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Thread: cutting weight

  1. #1
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    cutting weight

    I have put on a few pounds in the off season and am up to 178 at 5'10. not huge but would like to get it under control. I have started to pay attention to what I eat. I wouldn't say I am on some complicated diet I have been just paying attention to portions and trying to not eat just because I am bored which I do a lot of at work, and cutting out eating when I get home from work.

    in the past two weeks I have lost about 8lbs. I would like to get down to 160 or maybe even 155. my problem is as soon as I seem to cut some calories out within a couple of days I just feel weak. I am not talking about crashes in the middle of the day or stuff like. during my day I feel fine and don't seem to be down on energy, but whenever I do my workouts now I am definitely down enough to notice.

    so my question is how can I lose weight but not lose my fitness in the meantime? Is it a matter of just dealing with it until I get to my goal weight and then my body will adjust and my energy during my workouts will go back up? could i be losing weight to fast. i know 8 pounds in two weeks is probably a little to much but we all know how easy the first couple come off so i assume it will slow down soon.

  2. #2
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    I like this guys approach: Racing Weight by Matt Fitzgerald
    He also has a quickstart & recipe book that are pretty good.

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    I'm sure you'll get more rigorous replies about this, but I'll give you my remedy for the same issue... First, it's winter, and I'm always ~10 heavier now than 2-3 weeks into riding outside (starting ~March 10); some of this is fat, some is extra upper-body muscle from the gym. Leading up to those first weeks of riding outside (say, the 2 weeks or so before starting outdoor "training"), I hit the trainer in the morning, 4 times a week, doing a solid hour of light tempo work, making sure to stay hydrated; I take a double-shot of espresso beforehand. Then I eat a breakfast of 1 cup no-fat yogurt, ~1/2 cut raw oatmeal, and some almonds. It's filling, but not fattening. Then I eat sensible lunches and dinners, usually chicken breasts and quinoa and greens. Then I do my usual gauntlet of afternoon training, but interval lifting once a week, just like in season. For me, this gets the fat off pretty fast; then, during the first 2-3 weeks of riding outside, I keep the same diet, and the fat stays gone, often goes away more -- depending on beer intake and occasional carnitas festivals. Food's too good to sacrifice for a few shaved seconds.

    BTW: I'm at 169 now; I'll be 155 or less by the end of March, easy.

    Hope this helps.

  4. #4
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    One question for you:

    How many hours a week are you riding?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Le Duke View Post
    One question for you:

    How many hours a week are you riding?
    4 hours riding and 4 hours running.

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    Quote Originally Posted by adumb View Post
    4 hours riding and 4 hours running.
    That could be part of the answer.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Le Duke View Post
    That could be part of the answer.
    you must be trolling. surely you don't think it takes more than 8 hours a week of working out along with a nice diet plan to lose weight.

    what do you think i should be doing?

  8. #8
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    First and foremost, this is the XC Racing and Training forum.

    When considering your question, I assumed you have/had an interest in bicycle racing.

    If that's the case, yes, you should consider upping your hours on the bike, if possible.

    Ride 15hrs a week and the weight will take care of itself.

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    your really coming off hard on me for asking a simple question. if this forum was only for super fast guys putting in 15 hours a week i don't think it would see many post.

    i am asking to hear other riders experiences with trying to diet while riding and see if they also felt more tired than usual during workouts until there weight leveled out.

  10. #10
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    I Feel your pain. I keep track of my calories and workouts on Training Peaks software. I have a lot more weight to lose then you and I'm in my mid 40's so it comes off slow even with a lot of riding. I do notice when I up the intensity and volume I have to eat a little more or my workouts suffer. For instance when I have a few back to back days where I'm at a -800 on my calories (in other words I have burned 800 more calories then I ate) I start to pay for it. One thing that helps me is to make sure I get some carbs before/during/and right after my workouts. I can eat less and still train hard if I do this right. That should help you. Then the rest of the day you can cut calories. Make sure on rest days to not eat many carbs, and don't snack after dinner. You can get away with eating less when you fuel up well before/during/after exercise. I think if you do that you'll feel better. Let me know how it works out for you.

  11. #11
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    le duke your usually good for something helpful, but in this case your just being... well unreasonable. It doesnt take 15 hours a week to get in good shape, just the right plan. Will riding 15 hours get you in shape? sure. However, a plan such as the time crunched cyclist shows you can reach "raceable" shape in far fewer hours.

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    Concur with Le Duke, upping time riding will help.

    Consider: just sitting on a stationary bike or erg in front of the tv for just 1 hr a day, gently spinning the legs, for every day in a year equates to 365hrs of additional training. Is that a significant amount of training? Hell yes. Two types of people, those who watch more than 1hr of tv a day and liars.

    Next point, weight loss or gain is *almost* all about energy in vs energy out (there are factors such as the thermogenic effect of certain foods).

    It is best to keep track of everything that goes into the body and as much as possible what goes out. Weight yourself 2-3 times a day and then average over the week to get an indication of whether weight is actually changing (bodyweight can vary up to 2-3kgs a day through hydration and faecal matter alone).

    Two throw-away points, but probably very crucial, are: get more sleep and don't drink any calories (that goes doubly-so for alcohol). Do these two and watch what happens.

    And ride your bike more.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TapewormWW View Post
    Weight yourself 2-3 times a day and then average over the week to get an indication of whether weight is actually changing (bodyweight can vary up to 2-3kgs a day through hydration and faecal matter alone).
    That is ridiculously obsessive compulsive. My plan is usually just to try eat fairly clean, control portions and get a lot of exercise. Just eat when you're hungry but don't gouge yourself. It works pretty well even in the winter when I'm only training about 10 hrs/week. I keep a pretty steady weight around 170 lbs at 6'2". Any lower is unmaintainable for me. I also like to have a beer at dinner. It may be empty calories, but I'd rather enjoy life than worry about every little pound. I'm not a pro, so depriving myself isn't necessary.

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    Quote Originally Posted by adumb View Post
    your really coming off hard on me for asking a simple question. if this forum was only for super fast guys putting in 15 hours a week i don't think it would see many post.

    i am asking to hear other riders experiences with trying to diet while riding and see if they also felt more tired than usual during workouts until there weight leveled out.


    Don't get whipped up. It just seemed strange when you posted that you run 5 hours a week. Most XC racers don't run as it doesn't contribute to becoming a faster rider - unless they do it as cross training once a week as a substitute for riding, but most only cross-train for a short time (several weeks).

    If you're eating clean, you should start lossing the weight by riding more and running less. I went from 175lbs to 155lbs in 3 months by upping my riding to 16h a week. No diet change really. I was eating the same kinds of foods and not really monitoring my cal intake but not trying to over do it too much either..

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fat Urkel View Post
    Don't get whipped up. It just seemed strange when you posted that you run 5 hours a week. Most XC racers don't run as it doesn't contribute to becoming a faster rider - unless they do it as cross training once a week as a substitute for riding, but most only cross-train for a short time (several weeks).

    If you're eating clean, you should start lossing the weight by riding more and running less. I went from 175lbs to 155lbs in 3 months by upping my riding to 16h a week. No diet change really. I was eating the same kinds of foods and not really monitoring my cal intake but not trying to over do it too much either..
    If I were to guess, he's probably a triathlete. Running is actually really good for keeping the weight off as well. Replacing 5 hrs of running w/ 5 hrs of riding won't do much in terms of burning more calories. Obviously it will make you a better rider though.

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    Tips

    The biggest tip I can give you is to not eat 4 hours before bed time. The way I do this is to know when im going to go to sleep and plan accordingly. If I know i need to eat more, then i do. Even it if means eating until im very full.

    Also it's easy to cut some cal's but switching out milk or calorie drinks with straight water for a few weeks. You can easily cut sever 100 cals just by taking in water only

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    I was lucky in that my partner last year thought it would be interesting to work with a top level sports nutritionist for a month. I got the trickle down effect from that.

    Best advice I learned from that was to eat consistently throughout the day and make sure you getting a good, appropriate balance of macro-nutrients. This will ensure your body is getting what it needs to perform. I think many people when loosing weight try more of the feast and famine routine.

    A daily schedule might be.

    Breakfast (500 calories)
    Morning Snack (250 calories)
    Lunch (500 calories)
    Afternoon snack (250 calories)
    Dinner (500 calories)
    Evening snack (150 calories)

    That's 2150 calories, which is good baseline for the daily (not exercising) lifestyle of a 160-170 lb guy.

    Throwing in exercising. During base training, add in 100 calories during ride if over an hour. Always have 100-300 calories for immediately post work out. This is a big factor. Replenish so you are ready to go again, which includes on the bike.

    If you do a 1.5 hour base ride, burning say 750 calories, but you took in 100 during the ride, 150 post ride, you are still net -500 per day and loosing 1lb per week.

    If I follow a routine like this, I feel great. This includes during race season, though numbers are slightly modified. I wish I was better at doing all this consistently.

    Obviously, during winter base training, 1lb per week is a good goal, but I've always struggled with loosing weight during build periods or race season, though I managed to loose a little last summer doing this (though only on a 1/2 lb per week basis, which I think is more realistic for higher intensity periods where you can't rely as much on aerobic fat burning).

    So that's my experience. Lots of food, though in smaller portions and a good balance of macro-nutrients (AKA enough carbs).

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    Quote Originally Posted by TapewormWW View Post
    Concur with Le Duke, upping time riding will help.

    Consider: just sitting on a stationary bike or erg in front of the tv for just 1 hr a day, gently spinning the legs, for every day in a year equates to 365hrs of additional training. Is that a significant amount of training? Hell yes. Two types of people, those who watch more than 1hr of tv a day and liars.
    If your primary focus is on racing (which I assume is the case given this is the XC racing thread) this advice is really off the mark. Regularly getting on the bike to spin your legs for an hour will do virtually nothing to improve your racing capabilities. Training for racing is all about intensity and you would be much better off doing hard intervals for an hour every couple / few days than just spinning your legs in front of the TV each day. I would also agree / echo the comments made by spec4life. Given the weather in the Northeast right now it would be difficult to get in 15hrs of training on the bike right now unless you are willing to put in major hours on your trainer (ughh) but there are lots of other things you can do to prepare for this year's racing season. Running, weightlifting, aerobics classes, spin classes etc. For weight loss check out Racing Weight as mentioned above ... it is an interesting / easy read and will give you some ideas on what and what not to do.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cusco View Post
    I would also agree / echo the comments made by spec4life. Given the weather in the Northeast right now it would be difficult to get in 15hrs of training on the bike right now unless you are willing to put in major hours on your trainer (ughh) but there are lots of other things you can do to prepare for this year's racing season. Running, weightlifting, aerobics classes, spin classes etc.
    If you're in a snowy part of the country, xc skiing is one of the best activities you can do for bike racing.

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    While the original suggestion to do 15 hours a week might have been a little curt, it's a worthy experiment (if you can pull it off) just to experience the physiological response.

    Your resistance to fatigue improves.
    Your speed improves everywhere - up, down, and flat.
    Your weight drops.
    Your technical riding improves because you're lighter, going faster, and you're not as fatigued for the tech stuff.
    It's like having your own private tailwind.

    And it doesn't require a program or a coach. Just ride.

    But, it's a lot of work. It's mentally taxing. You might question yourself.
    It's really not sustainable for most people with family responsibilities.
    But, if you ever get the chance to do that kind of load for a few months, the results are eye-opening.

    Quote Originally Posted by Cusco View Post
    If your primary focus is on racing (which I assume is the case given this is the XC racing thread) this advice is really off the mark. Regularly getting on the bike to spin your legs for an hour will do virtually nothing to improve your racing capabilities. Training for racing is all about intensity and you would be much better off doing hard intervals for an hour every couple / few days than just spinning your legs in front of the TV each day. I would also agree / echo the comments made by spec4life. Given the weather in the Northeast right now it would be difficult to get in 15hrs of training on the bike right now unless you are willing to put in major hours on your trainer (ughh) but there are lots of other things you can do to prepare for this year's racing season. Running, weightlifting, aerobics classes, spin classes etc. For weight loss check out Racing Weight as mentioned above ... it is an interesting / easy read and will give you some ideas on what and what not to do.

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    I wanted to try and not pour out my whole life story when trying to start a topic. but since it has come up I will explain my situation a little more. I live in mass. so it is off season right now or people are starting there base. I wanted to run a half marathon on february 23rd with a couple of my buddies for fun. so in December I started working towards that goal while still trying to make sure i get some riding in. Once I finish the half marathon I will be back on the bike and doling 9-12 hours a week.

    This works out for me because last year I got a little tired come august and september. So this year I pushed back my base a month so i can hopefully finish the season strong.

    cptsydor, great post that was a really good breakdown on what kind of intake i should be doing. i think i am just not taking in enough calories. I have been using the livestrong calorie tracker app. For the past two week i have been doing just under 2000 calories.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TapewormWW View Post

    Next point, weight loss or gain is *almost* all about energy in vs energy out
    Well stated! When I start training in winter and have a few pounds to loose, I find that the first week the weight comes off fast, but than it seems to steady itself out. Once I have my power back to where it was last summer (usually about 8 weeks of hard training) I find it hard to eat enough to keep up! Therefore, I concentrate more on making more power than my calories. Yet, I do make sure I eat right (non-processed foods) and get 25% protein and 30-35% Fat in my diet.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TapewormWW View Post

    Next point, weight loss or gain is *almost* all about energy in vs energy out (there are factors such as the thermogenic effect of certain foods).
    From a purely physiological level, this is true, but I think the 'psychology' of the body is just as important. I think this is something people just don't consider enough.

    By psychology of the body I mean, if you are burning 3000 calories a day, you could lose weight really well eating a couple big mac meals right before bed, every day, coming in at 2500 calories. Willing to bet people wouldn't feel good, nor could you come close to training at your potential.

    While loosing weight is fundamentally so simple, to put in practice, and combine with training, takes a lot more effort and knowledge. For some people, it's pretty easy, they naturally do it, for others, it can be a steep learning curve.

  24. #24
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    It's great to be able to use high training volume for weight management, but remember that learning to modulate intake to reflect how much volume you are doing (less calories when training less) is important for long-term weigh maintenance.

    It's really no good (physically or mentally) to have to re-lose the weight after each offseason.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CptSydor View Post
    From a purely physiological level, this is true, but I think the 'psychology' of the body is just as important. I think this is something people just don't consider enough.

    By psychology of the body I mean, if you burning 3000 calories a day, you could lose weight really well eating a couple big mac meals right before bed, every day, coming in at 2500 calories. Willing to bet people wouldn't feel good, not could you come close to training at your potential.

    While loosing weight is fundamentally so simple, to put in practice, and combine with training, takes a lot more effort and knowledge. For some people, it's pretty easy, they naturally do it, for others, it can be a steep learning curve.
    The most recent winner of the Vuelta a Espana would disagree with you.

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