Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 50 of 52
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    3,022

    Dropper Post for XC

    What brand are you guys using for your XC hard tails? Weight is a concern. I don't think it is efficient to always have to stop to drop the post. It takes away from the fun of blasting up and down trails.
    So far the only reliable ones I found are Rockshox and Fox. I have the Rockshox Reverb on my AM FS bike. Like everything except the weight.

    Thanks

    (Please don't suggest specialized command post. Sorry to say but the saddle clamp is really bad and will not be considered)

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: chomxxo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    1,016
    That's disappointing to hear. I'd read good reviews about the Specialized Command Post.

    Right now I'm actually looking at a Crank Brothers Kronolog 125mm. It's under 500 grams. That's about the target weight for most dropper posts that I've seen. I have raced without a dropper post for several years and done well but due to my height it could definitely be to my advantage to use one. So, I'm willing to give it a try.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WR304's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    4,796

    Dropper Post for XC

    If it's for a hardtail do you need a 27.2mm diameter seatpost?

    I don't think there are many 27.2mm dropper seatposts. KS Lev do one and there's maybe a new Specialized Command Post 27.2mm diameter with an inverted head also, as seen here on Conrad Stoltz's bike.

    http://www.conradstoltz.com/index.ph...pic-world-cup/


  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: chomxxo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    1,016
    Good point about diameter. I ride a FS so my post is 31.6. The weight weenie in me is dying at the prospect of tacking on 300 more grams though.

    Dang, Stoltz has got a QX1 ring, jel. Wonder if his XL bike weighs in at less than mine though? He's got some heavier wheels and tires, not to mention that weekend warrior bar setup.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Dropper Post for XC-jet9carbon_01.jpg  

    Last edited by chomxxo; 11-21-2013 at 03:06 PM.

  5. #5
    more skier than biker
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    2,080
    I have the KS Lev and abolutely love it. Hardly any play (i.e. side to side wiggle) in the saddle post interface, and extremely reliable so far. Very smooth. I used it on my FS on fun rides and for technical XC races. I haven't thought about the weight...it just makes the ride more fun.

    That being said however, there is a carbon-ish version coming out that will be a lot more expensive but seems to get the weight down of the Lev around 400-ish grams Doesn't have as much travel, but probably don't need all that much for XC rides anyway. Check it out: EB13: Kind Shock Adds Carbon LEV Dropper Seatpost ? Standard & Stealth Options

  6. #6
    zrm
    zrm is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    5,474
    I have the specialized command post that was spec'd on my bike. I've had it for about three months and so far it's been trouble free.

    I think I will take it off, replace it with a carbon post for most of my general riding around here and reinstall the dropper when I go to places like Moab with a lot of steep, ledge drop type trails where I actually feel the dropper is worth the weight. I just don't use it very much around here, (Summit County CO). We have plenty of rock and root infested trails with long downhills but there isn't that much where I feel a dropper is justified.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    3,022
    Running 31.6 on my carbon hardtail. Actually if i had a choice, prefer not to run hydrallic. Cable is simple

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: pharmaboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    505
    Quote Originally Posted by Loll View Post
    What brand are you guys using for your XC hard tails? Weight is a concern. I don't think it is efficient to always have to stop to drop the post. It takes away from the fun of blasting up and down trails.
    So far the only reliable ones I found are Rockshox and Fox. I have the Rockshox Reverb on my AM FS bike. Like everything except the weight.

    Thanks

    (Please don't suggest specialized command post. Sorry to say but the saddle clamp is really bad and will not be considered)
    Why is weight a concern?


    300gm - at a guess, that's 10 seconds over a 60min XC lap - I would comfortably gap 95% of riders more than 20seconds on a 4 minute descent. An adjustable seatpost might allow you to have the best seat position going up as well as down. You don't see them in word cup races because those guys are stupidly brilliant going down, even on a hardtail.

    Fun and safety

    If you like em, ride em

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    3,022
    Weight is a concern coz I spend the past two years losing 10 lbs on myself(I am light weight and thin to begin with), and 10 lbs on the bike to finally get a 22 lbs bike. Dropper post has such good advantage on the downhill technical section that I want it. But I am constantly debating if it is counter intuitive to put that much weight back on the bike itself. I know the decent is going to be much more enjoyable.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: pharmaboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    505
    22 lbs is light for sure, the question is whether you are chasing weight for weights sake, or chasing performance.

    10lbs definately makes a noticeable difference , measurable, and probably seat of of the pants noticeable. 1/2 a pound - not so much. At best 1/20th of the previous improvement.

    Try it, if it makes a difference to the confidence and fun you have, you'll keep it and suck up the 300g , if it makes no difference to how you ride - ebay.

  11. #11
    Your Best Friend
    Reputation: Silentfoe's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    3,741

    Re: Dropper Post for XC

    Quote Originally Posted by pharmaboy View Post
    You don't see them in word cup races because those guys are stupidly brilliant going down, even on a hardtail.
    You don't see them in most XC races because just about anyone is competent enough to ride down any downhill included in most typical XC races. Most racers are good. They just are. A dropper post will not give you a time advantage at all. If you like it and feel more comfortable with one then ride one but don't seduce yourself into thinking it will give you any advantage.
    I'm a mountain bike guide in South West Utah

  12. #12
    zrm
    zrm is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    5,474
    Quote Originally Posted by Silentfoe View Post
    You don't see them in most XC races because just about anyone is competent enough to ride down any downhill included in most typical XC races. Most racers are good. They just are. A dropper post will not give you a time advantage at all. If you like it and feel more comfortable with one then ride one but don't seduce yourself into thinking it will give you any advantage.
    The only place I can see it being an advantage is on super steep and gnarly descents with good size drops, and even there I'm not sure it would be that much of a time advantage.

    Personally, I don't see what the big deal is and given the expense, weight, and how much trouble people seem to have with a lot of brands, I wouldn't have bought bought one.

  13. #13
    Armature speller
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    1,861
    I love my command post and have never had a problem with the saddle clamp.

    As I get more confidence, I use it less.
    Last XC race, it got used 10-15 times per lap...

    I'm going to get some carbon paste though, just for peace of mind.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: chomxxo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    1,016
    Quote Originally Posted by Silentfoe View Post
    You don't see them in most XC races because just about anyone is competent enough to ride down any downhill included in most typical XC races. Most racers are good. They just are. A dropper post will not give you a time advantage at all. If you like it and feel more comfortable with one then ride one but don't seduce yourself into thinking it will give you any advantage.
    Not necessarily true. Saddle-bar drop for tall guys can be extreme (see photos above). For myself it would be helpful to get a tighter position around tight turns as well. Yes I have done very well for myself in Cat 1 without it, but I haven't tried a dropper post yet, so I'm not knocking it.

  15. #15
    Your Best Friend
    Reputation: Silentfoe's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    3,741
    I'm 6'3" and most would consider me a tall guy. If you can't get lower around a corner without dropping your seat post, you're doing it wrong. I'm a pretty strict XC style guy but I do have skillz. I bought a dropper earlier this year and rode it for almost the entire season. Pretty much decided it was worthless.
    I'm a mountain bike guide in South West Utah

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    15
    Depends on the course. Some courses I never use it, others I have gapped people on knarly descents laughing all the way to the finish line. Won' t race without one, family commitments prevent me from pre-riding courses. I use the reverb, thomson looks intriguieing.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation: pharmaboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    505
    Quote Originally Posted by Whatmeworry View Post
    Depends on the course. Some courses I never use it, others I have gapped people on knarly descents laughing all the way to the finish line. Won' t race without one, family commitments prevent me from pre-riding courses. I use the reverb, thomson looks intriguieing.
    Horses for courses, I have one, but I don't use it in races, mainly because i find I need to take some seconds to adjust and also I forget to put it back up, BUT some tracks to lend it some advantages.

    An example of a time where it helped was at mt stromlo in Canberra , passed by a female team rider when she called for track (Jenny Fay), with seat down, I easily held her wheel for the km descent - this was mainly a downhill course.

    Either way, dropper posts are an advantage when generally riding, rarely on an xc course, but ad to the fun content.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation: chomxxo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    1,016
    Quote Originally Posted by Silentfoe View Post
    I'm 6'3" and most would consider me a tall guy. If you can't get lower around a corner without dropping your seat post, you're doing it wrong. I'm a pretty strict XC style guy but I do have skillz. I bought a dropper earlier this year and rode it for almost the entire season. Pretty much decided it was worthless.
    Yeah, no. I mean really tight trails, full of turns. Y'all don't have enough trees in Utah to understand, lol.

  19. #19
    Your Best Friend
    Reputation: Silentfoe's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    3,741
    Quote Originally Posted by chomxxo View Post
    Y'all don't have enough trees in Utah to understand, lol.
    Huh? You need to get out more.
    I'm a mountain bike guide in South West Utah

  20. #20
    Fat-tired Roadie Moderator
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    18,189
    Quote Originally Posted by Silentfoe View Post
    I'm 6'3" and most would consider me a tall guy. If you can't get lower around a corner without dropping your seat post, you're doing it wrong. I'm a pretty strict XC style guy but I do have skillz. I bought a dropper earlier this year and rode it for almost the entire season. Pretty much decided it was worthless.
    Sorry you lost some money on this, but semi-glad to hear it. I demoed some Treks a few weeks ago specifically because they had dropper seat posts. Decided not to buy one. I was actually kind of excited about the idea before I went, too.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  21. #21
    Your Best Friend
    Reputation: Silentfoe's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    3,741
    Yeah, honestly the only reason I got one is because of my hook up at the shop I help at (specifically for hook ups). It cost me nothing. I may put it on again if I get sufficiently bored but...Anyone want to borrow it for awhile?
    I'm a mountain bike guide in South West Utah

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation: chomxxo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    1,016
    Quote Originally Posted by Silentfoe View Post
    Huh? You need to get out more.
    I was trying to gently point out that you're outclassed. When it comes to very tight situations vertically and in cornering, in Category 1, racing, ahem, the difference will manifest itself a little more clearly. I think a while back you said you're like 200 pounds?

    I'm looking forward to trying a dropper post in the offseason and timing my laps against the fast little guys on the tight, twisty trails. Just for comparison's sake, I'm talking about moving from third place Cat 1 podiums to 1st place, on just those trails that would help me. Thanks for understanding that we're in the XC Racing and Training thread.

  23. #23
    LMN
    LMN is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    4,311
    The gap that you get to other riders is sort of meaningless when analyzing equipment. What matters is the gap you get to yourself.

    Give an honest effort and you will find that a dropper post does not make you 20s faster on a 4 minute descent. And if it actually does, you either need to practice descending with your seat up or your descents are much more gnarly then those found on any XC course.

    I have found that on extended descents I end up being a bit slower with a dropper post. I find I fatigue quicker because I end up standing in place where I would sit and rest.

    The Nimby 50, a race in Pemberton BC, has a descent called overnight sensation. Most who have ridden the race would agree that it is gnarliest descent found in any XC race anywhere. I am reasonably quick down in it, top 5% of all racers. I have ridden it with and without a dropper post. The difference in my times is minimal, I was quicker with my seat up, but that is because I had a better run.

    Quote Originally Posted by pharmaboy View Post
    Why is weight a concern?
    300gm - at a guess, that's 10 seconds over a 60min XC lap - I would comfortably gap 95% of riders more than 20seconds on a 4 minute descent. An adjustable seatpost might allow you to have the best seat position going up as well as down. You don't see them in word cup races because those guys are stupidly brilliant going down, even on a hardtail.

    Fun and safety

    If you like em, ride em
    "The best pace is suicide pace, and today is a good day to die." Steve Prefontaine

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation: pharmaboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    505
    You are absolutely correct, I think my reply leads you down the garden path a bit. The info about down hill speed was just me big noteing lol. Never done a timed difference, and only used the dropper on a race that included the bottom half of a national downhill course.

    The stromlo downhill course wasn't about gnarly rock step downs etc - it is about berms, speed, doubles, triples A, B and C lines. I don't know about other peoples bike setup, but mine means a lot of weight over the front when going down, which is great for tight turn grip but absolutely shit for bumpy braking into a corner - you need to be able to control the back end.

    How much benefit is a dropper? - I don't know. Does it confer some benefit? - of course it does. It is worth it? - see question 1.

    We do a bit of all mountain racing round here, typically aimed at 5" 6" bikes with pedalling sections and usually shuttles to the top ( small vertical loss, maybe 100m for a section). Sort of like a mini downhill - these are won by fast people. IMO I can keep up with an elite XC racer , downhill on an xc course on a FS XC ( suspect FS helps here)but I have no chance in all mountain racing on my rig - I am not dumb enough, don't have the right equipment etc, and none of those guys run anything like the seatpost height you'd run in XC.

    I believe that someone running only a. 1" drop from seat to bars or less probably has nothing to gain, because you can so easily get behind the seat in at setup, once you get to 2", 3" and more drop, that MOFO of a seat is smashing all sorts of parts of your body




    Quote Originally Posted by LMN View Post
    The gap that you get to other riders is sort of meaningless when analyzing equipment. What matters is the gap you get to yourself.

    Give an honest effort and you will find that a dropper post does not make you 20s faster on a 4 minute descent. And if it actually does, you either need to practice descending with your seat up or your descents are much more gnarly then those found on any XC course.

    I have found that on extended descents I end up being a bit slower with a dropper post. I find I fatigue quicker because I end up standing in place where I would sit and rest.

    The Nimby 50, a race in Pemberton BC, has a descent called overnight sensation. Most who have ridden the race would agree that it is gnarliest descent found in any XC race anywhere. I am reasonably quick down in it, top 5% of all racers. I have ridden it with and without a dropper post. The difference in my times is minimal, I was quicker with my seat up, but that is because I had a better run.

  25. #25
    Your Best Friend
    Reputation: Silentfoe's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    3,741

    Re: Dropper Post for XC

    Quote Originally Posted by chomxxo View Post
    I was trying to gently point out that you're outclassed. When it comes to very tight situations vertically and in cornering, in Category 1, racing, ahem, the difference will manifest itself a little more clearly. I think a while back you said you're like 200 pounds?
    Oh so sorry. I guess I need to weigh less to have my opinion mean something. Thanks, I forgot I didn't know how to ride.
    I'm a mountain bike guide in South West Utah

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation: pharmaboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    505
    Silentfoe- earlier into the thread you told someone who for all you know is substantially quicker than you, that they are "doing it wrong" - that's called throwing the first stone, don't be sullen when it's tossed back at you.

    By all means comment on your own experiences but then applying them to others in a judgemental way is going to get you called out.

    Back on topic , it is my opinion that most people don't run droppers because of extra weight. The physics of weight would suggest that is a misplaced reason - adding the complication of the remote is what complicates it for me - my brain has a hard enough time being in the right gear before my legs need it, without also thinking about where my seat is and where it should be at race pace

  27. #27
    LMN
    LMN is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    4,311
    Quote Originally Posted by pharmaboy View Post
    You are absolutely correct, I think my reply leads you down the garden path a bit. The info about down hill speed was just me big noteing lol. Never done a timed difference, and only used the dropper on a race that included the bottom half of a national downhill course.
    I think you need to a timed difference before you can really make an argument. I have done a lot of timing and perception of being faster is vastly different then being faster.

    Make sure you give it an honest shake, if you always descend with your seat down then you are probably going suck at descending with your seat up. It will take a bit of work to learn to descend with your seat up.

    But to answer your question why not run a dropper?
    -Weight. It is heavier and more weight does slow you down. How much does it slow you down? Probably not a lot but if the difference between 1st and 2nd is 20 seconds you might want to look at the dropper post.
    -Expense. A lot of money to spend on something that might make a difference.
    -Marginal performance benefit.
    -Fragile. Anybody who runs a dropper post for any length of time has had problems.
    -Complexity. Changing gears and suspension setting is already quite a bit to do while racing. Adding another adjustment can be problems.
    "The best pace is suicide pace, and today is a good day to die." Steve Prefontaine

  28. #28
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    2,877
    There's only one course in my Provincial race series where I'd consider using a dropper post, that's because it uses the full run of a DH course plus a large downhill segment of an enduro course. Based on my timed runs of the course, a dropper post would be good for 30-60 seconds over the course of a race, but to me the key benefit was that it gives me a larger margin of error on my last lap when I'm tired and sloppy. I can get away with minor mistakes with my seat down which would likely cause a crash if I had the seat up in my normal riding position.

  29. #29
    I Tried Them ALL... Moderator
    Reputation: Cayenne_Pepa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    6,021
    Loll - wait until March, 2014. KS is releasing their full carbon dropper post, which is supposed to weigh only 380g, in 31.6 form. The only thing I don't like is the 2.5" max drop and price(@$700!).
    "The ONLY person who needs to race.....is the entrant"

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation: pharmaboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    505
    2 considerations missing,
    - Fun
    - Safety.

    Both impact how much the motor gets trained, so if you are riding just a little more, chances are you'll be just a little faster? - I know, grasping at straws........

    Complexity is why I don't have have one on my race bike at the moment - just found myself a couple of times not in the optimum height when I should have been. Strava descents tell me I do my best on the bike equipped with a Dropper ( but only marginally) and 30minute loops tell me there is no difference between the 12+kg Anthem training bike and the 11kg jet rdo race bike - the condition of the motor on any given day makes more difference than the equipment.

    .
    Quote Originally Posted by LMN View Post
    I think you need to a timed difference before you can really make an argument. I have done a lot of timing and perception of being faster is vastly different then being faster.

    Make sure you give it an honest shake, if you always descend with your seat down then you are probably going suck at descending with your seat up. It will take a bit of work to learn to descend with your seat up.

    But to answer your question why not run a dropper?
    -Weight. It is heavier and more weight does slow you down. How much does it slow you down? Probably not a lot but if the difference between 1st and 2nd is 20 seconds you might want to look at the dropper post.
    -Expense. A lot of money to spend on something that might make a difference.
    -Marginal performance benefit.
    -Fragile. Anybody who runs a dropper post for any length of time has had problems.
    -Complexity. Changing gears and suspension setting is already quite a bit to do while racing. Adding another adjustment can be problems.

  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dirtdan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    1,619
    The best and lightest dropper post is a flexible rider with a straight carbon fiber seat post. I don't understand those that say it's annoying to "have to stop" and change your seat post height as it's nothing I've ever "had" to do in my entire life of riding.

  32. #32
    zrm
    zrm is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    5,474
    Quote Originally Posted by dirtdan View Post
    The best and lightest dropper post is a flexible rider with a straight carbon fiber seat post. I don't understand those that say it's annoying to "have to stop" and change your seat post height as it's nothing I've ever "had" to do in my entire life of riding.
    Yeah, I've never stopped to change my seat post hight on a ride, let alone a race.

    Like I said before, I've found my dropper to be handy for serious drops and roll downs and very technical sections like you see in places like Moab, but for 95% of the riding I do close to home I don't feel the need to use it. Some to the racing in my region is done on what would be considered fairly technical course's, but few of them have anything which , IMO at least, justify the weight and distraction of a dropper.

  33. #33
    mtbr member
    Reputation: chomxxo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    1,016
    Front suspension, rear suspension, G2 geometry, disc brakes, 29" wheels, all were looked down upon until they started coming in with wins. XC has a very purist undercurrent, but once something is proven to be effective people forget their previous biases.

    I like to watch this video after hearing heated debate on a new tech and how we don't need it, and then I laugh and laugh. Look at these idiots:
    Old school 1992 downhill mountain biking race events! LOTS of Crashing!! - YouTube

    As for myself, my big Jet 9 carbon is only 10kg, and adding even the lightest dropper post makes me sad to think about It's something else to try in the offseason. Right now flat pedals and a slammed saddle for fun rides on the hardtail are where it's at.

  34. #34
    LMN
    LMN is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    4,311
    Dropper post are a lot of fun and they definitely enable you to ride some lines that are pretty sketchy with your seat up. I run one on my trail bike. But I don't ever see one having a place on my XC race bike.

    As you said bikes, and bike weight don't make that much of a difference. But there is a difference, and it is a measurable difference. As I said if a bike is a 20s faster over an XC race that can be significant.


    Quote Originally Posted by pharmaboy View Post
    2 considerations missing,
    - Fun
    - Safety.

    Both impact how much the motor gets trained, so if you are riding just a little more, chances are you'll be just a little faster? - I know, grasping at straws........

    Complexity is why I don't have have one on my race bike at the moment - just found myself a couple of times not in the optimum height when I should have been. Strava descents tell me I do my best on the bike equipped with a Dropper ( but only marginally) and 30minute loops tell me there is no difference between the 12+kg Anthem training bike and the 11kg jet rdo race bike - the condition of the motor on any given day makes more difference than the equipment.

    .
    "The best pace is suicide pace, and today is a good day to die." Steve Prefontaine

  35. #35
    mtbr member
    Reputation: chomxxo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    1,016
    Kind of old news, but Nino Schurter rode a dropper post in an Enduro Race, so there.

    Scott Genius LT proves its race credentials | Bike Magic

  36. #36
    zrm
    zrm is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    5,474
    Quote Originally Posted by chomxxo View Post
    Kind of old news, but Nino Schurter rode a dropper post in an Enduro Race, so there.

    Scott Genius LT proves its race credentials | Bike Magic
    An Enduro? Not quite the same thing as an XC race. People do Enduros on "All Mountain" bikes and other monster trucks.

  37. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation: chomxxo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    1,016
    Quote Originally Posted by zrm View Post
    An Enduro? Not quite the same thing as an XC race. People do Enduros on "All Mountain" bikes and other monster trucks.
    I'm aware of that, but let's just say that it isn't against the XC World Champ's religion to use a dropper post.

  38. #38
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    2,018
    I race XC with a Gravity Dropper. I ride and train on a lot of rocks and prefer having the ability to drop the saddle when needed.

    At a course like Bear Creek (nationals course) it can be helpful. For most courses I could get away without using it. I don't NEED it, but it's so much more fun to get your saddle out of the way. Next season I'll probably run both a dropper and normal post depending on the course.

  39. #39
    zrm
    zrm is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    5,474
    Quote Originally Posted by chomxxo View Post
    I'm aware of that, but let's just say that it isn't against the XC World Champ's religion to use a dropper post.
    Not against my religion either. Depending on the course, I could see a droppers worth for an enduro, but IMO and experience (my "trail" bike came with a dropper that I'm going to remove and save for trips to canyon country) it's not worth having one for an XC race.

  40. #40
    mtbr member
    Reputation: chomxxo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    1,016
    There you go. Sounds reasonable to me. The legendary El Paso Puzzler 50 miler in the Franklin Mountains is full of steep descents and big granite rocks, including a 100-yard downhill scree field. I'd have loved to have one for that race.

    Quote Originally Posted by Flucod View Post
    +1, great post. I rode SS at Nationals this year with a Gravity Dropper. Was top 10 after 1st lap and was no way I would have been in the top 30 without it. Horses for courses.

    90% of XC course no need, but the other 10% you can gain a huge advantage. Some of the gnarly courses here I can attain a 3 minute faster lap time with one.

  41. #41
    mtbr member
    Reputation: craign's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    160
    Cairns WC maybe we'll see a pro running a dropper?

  42. #42
    Registered Dietitian
    Reputation: tommyrod74's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    1,393
    Quote Originally Posted by chomxxo View Post
    I'm aware of that, but let's just say that it isn't against the XC World Champ's religion to use a dropper post.
    It also probably wouldn't be "against his religion" to use a DH bike in a DH race, or a CX bike in a CX race, or a BMX bike on a BMX track...

  43. #43
    mtbr member
    Reputation: chomxxo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    1,016
    Quote Originally Posted by tommyrod74 View Post
    It also probably wouldn't be "against his religion" to use a DH bike in a DH race, or a CX bike in a CX race, or a BMX bike on a BMX track...

    Or rear suspension in an XC race, or disc brakes in an XC race, or wide bars in an XC race, or...

  44. #44
    Registered Dietitian
    Reputation: tommyrod74's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    1,393
    Quote Originally Posted by chomxxo View Post
    Or rear suspension in an XC race, or disc brakes in an XC race, or wide bars in an XC race, or...
    Touche.

    The added weight and complexity of a dropper post makes it a bad tradeoff for me in my races, but if others find those drawbacks are offset by the advantages, I can understand that.

  45. #45
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    3
    Try the Thomson Elite Dropper with under the saddle actuator lever if you don't want to have an external cable, or your bike does not have internal cable routing... I am seriously considering one. It wouldn't be for speed or advantage, but more for confidence when going down huge declines... however, it seems to be the most reliable and highest quality one out on the market. It also appears to be the lightest.

  46. #46
    Bad cat!
    Reputation: montana_ben's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    357
    I've ridden (and raced some) both with and without a dropper and I STILL can't answer this question for myself. It's like your body adapts to two quite different styles of riding and you shift back and forth as needed. The first rides with the dropper back on the bike are "wow, I love this thing", but if I'm in weight weenie mode and take it off I just adapt again and forget about it.

    Somehow the overall feeling of the bike is more "weapon" with a standard post, more stripped down and simple, and more "play" with a dropper. Not very rational I know.

    The only hard data I have on the local xc course is on the 'final downhill' strava segment. Last year using a dropper, best time 2:52, this year not using a dropper ( but same bike) best time the other evening was 2:57. Course conditions roughly equivalent. Just an anecdote.

  47. #47
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    3
    I would like one more for fun. Me being lower to the bike makes me personally feel more confident on steep inclines downhill... But they are heavy.

  48. #48
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    180
    Went with a dropper this year on the XC hardtail. It was a PITA to adjust too, just one more thing to think about. I consider myself pretty good in the tech sections...for riding a 100mm forked HT. After adjusting to it I see the two main advantages:
    1) Factor of safety - not necessarily faster (brain can only process so quick) but I have better control of the bike is something goes wrong.
    2) Much quicker around tricky corners - can lower CG and get in a much more neutral stance.

    Weight / maintenance aside - there is absolutely a huge advantage running a dropper from a handling perspective, no question.

  49. #49
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    3
    Have you seen the Thomson Elite w/ under saddle actuator lever? No PITA cables! I pulled the trigger on it... found it with lever for $350. I will install on my 2011 Superfly full suspension XC bike.

  50. #50
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    28
    Anyone see this?

    Instagram

    Short travel, 27.2mm Specialized command post. Surely XC orientated?

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Dropper Post on SS????
    By sparkie in forum Singlespeed
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: 12-08-2013, 03:16 PM
  2. Which Dropper post?
    By Fluffsri in forum Downhill - Freeride
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 08-01-2013, 08:42 AM
  3. What dropper post can take DH?
    By man w/ one hand in forum Downhill - Freeride
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 04-02-2013, 12:10 PM
  4. Which dropper post
    By Loll in forum California - Norcal
    Replies: 56
    Last Post: 07-27-2012, 10:44 PM
  5. Have a RIP? Get a dropper post!
    By Jisch in forum Niner Bikes
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 12-06-2011, 06:52 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •