Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    72

    Difficulty getting HR up

    Hey there,

    I recently started doing some road training and I struggle to get my HR up on flat segments and even on hills. My legs simply give up way before I reach my target HR Zone. Today I was supposed to have some 90 secs Zone 5 intervals but I was struggling to even reach the end of Zone 3.

    I recently increased my training to around 15 hours/week (from 8 hours) and I am sure this is due to over training or not being used to those longer efforts.

    My question however is: Should I continue riding and simply ride Zone 2 or should I increase recovery days (doing nothing) to be able to do the Zone 5 intervals?

    Beside proper nutrition (protein etc.) and sleep, are there other factors which could influence the HR? Someone mentioned early morning. I usually wake up at 5am for my rides.

    Side note:
    I am not sure if those long Zone 2 Trainings (2+ Hours) are actually beneficial for XC racing. I used to do some very sharp, <1hr workouts and I finished podium in every race. Any comments on that?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Bro
    Bro is offline
    Where I do my thinking
    Reputation: Bro's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    4,061
    You say you recently started training. How long have you been riding? It could just be a lack of fitness, where your legs give up before your cardio does.

    Another thing is that recent jump in training volume. Going from 8-15 hours/week is not a good thing to do. Most people recommend a 5% increase in distance per week, and that's nowhere near an almost 200% increase in volume. Scale it back, much closer to your previous 8 hours/week, and then slowly add a bit more time per week. Otherwise you'll hurt yourself.

    And the heartrate: If it's a trend that you're seeing over several rides, where you can't elevate it, then I would say fatigue is a likely cause. That's especially likely if that jump from 8->15 hours/week was recent. Take a week or two off, then start again at 8 hours/week and slowly increase the volume until you have a workload where you can do all your workouts satisfactorily.
    I've made some bad decisions like taking the gears off my bike. So here's the warning: Do not as I say, nor as I do.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    72
    Makes sense. Thanks a lot.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    713
    Bro has some good advice. I went from 5-6 hours per week last year to 10-16 hours this year, but the average intensity went way down (and I got a lot faster). Here are some other thoughts: It also depends on what are you doing for your 15 hours per week. Is it a hard 15 hours? Do you have adequate recovery rides? If I do 15 hours, at least 2-3 hours are zone 1 (2x 1 hour recovery rides, plus significant recovery times after doing intervals and very little time is spent in higher zones. Are you sure your HR zones are right? If your legs feel tired, you might also be building up lactic acid if you go too hard for too long. You've got to build in that recovery to keep your legs feeling fresh. Lastly, HR lags power significantly. If you want to do a zone 4 or zone 5 effort, be careful not to go out too hot. The goal is to go at a steady pace through the interval. Training with a power meter eliminates this issue. I train with a heart rate monitor and have gotten used to how zone 4 feels, so I'll start with a zone 4 effort and it can take quite a while for my heart rate to get into zone 4, but once the heart rate gets to zone 4, it stays there. If you try to get your HR in zone 4 as fast as you can, then you're going too hard at the beginning of the interval and you WILL tire your legs out and not be able to sustain your effort for the rest of the interval.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    72
    Hey,

    thanks a lot. So you are saying that by increasing time and decreasing intensity you are actually getting faster? Good to know because I was not sure if I should stick to my short and sharp stuff or go longer with less intensity.

    I am following a plan I purchased from TrainingPeaks and it has (sometimes several) Zone 1 and 2 recovery rides every week so I assume it is properly planned from this perspective.

    I calculated the HR Zones after a 30 Minute TT with the several calculators they have as well on TrainingPeaks etc. Should be fairly accurate.

    The point with starting to fast to get to Zone 4 or 5 quickly seems plausible in my case. Need to time this a little different apparently.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WR304's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    3,415

    Difficulty getting HR up

    My suggestion if you've just gone from regularly riding 8 hours per week up to 15 hours per week would be to cut right back on the intensity work but maintain the volume. As the riding volume goes up it becomes increasingly hard to sustain doing both long hours and high intensity.

    Intervals waste of time?

    Give yourself time to get used to the increased volume and then take stock of how you're feeling.

    In terms of heart rate when doing plenty of mileage I frequently have no heart rate response at all. If I'm doing 15 to 20 hours per week riding my heart rate falls off a cliff. I'll be riding hard, setting personal bests for power output and the heart rate monitor will be saying recovery pace! Trust your instincts. If you feel good, despite the lack of heart rate response, then chances are you're going ok still.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    72
    Thanks for the link. This is exactly what I was wondering about! And as for the HR: Spot on once again. PRs on Strava but I am riding low HR although it should be way up.

  8. #8
    VIP
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    201
    Can't get it up, eh?

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    1,634
    You can also try and lower the load on your legs. Try spinning a faster than normal cadence, that should help stress your cardio system more and allow you to get the heart rate up for the same power level.

    Although, I agree this likely has more to do with the increase in training volume and fatigue. Do you know for a fact that your previous sharp efforts with the lower volume were in fact in the zone you're thinking they were in? (i.e., were you training with HR then?)

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    72
    Yeah I did train with HR all the time. Efforts were within the Zone. 20 minutes Zone 5 was possible then 10 minutes Zone 1/2 and another 20 Minutes Zone 4. All in all one hour only.

Similar Threads

  1. Difficulty Getting Behind The Saddle
    By utahheadgear in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 09-19-2012, 08:20 AM
  2. Having difficulty with eggbeater / shoes
    By Blueliner in forum Apparel and Protection
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 01-02-2012, 11:51 AM
  3. cassette - freehub difficulty
    By moon-age2 in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 03-28-2011, 01:22 PM
  4. Difficulty with clipless pedals-I need help!
    By nevermiss in forum Clydesdales/Tall Riders
    Replies: 33
    Last Post: 03-28-2011, 12:25 PM
  5. Difficulty with Clipless Pedals-I need help!
    By nevermiss in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 27
    Last Post: 03-19-2011, 07:51 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •