burn't out on racing/training (I've been 6 days a week since start of April). Perfect time for a week off and going back to crossfit class!!
    Ponch what are you doing for your ITB to help mend it? I've been off and on with problems in mine twice this year. NSAID's, foam roller, ice, rest have been my attempts at recovery but it's slow, real slow. Any help/ suggestions would be great man.

  30. #30
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    I did. Rode it around. Did not care for the fit and feel no matter what I did. Turns out I like the "plush bike" geometry of a Felt Z5 or Roubaix or a Defy Advanced (think that's what it's called). The Felt, uh, felt the best. The tall HT and long wheelbase and carbon frame were spot on. I even tried the Scott CR1 Elite but that wasn't an ooooh yeah feeling like the Felt.

    One problem: the local Felt dealer is kind of a db. Wouldn't swap out the dirty white tires. Wouldn't budge on price. Wouldn't.....it's his business and I'm free to take mine elsewhere which I will do.

    The TCR reinforced why I don't buy road bikes without a test ride even though the likes of Competitive Cyclist have killer deals....on models not in my town to test.

    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    Looks like this thread's getting a little old - did you look at the TCR?

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crosstown Stew View Post
    Ponch what are you doing for your ITB to help mend it? I've been off and on with problems in mine twice this year. NSAID's, foam roller, ice, rest have been my attempts at recovery but it's slow, real slow. Any help/ suggestions would be great man.
    Iíve had ITB problems since 2006, and I believe there is no mending, just maintenance. I missed 2 weeks of riding that season due to ITB pain at the outside of the knee, but havenít missed any riding since. Even now, I can still ride, but mentally I just need a week off.

    Iíve done all the things youíve listed and it definitely helps. Stretching really helps in particular doing the Pigeon stretch, standing IT band stretch and other hip stretches (stretching.name (hip)). Always keep that band elongated and loose as possible. Stretch it periodically all day if your job lets you.

    Also, if youíre ITB pain is on the outside of the knees, then doing an ice cube massage really helps. Just grab a couple of ice cubes with a towel and rub the areas in pain. Be careful not to ice burn your skin. Iíve always been safe doing one ice cube per knee till its melted, but burned my skin doing 2 in a row. Now itís something I do just watching TV after a ride, for knee maintenance.

    Iíve tried other things with bike fit (lowering saddle and moving it forward), but doing that causes problems with the front of the knee. Iíve also heard that sitting more upright on the bike helps.
    Last edited by Poncharelli; 08-11-2011 at 12:57 PM.
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  32. #32
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    Thanks man. I'll try stretching more and with the ice, I use paper dixie cups filled with water in the freezer for ice massaging, just peeled the paper away as the ice melts. Learned it in college out of convenience living in the dorms.

    My pain is outside of knee, yesterday re-fit both my bikes, lowering the seat and bars, and pushing my cleat adjustment forward to get my knee closer to over the axle, it was about 10mm in front of the axle prior, thinking that might help.

  33. #33
    Fat-tired Roadie Moderator
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    I had some IT problems. Turned out I had my saddle too high, and I naturally pronate a lot when I walk, so my knee tended to wander when I rode.

    I have fancy insoles in both my road and MTB shoes, a shim in my road shoes, and my MTB shoes are Specialized BG shoes, which are shaped funny, so they don't require the shim. All that helped a lot too.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  34. #34
    Run With The Wind
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    If you are considering a road bike check this one out: Sette Durata 1.0 Ultegra Alloy/Carbon Road Bike at Price Point or this upgraded one looks nice too: Sette Forza Pro Ultegra Carbon Road Bike at Price Point. After dropping 3,300.00 on my Specialized I found these bikes and they are much less with the same parts. My next road bike very soon will be the top of the line sette with dura-ace and that is a good value too. I was not sure about the road bike but once I got it and did some group rides I was hooked.
    You donít know how strong you are until being strong is the only choice you have.

  35. #35
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    I have a Sette Mtn bike that i love and was considering one of their roadies

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/44706805@N07/5572542985/" title="P1070196 by KneerunA, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5257/5572542985_1bda801442_m.jpg" width="240" height="173" alt="P1070196"></a>


    Assuming the bike fit correctly, how would an alloy frame with carbon seat stays ride compared to an all carbon frame?

    I was mainly considering their all carbon Primo w/ 105.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by DavidR1 View Post
    I went with a CX bike. I throw some road tires on and do group rides, or I throw cross tires on and pound some gravel. Even gravel is better then riding the road solo....ugh.
    this.
    Try to be good.

  37. #37
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    I love my 'cross bike and road bike and wouldn't slick my MTB for road work (even though all my MTB's are rigid). MTB's are just too slow on the road to make them enjoyable unless I'm in the right mindset. Sometimes I'll take my 29'er out for light cruising, but nothing of any speed.

    What I really love about my road bike is doing recovery rides. It's difficult to do recovery rides on the trail, since you are always kinda "going at it" due to the varying elevation changes and terrain. It's much easier to pick a flat road and spin for 45 min. on a road or CX bike.

    In fact, today, that is what I plan to do before tomorrow's MTB group ride!

    My road bike is not the fastest or the lightest, but does the job in a fine way. Although sometimes I wonder how sweet a true race bike would be.


  38. #38
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    So you are going to the DARK side, I'm already

    doing the switch, but I'm building a cross bike plus some cross racing this fall. I been doing 20-30 miles per day on the mtb bike and gets old.

  39. #39
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    The full carbon distributes the vibration better than carbon/alumn. At one point I had both and would ride them in the same day and could notice a difference even though one was a road bike and the other a cross.
    You donít know how strong you are until being strong is the only choice you have.

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by danK View Post
    I did. Rode it around. Did not care for the fit and feel no matter what I did. Turns out I like the "plush bike" geometry of a Felt Z5 or Roubaix or a Defy Advanced (think that's what it's called). The Felt, uh, felt the best. The tall HT and long wheelbase and carbon frame were spot on. I even tried the Scott CR1 Elite but that wasn't an ooooh yeah feeling like the Felt.

    One problem: the local Felt dealer is kind of a db. Wouldn't swap out the dirty white tires. Wouldn't budge on price. Wouldn't.....it's his business and I'm free to take mine elsewhere which I will do.

    The TCR reinforced why I don't buy road bikes without a test ride even though the likes of Competitive Cyclist have killer deals....on models not in my town to test.
    I like the relaxed fit as well; I bought a Defy Advanced a few months ago and I love it. The position is much closer to the MTB as well, so it's much easier to switch back and forth.

  41. #41
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    Buying a road bike (well, my salsa vaya), was the best thing I ever did for my mtn biking. With the road bike as an option, I'm able to rider further, more often, in more conditions, which has helped me (dare I say) get in shape. (plus I felt like a dbag on my shiny anthem 29er on the bike path)

  42. #42
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    It's been a week or so, and riding my 4" FS mtb even on lock out is boring as heck on the pavement. I've been driving to the trailhead after running errands.....but with no errands I would not want to drive all the time. Yes, I could ride the pavement most of the way but then the whole "wonder if a road bike would be better for some days?"

    So I'm committed to getting a big wheel...and the idea of buying a new bike, ha. Can't find a 29er geared HT in carbon that I want: that'd be good cuz it could do road and mtb duties.

    Performance Bike is having a 20% off sale even on their sale bikes which could be a good $$$ score, but the bike needs to fit AND "speak to me" like that Felt Z5 did.

    I think a CX bike trumps a pure road bike so it's down to that or a 29er carbon geared HT.
    Last edited by danK; 08-18-2011 at 07:13 AM.

  43. #43
    Rod
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    Quote Originally Posted by danK View Post
    It's been a week or so, and riding my 4" FS mtb even on lock out is boring as heck on the pavement. I've been driving to the trailhead after running errands.....but with no errands I would not want to drive all the time. Yes, I could ride the pavement most of the way but then the whole "wonder if a road bike would be better for some days?"

    So I'm committed to getting a big wheel...and the idea of buying a new bike, ha. Can't find a 29er geared HT in carbon that I want: that'd be good cuz it could do road and mtb duties.

    I think a CX bike trumps a pure road bike so it's down to that or a 29er carbon geared HT.

    I believe you are underestimating the enjoyment you would have on a true road bike, and this is coming from a guy who said he would never own one. After I purchased my road bike I went on group training rides and my fitness improved tremendously. It's fun riding two and three people abreast and talking while riding on a country road. You can have hilly routes for serious training, flat routes for good recovery, and you can control your effort a lot easier on a road bike. It's cool to ride to places you would never go in a car, see great views, eat at a mom and pop restaurant, and then ride back home. It's also awesome to cruise at 25 mph in a paceline and reach speeds over 50+ mph on descents. It's a blast and a great training tool. I still love mountain biking more, but a road bike is a great tool if used properly.
    There is not much choice between rotten apples.

  44. #44
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    Guess you could always look at it this way:
    A Ferrari is excellent on the road and corners beyond belief.
    A F150 is okay on the road and can handle any situation
    A Ferrari is downright impossible to drive offroad and will be destroyed.
    A F150 is downright fun to drive offroad and will ask for more.
    I dig dirt!

  45. #45
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    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by ImaFred View Post
    Guess you could always look at it this way:
    A Ferrari is excellent on the road and corners beyond belief.
    A F150 is okay on the road and can handle any situation
    A Ferrari is downright impossible to drive offroad and will be destroyed.
    A F150 is downright fun to drive offroad and will ask for more.
    ^This. Seriously, the only downside I see to having a road bike is that it will make your mountain bike (even if it is a NICE mountain bike) feel like a pig when you get back on it. It usually takes me several miles on my Anthem29 X1 (~26 lbs) before I get used to it again and back to liking it after riding my road bike for a while...such snappy acceleration and light weight...and my road bike isn't even CLOSE to high end! (GT GTR series 1 w/Rival components, just under 20 lbs). The mountain bike feels so squishy... I am one of the people that thought that road biking would be boring, and I only bought it because it was the right price (used off of craigslist) and so that I could train and ride with my wife on the road...but it is a lot of fun in its own way, and much much better than a mountain bike on the road!

  46. #46
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    after a little over a week of having my new CX bike i have to add something to this thread. i have historically said that i wish i had a cross bike and feel that one would serve as a better do-all bike for MTB racers looking for out-the-back-door training.

    my hunch has been confirmed. i got a Specialized CruX recently and have done the majority of my training on it since. it is a blast to ride. high speed descents on the road are fine. 4500 foot descents on trails/dirt roads gets to be a bit taxing but i think with the new disc brake bikes it would be better. the major advantage is that it is just grin inducing to be ripping down the road and spot some dirt or a grass knoll and steer off the road to go have fun. the bike is way better than riding an MTB (even a Sworks HT) on the road, and only slightly less snappy, and a little slower rolling than my Tarmac.

    a big bonus is also that CX racing is fun and gives a totally different race experience during the "off season".

    here is my ride from last weekend...

    <iframe width='465' height='548' frameborder='0' src='http://connect.garmin.com:80/activity/embed/106303554'></iframe>

    anybody looking to buy a 54cm Sworks Tarmac?
    Try to be good.

  47. #47
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    I ride a classic steel HT; Bontrager Racelite (steel, XTR, carbon bits), a very quick accelerator and climber.

    After time on the road it does take a little while for me to adjust to mtb. It is not just the bike, though, but the surfaces and grades that make the real difference and require you to ride differently. In many ways you must deliver power differently, if only to maintain traction and stay upright.

    Power deilvery on the road is much more long-wavelength where mtb is much more short-wavelength and dynamic. Work on the road bike developes long and deep power and when moving back to mtb many of those hills for which one might gear down just become easier to roll up, top, and accelerate down the other side.

    That said, I don't think the road bike does much for those intense, thigh-burning, steep dirt climbs which are only mitigated by practicing intense, thigh-burning, steep dirt climbs a lot. Road doesn't seem to address that kind of torque-iness. Maybe that is why you hear so many guys brag a little bit about the roadies they ate on steep road climbs while on their dirt rig.

    I own a Roubaix (carbon/zertz, Utegra/Dura-Ace), after years on a classic Medici Pro Strada (steel, Campy Record); I never look back. I just picked up a Sirrus Expert (carbon-zertz/alu,105) for commuting. Qualifier; 60 year old geezer with arthritis in hands. Road biker turned mtb-er in 1983. Brought road bike back into quiver in 2003. When I first threw my leg back over a road bike in '83 it felt like riding a rail. Ugh! Mo' bettah' now.

    The gross difference between the Roubaix and the Sirrus is obvious. The Roubaix's all carbon fiber monoframe with carbon fiber/zertz fork and zertz seatstays can distribute forces throughout the entire frame. While it is still stiff enough for my purposes, vibrations and hits which get past the stays and fork are well dampened further in the major tubes. The Sirrus does a nice job of taking the edge off of bumps but the carbon/zertz stays and carbon/zertz fork do transmit whatever is left of the hit or vibration into a relatively stiffer alloy frame. You definitely feel them more than on the Roubaix. I will put a carbon seatpost and bar on the Sirrus.
    Last edited by Berkeley Mike; 08-18-2011 at 09:56 AM.
    I don't rattle.

  48. #48
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    Drivetrain parts wearing out?

    Quote Originally Posted by Damitletsride! View Post
    Yeah road bike all the way.

    Also if you use your mtb a lot on the road you'll wear the drive train a lot quicker too, not good.



    What is it about mountain bike parts that wear faster than road bike parts (on the road)?
    My mtn bike does double-duty - lots of riding to work on slicks/pavement.

  49. #49
    Grip it and rip it.
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    Well it's just that parts are going to wear down and stop working so well eventually. So I like to keep my mtb for off road racing and training only. It's bad enough having to change the cassette and chain after every other 24 hour solo, if i rode my mtb on the road as well it would rarely be in good working order i think, unless i spent a lot of time maintaining it.

    I don't mind when some of the gears on my road bike don't work, so long as its mostly function able. But I like to keep my mtb in good condition.
    "Pain is inevitable, suffering is optional"

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  50. #50
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    I use my old M2 Stumpjumper HT for road, urban and paved trail use. Its about 23 lbs and super efficient w/ slicks on it. Night vs. day compared to my FS bike on pavement in terms of efficiency and fun factor, but similar cockpit set-up and ergonomics so that jumping from one to the other is not a drastic change in position.

    I see no need for a dedicated roadie unless you are doing group road rides.

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