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  1. #1
    JRR
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    Cleat Placement and power output

    figured I'd get the best answer in the race forum on this.Got a new pair of sidi shoes,I installed new cleats same placement as my old shoes.I jumped on my cross bike,and after a few 100 yards felt like I was working more than normal,went back adjusted cleats as close to the heel of my shoe as I could,went back out and imedetaly felt more power output. So my question is being your heel is a pivot point and your foot is the lever the closer you get the contact point(cleat) to the pivot(heel) the more power output or easier to isolate larger mucles to do the work? Thanks for any advise.

  2. #2
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    Cleat placement has a big effect on power out put. I realied I had the cleats on my road shoes too far forward, and moved them back and immediately felt stronger, and less fatigued after rides. I've read that you want to aim to have the axle of the pedal about 1-2mm behind the ball of your foot as a general guide.
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  3. #3
    AZ
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    Article in this months Bicycling Magazine addresses this subject , cleat placement is dependent upon specific goals ie. sprinting , climbing , even shoe size . Check it out .

  4. #4
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    The last scientific article I read on this, some years ago, suggested placing the cleat further toward the toes for greater sprinting ability, and further toward the heel for greater sustained power (less fatigue, smaller peak power). Personally, I place my cleat as far back as possible. On my last pro-fit, the fitter had some other technique (drawing a line between two parts of foot, I forget details) and what he considered the optimum position was the same as I've always done- cleats to the rear.

  5. #5
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    Of course, don't just place your cleat anywhere, aiming for more power - if your legs/joints (knees especially) are accustomed to one position, moving your cleats by even a little can cause problems which, left unattended, can become chronic issues.

    If you're going to move your cleats, do it by a little at a time, one adjustment a week or so. If you have been riding with the new position and have zero problems, that's okay - but for most folks, don't just change the position without considering the potential problems.
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Henchman
    The last scientific article I read on this, some years ago, suggested placing the cleat further toward the toes for greater sprinting ability, and further toward the heel for greater sustained power (less fatigue, smaller peak power). Personally, I place my cleat as far back as possible. On my last pro-fit, the fitter had some other technique (drawing a line between two parts of foot, I forget details) and what he considered the optimum position was the same as I've always done- cleats to the rear.

    Gotta say my cleats are all the way to the rear as well, seems like most people do better with the cleats all the way back....

    Which is weird you would think the shoe manufacturers would get it so that most people were at least in the adjustment range????

  7. #7
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    Lots of debate on this, with Friel at least somewhat advocating for a cleat position well behind the traditional ball of the foot placement:

    http://www.trainingbible.com/joesblo...-position.html

  8. #8
    Just Ride.
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    Hmmm this is very interesting, I put my cleats a fair way forward just because it felt a little more comfortable. I might move them back a little after reading this thread.

  9. #9
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    I've been away from bicycling for ~3 years & just started riding again ~1 month ago. I initially started out with the cleat position to the very rear (heel) of my new shoes but I've now moved them all the way forward. When I was seriously into XC racing years ago, I purposely bought shoes ~1 size too small to maximize efficiency (?). I still have those shoes with the cleats still installed & the cleats are all the way to the rear (heel) but when I compare the relative position of the cleats from the shoe toe on both shoes there's not much difference. My new, properly-sized, shoes have their cleats just slightly forward compared to my older pair of shoes. So basically, in terms of cleat position relative to the front of the shoe, I'm approximately in the same place as I was with my old shoes.

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